HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Wednesday - February 1, 2023

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [flesh]

2
1
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

flesh

FLESH, n. [I know not the primary sense; it may be soft.]

1. A compound substance forming a large part of an animal, consisting of the softer solids, as distinguished from the bones and the fluids. Under the general appellation of flesh, we include the muscles, fat, glands &c., which invest the bones and are covered with the skin. It is sometimes restricted to the muscles.

2. Animal food, in distinction from vegetable.

Flesh without being qualified with acids, is too alkalescent a diet.

3. The body of beasts and fowls used as food, distinct from fish. In Lent, the Catholics abstain from flesh, but eat fish.

4. The body, as distinguished from the soul.

As if this flesh, which walls about our life,

Were brass impregnable.

5. Animal nature; animals of all kinds.

The end of all flesh is come before me. Gen. 6.

6. Men in general; mankind.

My spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh. Gen. 6.

7. Human nature.

The word was made flesh, and dwelt among us. John 1.

8. Carnality; corporeal appetites.

Fasting serves to mortify the flesh.

The flesh lusteth against the spirit. Gal. 5.

9. A carnal state; a state of unrenewed nature.

They that are in the flesh cannot please God. Rom. 8.

10. The corruptible body of man, or corrupt nature.

Flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God.

1Cor. 15.

11. The present life; the state of existence in this world.

To abide in the flesh is more needful for you. Phil. 1.

12. Legal righteousness, and ceremonial services.

What shall we then say that Abraham, our father as pertaining to the flesh, hath found? Rom. 4. Gal. 3.

13. Kindred; stock; family.

He is our brother, and our flesh. Gen. 37.

14. In botany, the soft pulpy substance of fruit; also, that part of a root, fruit, &c., which is fit to be eaten.

One flesh, denotes intimate relation. To be one flesh is to be closely united, as in marriage. Gen. 2. Eph. 5.

After the flesh, according to outward appearances, John 8:

Or according to the common powers of nature. Gal. 4.:

Or according to sinful lusts and inclinations. Rom. 8.

An arm of flesh, human strength or aid.

FLESH, v.t.

1. To initiate; a sportsman's use of the word, from the practice of training hawks and dogs by feeding them with the first game they take or other flesh.

2. To harden; to accustom; to establish in any practice, as dogs by often feeding on any thing. Men fleshed in cruelty; women fleshed in malice.

3. To glut; to satiate.

The wild dog

Shall flesh his tooth on every innocent.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [flesh]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FLESH, n. [I know not the primary sense; it may be soft.]

1. A compound substance forming a large part of an animal, consisting of the softer solids, as distinguished from the bones and the fluids. Under the general appellation of flesh, we include the muscles, fat, glands &c., which invest the bones and are covered with the skin. It is sometimes restricted to the muscles.

2. Animal food, in distinction from vegetable.

Flesh without being qualified with acids, is too alkalescent a diet.

3. The body of beasts and fowls used as food, distinct from fish. In Lent, the Catholics abstain from flesh, but eat fish.

4. The body, as distinguished from the soul.

As if this flesh, which walls about our life,

Were brass impregnable.

5. Animal nature; animals of all kinds.

The end of all flesh is come before me. Gen. 6.

6. Men in general; mankind.

My spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh. Gen. 6.

7. Human nature.

The word was made flesh, and dwelt among us. John 1.

8. Carnality; corporeal appetites.

Fasting serves to mortify the flesh.

The flesh lusteth against the spirit. Gal. 5.

9. A carnal state; a state of unrenewed nature.

They that are in the flesh cannot please God. Rom. 8.

10. The corruptible body of man, or corrupt nature.

Flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God.

1Cor. 15.

11. The present life; the state of existence in this world.

To abide in the flesh is more needful for you. Phil. 1.

12. Legal righteousness, and ceremonial services.

What shall we then say that Abraham, our father as pertaining to the flesh, hath found? Rom. 4. Gal. 3.

13. Kindred; stock; family.

He is our brother, and our flesh. Gen. 37.

14. In botany, the soft pulpy substance of fruit; also, that part of a root, fruit, &c., which is fit to be eaten.

One flesh, denotes intimate relation. To be one flesh is to be closely united, as in marriage. Gen. 2. Eph. 5.

After the flesh, according to outward appearances, John 8:

Or according to the common powers of nature. Gal. 4.:

Or according to sinful lusts and inclinations. Rom. 8.

An arm of flesh, human strength or aid.

FLESH, v.t.

1. To initiate; a sportsman's use of the word, from the practice of training hawks and dogs by feeding them with the first game they take or other flesh.

2. To harden; to accustom; to establish in any practice, as dogs by often feeding on any thing. Men fleshed in cruelty; women fleshed in malice.

3. To glut; to satiate.

The wild dog

Shall flesh his tooth on every innocent.

FLESH, n. [Sax. flæc, flec, or flæsc; G. fleisch; D. vleesch; Dan. flesk. In Danish, the word signifies the flesh of swine. I know not the primary sense; it may be soft.]

  1. A compound substance forming a large part of an animal, consisting of the softer solids, as distinguished from the bones and the fluids. Under the general appellation of flesh, we include the muscles, fat, glands, &c., which invest the bones and are covered with the skin. It is sometimes restricted to the muscles.
  2. Animal food, in distinction from vegetable. Flesh without being qualitied with acids, is too alkalescent a diet. Arbuthnot.
  3. The body of beasts and fowls used as food, distinct from fish. In Lent, the Papists abstain from flesh, but eat fish.
  4. The body, as distinguished from the soul. As if this flesh, which walls about our life, / Were brass impregnable. – Shak.
  5. Animal nature; animals of all kinds. The end of all flesh is come before me. – Gen. vi.
  6. Men in general; mankind. My spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh. – Gen. vi.
  7. Human nature. The word was made flesh, and dwelt among us. – John i.
  8. Carnality; corporeal appetites. Fasting serves to mortify the flesh. – Smalridge. The flesh lusteth against the spirit. – Gal. v.
  9. A carnal state; a state of unrenewed nature. They that are in the flesh can not please God. – Rom. viii.
  10. The corruptible body of man, or corrupt nature. Flesh and blood can not inherit the kingdom of God. – 1 Cor. xv.
  11. The present life; the state of existence in this world. To abide in the flesh is more needful for you. – Phil. i.
  12. Legal righteousness, and ceremonial services. What shall we then say that Abraham, our father as pertaining to the flesh, hath found? – Rom. iv. Gal. iii.
  13. Kindred; stock; family. He is our brother, and our flesh. – Gen. xxxvii.
  14. In botany, the soft pulpy substance of fruit; also, that part of a root, fruit, &c., which is fit to be eaten. One flesh, denotes intimate relation. To be one flesh, is to be closely united, as in marriage. – Gen. ii. Eph. v. After the flesh, according to outward appearances, John viii: – Or according to the common powers of nature. Gal. iv: – Or according to sinful lusts and inclinations. Rom. viii. An arm of flesh, human strength or aid.

FLESH, v.t.

  1. To initiate; a sportman's use of the word, from the practice of training hawks and dogs by feeding them with the first game they take, or other flesh.
  2. To harden; to accustom; to establish in any practice, as dogs by often feeding on any thing. Men fleshed in cruelty; women fleshed in malice. – Sidney.
  3. To glut; to satiate. The wild dog / Shall flesh his tooth on every innocent. – Shak.

Flesh
  1. The aggregate of the muscles, fat, and other tissues which cover the framework of bones in man and other animals; especially, the muscles.

    * In composition it is mainly albuminous, but contains in adition a large number of crystalline bodies, such as creatin, xanthin, hypoxanthin, carnin, etc. It is also rich in phosphate of potash.

  2. To feed with flesh, as an incitement to further exertion] to initiate; -- from the practice of training hawks and dogs by feeding them with the first game they take, or other flesh. Hence, to use upon flesh (as a murderous weapon) so as to draw blood, especially for the first time.

    Full bravely hast thou fleshed
    Thy maiden sword.
    Shak.

    The wild dog
    Shall flesh his tooth on every innocent.
    Shak.

  3. Animal food, in distinction from vegetable; meat; especially, the body of beasts and birds used as food, as distinguished from fish.

    With roasted flesh, or milk, and wastel bread. Chaucer.

  4. To glut; to satiate; hence, to harden, to accustom.

    "Fleshed in triumphs." Glanvill.

    Old soldiers
    Fleshed in the spoils of Germany and France.
    Beau. & Fl.

  5. The human body, as distinguished from the soul; the corporeal person.

    As if this flesh, which walls about our life,
    Were brass impregnable.
    Shak.

  6. To remove flesh, membrance, etc., from, as from hides.

  7. The human eace; mankind; humanity.

    All flesh had corrupted his way upon the earth. Gen. vi. 12.

  8. Human nature

    : (a)
  9. Kindred; stock; race.

    He is our brother and our flesh. Gen. xxxvii. 27.

  10. The soft, pulpy substance of fruit; also, that part of a root, fruit, and the like, which is fit to be eaten.

    * Flesh is often used adjectively or self-explaining compounds; as, flesh broth or flesh-broth; flesh brush or fleshbrush; flesh tint or flesh-tint; flesh wound.

    After the flesh, after the manner of man; in a gross or earthly manner. "Ye judge after the flesh." John viii. 15. -- An arm of flesh, human strength or aid. -- Flesh and blood. See under Blood. -- Flesh broth, broth made by boiling flesh in water. -- Flesh fly (Zoöl.), one of several species of flies whose larvæ or maggots feed upon flesh, as the bluebottle fly; -- called also meat fly, carrion fly, and blowfly. See Blowly. -- Flesh meat, animal food. Swift. -- Flesh side, the side of a skin or hide which was next to the flesh; -- opposed to grain side. -- Flesh tint (Painting), a color used in painting to imitate the hue of the living body. -- Flesh worm (Zoöl.), any insect larva of a flesh fly. See Flesh fly (above). -- Proud flesh. See under Proud. -- To be one flesh, to be closely united as in marriage; to become as one person. Gen. ii. 24.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

125

842

97

923

157

953
Flesh

FLESH, noun [I know not the primary sense; it may be soft.]

1. A compound substance forming a large part of an animal, consisting of the softer solids, as distinguished from the bones and the fluids. Under the general appellation of flesh we include the muscles, fat, glands etc., which invest the bones and are covered with the skin. It is sometimes restricted to the muscles.

2. Animal food, in distinction from vegetable.

FLESH without being qualified with acids, is too alkalescent a diet.

3. The body of beasts and fowls used as food, distinct from fish. In Lent, the Catholics abstain from flesh but eat fish.

4. The body, as distinguished from the soul.

As if this flesh which walls about our life,

Were brass impregnable.

5. Animal nature; animals of all kinds.

The end of all flesh is come before me. Genesis 6:3.

6. Men in general; mankind.

My spirit shall not always strive with man, for that he also is flesh Genesis 6:3.

7. Human nature.

The word was made flesh and dwelt among us. John 1:13.

8. Carnality; corporeal appetites.

Fasting serves to mortify the flesh

The flesh lusteth against the spirit. Galatians 5:13.

9. A carnal state; a state of unrenewed nature.

They that are in the flesh cannot please God. Romans 8:1.

10. The corruptible body of man, or corrupt nature.

FLESH and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God.

1 Corinthians 15:39.

11. The present life; the state of existence in this world.

To abide in the flesh is more needful for you. Philippians 1:22.

12. Legal righteousness, and ceremonial services.

What shall we then say that Abraham, our father as pertaining to the flesh hath found? Romans 4:1. Galatians 3:3.

13. Kindred; stock; family.

He is our brother, and our flesh Genesis 37:27.

14. In botany, the soft pulpy substance of fruit; also, that part of a root, fruit, etc., which is fit to be eaten.

One flesh denotes intimate relation. To be one flesh is to be closely united, as in marriage. Gen 2. Ephesians 5:29.

After the flesh according to outward appearances, John 8:15

Or according to the common powers of nature. Gal 4:

Or according to sinful lusts and inclinations. Romans 8:1.

An arm of flesh human strength or aid.

FLESH, verb transitive

1. To initiate; a sportsman's use of the word, from the practice of training hawks and dogs by feeding them with the first game they take or other flesh

2. To harden; to accustom; to establish in any practice, as dogs by often feeding on any thing. Men fleshed in cruelty; women fleshed in malice.

3. To glut; to satiate.

The wild dog

Shall flesh his tooth on every innocent.

Why 1828?

0
6
 


I love truth

— Rich (Hinckley, IL)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

yellow-earth

YELLOW-EARTH, n. A soft yellow mineral found at Webraw, in Upper Lusatia. United with clay and argillaceous ironstone.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

309

482

Compact Edition

285

207

CD-ROM

247

162

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.235 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top