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Wednesday - July 28, 2021

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [flake]

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flake

FLAKE, n. [L. floccus; Gr. Flake and flock are doubtless the same word, varied in orthography, and connected perhaps with L. plico, Gr. The sense is a complication, a crowd, or a lay.]

1. A small collection of snow, as it falls from the clouds or from the air; a little bunch or cluster of snowy crystals, such as fall in still moderate weather. This is a flake, lock or flock of snow.

2. A platform of hurdles, or small sticks made fast or interwoven, supported by stanchions, on which cod-fish is dried.

3. A layer or stratum; as a flake of flesh or tallow.

Job. 41.

4. A collection or little particle of fire, or of combustible matter on fire, separated and flying off.

5. Any scaly matter in layers; any mass cleaving off in scales.

Little flakes of scurf.

6. A sort of carnations of two colors only, having large stripes going through the leaves.

White-flake, in painting, is lead corroded by means of the pressing of grapes, or a ceruse prepared by the acid of grapes. It is brought from Italy, and of a quality superior to common white lead. It is used in oil and varnished painting, when a clean white is required.

FLAKE, v.t. To form into flakes.

FLAKE, v.i. To break or separate in layers; to peel or scale off. We more usually say, to flake off.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [flake]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FLAKE, n. [L. floccus; Gr. Flake and flock are doubtless the same word, varied in orthography, and connected perhaps with L. plico, Gr. The sense is a complication, a crowd, or a lay.]

1. A small collection of snow, as it falls from the clouds or from the air; a little bunch or cluster of snowy crystals, such as fall in still moderate weather. This is a flake, lock or flock of snow.

2. A platform of hurdles, or small sticks made fast or interwoven, supported by stanchions, on which cod-fish is dried.

3. A layer or stratum; as a flake of flesh or tallow.

Job. 41.

4. A collection or little particle of fire, or of combustible matter on fire, separated and flying off.

5. Any scaly matter in layers; any mass cleaving off in scales.

Little flakes of scurf.

6. A sort of carnations of two colors only, having large stripes going through the leaves.

White-flake, in painting, is lead corroded by means of the pressing of grapes, or a ceruse prepared by the acid of grapes. It is brought from Italy, and of a quality superior to common white lead. It is used in oil and varnished painting, when a clean white is required.

FLAKE, v.t. To form into flakes.

FLAKE, v.i. To break or separate in layers; to peel or scale off. We more usually say, to flake off.


FLAKE, n. [Sax. flace; D. vlaak, a hurdle for wool; vlok, a flock, a flake, a tuft; G. flocke, fluge, id.; Dan. flok, a herd, and lok, a lock or flock of wool; L. floccus; Gr. πλοκη, πλοκος; It. fiocco; Ir. flocas. Flake and flock are doubtless the same word, varied in orthography, and connected perhaps with L. plico, Gr. πλεκω. The sense is a complication, a crowd, or a lay.]

  1. A small collection of snow, as it falls from the clouds or from the air; a little bunch or cluster of snowy crystals, such as fall in still moderate weather. This is a flake, lock or flock of snow.
  2. A platform of hurdles, or small sticks made fast or interwoven, supported by stanchions, on which cod-fish is dried. Massachusetts.
  3. A layer or stratum; as, a flake of flesh or tallow. Job xli.
  4. A collection or little particle of fire, or of combustible matter on fire, separated and flying off.
  5. Any scaly matter in layers; any mass cleaving off in scales. Little flakes of scurf. Addison.
  6. A sort of carnations of two colors only, having large stripes going through the leaves. Encyc. White-flake, in painting, is lead corroded by means of the pressing of grapes, or a ceruse prepared by the acid of grapes. It is brought from Italy, and of a quality superior to common white lead. It is used in oil and varnished painting, when a clean white is required. Encyc.

FLAKE, v.i.

To break or separate in layers; to peel or scale off. We more usually say, to flake off.


FLAKE, v.t.

To form into flakes. Pope.


Flake
  1. A paling; a hurdle.

    [prov. Eng.]
  2. A loose filmy mass or a thin chiplike layer of anything; a film; flock; lamina; layer; scale; as, a flake of snow, tallow, or fish.

    "Lottle flakes of scurf." Addison.

    Great flakes of ice encompassing our boat. Evelyn.

  3. To form into flakes.

    Pope.
  4. To separate in flakes] to peel or scale off.
  5. A flat layer, or fake, of a coiled cable.

    Flake after flake ran out of the tubs, until we were compelled to hand the end of our line to the second mate. F. T. Bullen.

  6. A platform of hurdles, or small sticks made fast or interwoven, supported by stanchions, for drying codfish and other things.

    You shall also, after they be ripe, neither suffer them to have straw nor fern under them, but lay them either upon some smooth table, boards, or flakes of wands, and they will last the longer. English Husbandman.

  7. A little particle of lighted or incandescent matter, darted from a fire; a flash.

    With flakes of ruddy fire. Somerville.

  8. A small stage hung over a vessel's side, for workmen to stand on in calking, etc.
  9. A sort of carnation with only two colors in the flower, the petals having large stripes.

    Flake knife (Archæol.), a cutting instrument used by savage tribes, made of a flake or chip of hard stone. Tylor. -- Flake stand, the cooling tub or vessel of a still worm. Knight. -- Flake white. (Paint.) (a) The purest white lead, in the form of flakes or scales. (b) The trisnitrate of bismuth. Ure.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Flake

FLAKE, noun [Latin floccus; Gr. flake and flock are doubtless the same word, varied in orthography, and connected perhaps with Latin plico, Gr. The sense is a complication, a crowd, or a lay.]

1. A small collection of snow, as it falls from the clouds or from the air; a little bunch or cluster of snowy crystals, such as fall in still moderate weather. This is a flake lock or flock of snow.

2. A platform of hurdles, or small sticks made fast or interwoven, supported by stanchions, on which cod-fish is dried.

3. A layer or stratum; as a flake of flesh or tallow.

Job 41:23.

4. A collection or little particle of fire, or of combustible matter on fire, separated and flying off.

5. Any scaly matter in layers; any mass cleaving off in scales.

Little flakes of scurf.

6. A sort of carnations of two colors only, having large stripes going through the leaves.

White-flake, in painting, is lead corroded by means of the pressing of grapes, or a ceruse prepared by the acid of grapes. It is brought from Italy, and of a quality superior to common white lead. It is used in oil and varnished painting, when a clean white is required.

FLAKE, verb transitive To form into flakes.

FLAKE, verb intransitive To break or separate in layers; to peel or scale off. We more usually say, to flake off.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

neighborly

NEIGHBORLY, a.

1. Becoming a neighbor; kind; civil.

Judge if this be neighborly dealing.

2. Cultivating familiar intercourse; interchanging frequent visits; social. Friend, you are not neighborly.

NEIGHBORLY, adv. With social civility; as, to live neighborly.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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