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Thursday - May 19, 2022

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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flag

FLAG, v.i. [L. flacceo. See Flaccid. The sense is primarily to bend, or rather to recede, to lag.]

1. To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down as flexible bodies; to be loose and yielding; as the flagging sails.

2. To grow spiritless or dejected; to droop; to grow languid; as, the spirits flag.

3. To grow weak; to lose vigor; as, the strength flags.

4. To become dull or languid.

The pleasures of the town begin to flag.

FLAG, v.t. To let fall into feebleness; to suffer to drop; as, to flag the wings.

FLAG, n. A flat stone, or a pavement of flat stones.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [flag]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FLAG, v.i. [L. flacceo. See Flaccid. The sense is primarily to bend, or rather to recede, to lag.]

1. To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down as flexible bodies; to be loose and yielding; as the flagging sails.

2. To grow spiritless or dejected; to droop; to grow languid; as, the spirits flag.

3. To grow weak; to lose vigor; as, the strength flags.

4. To become dull or languid.

The pleasures of the town begin to flag.

FLAG, v.t. To let fall into feebleness; to suffer to drop; as, to flag the wings.

FLAG, n. A flat stone, or a pavement of flat stones.


FLAG, n.1 [W. llec; Ir. liag, a broad flat stone; allied perhaps to lay.]

A flat stone, or a pavement of flat stones.


FLAG, n.2 [W. llaç, a blade.]

An aquatic plant, with a bladed leaf, probably so called from its bending or yielding to the wind.


FLAG, n.3 [G. flagge; D. vlag, vlagge; Dan. flag; Sw. flagg; allied probably to the preceding word, in the sense of bending or spreading.]

An ensign or colors; a cloth on which are usually painted or wrought certain figures, and borne on a staff. In the army, a banner by which one regiment is distinguished from another. In the marine, a banner or standard by which the ships of one nation are distinguished from those of another, or by which an admiral is distinguished from other ships of his squadron. In the British navy, an admiral's flag is displayed at the main-top-gallant-mast-head, a vice-admiral's at the fore-top-gallant-mast-head, and a rear-admiral's at the mizzen-top-gallant-mast-head. To strike or lower the flag, is to pull it down upon the cap in token of respect or submission. To strike the flag in an engagement, is the sign of surrendering. To hang out the white flag, is to ask quarter; or in some cases, to manifest a friendly design. The red flag, is a sign of defiance or battle. To hang the flag half mast high, is a token or signal of mourning. Flag-officer, an admiral; the commander of a squadron. Flag-ship, the ship which bears the admiral, and in which his flag is displayed. Flag-staff, staff that elevates the flag. Encyc. Mar. Dict.


FLAG, v.i. [W. llacâu, or llaciaw, to relax, to droop; llegu, to flag; L. flacceo; Sp. flaquear; Port fraquear, to flag; Ir. lag, weak. See Flaccid. The sense is primarily to bend, or rather to recede, to lag.]

  1. To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down as flexible bodies; to be loose and yielding; as, the flagging sails. Dryden.
  2. To grow spiritless or dejected; to droop; to grow languid; as, the spirits flag.
  3. To grow weak; to lose vigor; as, the strength flags.
  4. To become dull or languid. The pleasures of the town begin to flag. Swift.

FLAG, v.t.1

To let fall into feebleness; to suffer to drop; as, to flag the wings. Prior.


FLAG, v.t.2

To lay with flat stones. The sides and floor were all flagged with excellent marble. Sandys.


Flag
  1. To hang loose without stiffness] to bend down, as flexible bodies; to be loose, yielding, limp.

    As loose it [the sail] flagged around the mast. T. Moore.

  2. To let droop; to suffer to fall, or let fall, into feebleness; as, to flag the wings.

    prior.
  3. That which flags or hangs down loosely.
  4. To signal to with a flag; as, to flag a train.
  5. An aquatic plant, with long, ensiform leaves, belonging to either of the genera Iris and Acorus.

    Cooper's flag, the cat-tail (Typha latifolia), the long leaves of which are placed between the staves of barrels to make the latter water-tight. -- Corn flag. See under 2d Corn. -- Flag broom, a coarse of broom, originally made of flags or rushes. -- Flag root, the root of the sweet flag. -- Sweet flag. See Calamus, n., 2.

  6. To furnish or deck out with flags.
  7. A flat stone used for paving.

    Woodward.
  8. To lay with flags of flat stones.

    The sides and floor are all flagged with . . . marble. Sandys.

  9. One of the wing feathers next the body of a bird; -- called also flag feather.
  10. To decoy (game) by waving a flag, handkerchief, or the like to arouse the animal's curiosity.

    The antelope are getting continually shyer and more difficult to flag. T. Roosevelt.

  11. To droop; to grow spiritless; to lose vigor; to languish; as, the spirits flag; the streugth flags.

    The pleasures of the town begin to flag. Swift.

    Syn. -- To droop; decline; fail; languish; pine.

  12. To enervate; to exhaust the vigor or elasticity of.

    Nothing so flags the spirits. Echard.

  13. A cloth usually bearing a device or devices and used to indicate nationality, party, etc., or to give or ask information] -- commonly attached to a staff to be waved by the wind; a standard; a banner; an ensign; the colors; as, the national flag; a military or a naval flag.
  14. To convey, as a message, by means of flag signals; as, to flag an order to troops or vessels at a distance.
  15. Any hard, evenly stratified sandstone, which splits into layers suitable for flagstones.
  16. A group of feathers on the lower part of the legs of certain hawks, owls, etc.

    (b)
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Flag

FLAG, verb intransitive [Latin flacceo. See Flaccid. The sense is primarily to bend, or rather to recede, to lag.]

1. To hang loose without stiffness; to bend down as flexible bodies; to be loose and yielding; as the flagging sails.

2. To grow spiritless or dejected; to droop; to grow languid; as, the spirits flag.

3. To grow weak; to lose vigor; as, the strength flags.

4. To become dull or languid.

The pleasures of the town begin to flag.

FLAG, verb transitive To let fall into feebleness; to suffer to drop; as, to flag the wings.

FLAG, noun A flat stone, or a pavement of flat stones.

FLAG, verb transitive To lay with flat stones.

The sides and floor were all flagged with excellent marble.

FLAG, noun An aquatic plant, with a bladed leaf, probably so called from its bending or yielding to the wind.

FLAG, noun

An ensign or colors; a cloth on which are usually painted or wrought certain figures, and borne on a staff. In the army, a banner by which one regiment is distinguished from another. In the marine, a banner or standard by which the ships of one nation are distinguished from those of another, or by which an admiral is distinguished from other ships of his squadron. In the British navy, an admiral's flag is displayed at the main-top-gallant-mast-head, a vice-admiral's at the fore-top-gallant-mast-head, and a rear-admiral's at the mizen-top-gallant-mast-head.

To strike or lower the flag, is to pull it down upon the cap in token of respect or submission. To strike the flag in an engagement, is the sign of surrendering.

To hang out the white flag, is to ask quarter; or in some cases, to manifest a friendly design. The red flag, is a sign of defiance or battle.

To hang the flag half mast high, is a token or signal of mourning.

Flag-officer, an admiral; the commander of a squadron.

Flag-ship, the ship which bears the admiral, and in which his flag is displayed.

Flag-staff, the staff that elevates the flag.

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To keep God's Word in the English language pure and true; I need to know the meaning of the original English word and not the changing, and sometimes the corrupt, word of today.

— Jimmy (Corpus Christi, TX)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

obliteration

OBLITERA'TION, n. The act of effacing; effacement; a blotting out or wearing out; extinction.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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