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Monday - December 17, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [file]

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file

FILE, n. [L. filum. The primary sense is probably to draw out or extend, or to twist.]

1. A thread, string of line; particularly, a line or wire on which papers are strung in due order for preservation, and for conveniently finding them when wanted. Documents are kept on file.

2. The whole number of papers strung on a line or wire; as a file of writs. A file is a record of court.

3. A bundle of papers tied together, with the title of each indorsed; the mode of arranging and keeping papers being changed, without a change of names.

4. A roll, list or catalogue.

5. A row of soldiers ranged one behind another, from front to rear; the number of men constituting the depth of the battalion or squadron.

FILE, v.t.

1. To string; to fasten, as papers, on a line or wire for preservation. Declarations and affidavits must be filed. An original writ may be filed after judgment.

2. To arrange or insert in a bundle, as papers, indorsing the title on each paper. This is now the more common mode of filing papers in public and private offices.

3. To present or exhibit officially, or for trial; as, to file a bill in chancery.

FILE, v.i. To march in a file or line, as soldiers, not abreast, but one after another.

FILE, n.

An instrument used in smoothing and polishing metals, formed of iron or steel, and cut in little furrows.

FILE, v.t.

1. To rub and smooth with a file; to polish.

2. To cut as with a file; to wear off or away by friction; as, to file off a tooth.

3. [from defile.] To foul or defile. [Not used.]



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [file]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FILE, n. [L. filum. The primary sense is probably to draw out or extend, or to twist.]

1. A thread, string of line; particularly, a line or wire on which papers are strung in due order for preservation, and for conveniently finding them when wanted. Documents are kept on file.

2. The whole number of papers strung on a line or wire; as a file of writs. A file is a record of court.

3. A bundle of papers tied together, with the title of each indorsed; the mode of arranging and keeping papers being changed, without a change of names.

4. A roll, list or catalogue.

5. A row of soldiers ranged one behind another, from front to rear; the number of men constituting the depth of the battalion or squadron.

FILE, v.t.

1. To string; to fasten, as papers, on a line or wire for preservation. Declarations and affidavits must be filed. An original writ may be filed after judgment.

2. To arrange or insert in a bundle, as papers, indorsing the title on each paper. This is now the more common mode of filing papers in public and private offices.

3. To present or exhibit officially, or for trial; as, to file a bill in chancery.

FILE, v.i. To march in a file or line, as soldiers, not abreast, but one after another.

FILE, n.

An instrument used in smoothing and polishing metals, formed of iron or steel, and cut in little furrows.

FILE, v.t.

1. To rub and smooth with a file; to polish.

2. To cut as with a file; to wear off or away by friction; as, to file off a tooth.

3. [from defile.] To foul or defile. [Not used.]

FILE, n. [Fr. file, a row; filet, a thread; L. filum; Sp. hilo; Port. fila; It. fila, filo; Russ. biel, a thread of flax. The primary sense is probably to draw out or extend, or to twist. W. filliaw, to twist.]

  1. A thread, string or line; particularly, a line or wire on which papers are strung in due order for preservation, and for conveniently finding them when wanted. Documents are kept on file.
  2. The whole number of papers strung on a line or wire; as, a file of writs. A file is a record of court.
  3. A bundle of papers tied together, with the title of each indorsed; the mode of arranging and keeping papers being changed, without a change of names.
  4. A roll, list or catalogue. Shak.
  5. A row of soldiers ranged one behind another, from front to rear; the number of men constituting the depth of the battalion or squadron.

FILE, n. [Sax. feol; D. vyl; G. feile; Sw. and Dan. fil, a file; Russ. pila, a saw; perhaps connected in origin with polish, – which see. Class Bl, No. 30, 32, 33, 45.]

An instrument used in smoothing and polishing metals, formed of iron or steel, and cut in little furrows.


FILE, v.i.

To march in a file or line, as soldiers not abreast; but one after another.


FILE, v.t.1

  1. To string; to fasten, as papers, on a line or wire for preservation. Declarations and affidavits must be filed. An original writ may be filed after judgment.
  2. To arrange or insert in a bundle, as papers, indorsing the title on each paper. This is now the more common mode of filing papers in public and private offices.
  3. To present or exhibit officially, or for trial; as, to file a bill in chancery.

FILE, v.t.2 [Russ. opilevayu, and spilivayu, to file.]

  1. To rub and smooth with a file; to polish.
  2. To cut as with a file; to wear off or away by friction; as to file off a tooth.
  3. [from Defile.] To foul or defile. [Not used.] Shak.

File
  1. An orderly succession] a line; a row

    ; as: (a) (Mil)
  2. To set in order] to arrange, or lay away, esp. as papers in a methodical manner for preservation and reverence; to place on file; to insert in its proper place in an arranged body of papers.

    I would have my several courses and my dishes well filed. Beau. *** Fl.

  3. To march in a file or line, as soldiers, not abreast, but one after another; -- generally with off.

    To file with, to follow closely, as one soldier after another in file; to keep pace.

    My endeavors
    Have ever come too short of my desires,
    Yet filed with my abilities.
    Shak.

  4. A steel instrument, having cutting ridges or teeth, made by indentation with a chisel, used for abrading or smoothing other substances, as metals, wood, etc.

    * A file differs from a rasp in having the furrows made by straight cuts of a chisel, either single or crossed, while the rasp has coarse, single teeth, raised by the pyramidal end of a triangular punch.

  5. To rub, smooth, or cut away, with a file; to sharpen with a file; as, to file a saw or a tooth.
  6. To make foul; to defile.

    [Obs.]

    All his hairy breast with blood was filed. Spenser.

    For Banquo's issue have I filed my mind. Shak.

  7. Course of thought; thread of narration.

    [Obs.]

    Let me resume the file of my narration. Sir H. Wotton.

    File firing, the act of firing by file, or each file independently of others. -- File leader, the soldier at the front of any file, who covers and leads those in rear of him. -- File marching, the marching of a line two deep, when faced to the right or left, so that the front and rear rank march side by side. Brande *** C. --Indian file, or Single file, a line of men marching one behind another] a single row. -- On file, preserved in an orderly collection. -- Rank and file. (a) The body of soldiers constituing the mass of an army, including corporals and privates. Wilhelm. (b) Those who constitute the bulk or working members of a party, society, etc., in distinction from the leaders.

  8. To bring before a court or legislative body by presenting proper papers in a regular way] as, to file a petition or bill.

    Burrill.
  9. Anything employed to smooth, polish, or rasp, literally or figuratively.

    Mock the nice touches of the critic's file. Akenside.

  10. To smooth or polish as with a file.

    Shak.

    File your tongue to a little more courtesy. Sir W. Scott.

  11. To put upon the files or among the records of a court; to note on (a paper) the fact date of its reception in court.

    To file a paper, on the part of a party, is to place it in the official custody of the clerk. To file, on the part of the clerk, is to indorse upon the paper the date of its reception, and retain it in his office, subject to inspection by whomsoever it may concern. Burrill.

  12. A shrewd or artful person.

    [Slang] Fielding.

    Will is an old file in spite of his smooth face. Thackeray.

    Bastard file, Cross file, etc. See under Bastard, Cross, etc. -- Cross-cut file, a file having two sets of teeth crossing obliquely. -- File blank, a steel blank shaped and ground ready for cutting to form a file. -- File cutter, a maker of files. -- Second-cut file, a file having teeth of a grade next finer than bastard. -- Single-cut file, a file having only one set of parallel teeth; a float. -- Smooth file, a file having teeth so fine as to make an almost smooth surface.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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File

FILE, noun [Latin filum. The primary sense is probably to draw out or extend, or to twist.]

1. A thread, string of line; particularly, a line or wire on which papers are strung in due order for preservation, and for conveniently finding them when wanted. Documents are kept on file

2. The whole number of papers strung on a line or wire; as a file of writs. A file is a record of court.

3. A bundle of papers tied together, with the title of each indorsed; the mode of arranging and keeping papers being changed, without a change of names.

4. A roll, list or catalogue.

5. A row of soldiers ranged one behind another, from front to rear; the number of men constituting the depth of the battalion or squadron.

FILE, verb transitive

1. To string; to fasten, as papers, on a line or wire for preservation. Declarations and affidavits must be filed. An original writ may be filed after judgment.

2. To arrange or insert in a bundle, as papers, indorsing the title on each paper. This is now the more common mode of filing papers in public and private offices.

3. To present or exhibit officially, or for trial; as, to file a bill in chancery.

FILE, verb intransitive To march in a file or line, as soldiers, not abreast, but one after another.

FILE, noun

An instrument used in smoothing and polishing metals, formed of iron or steel, and cut in little furrows.

FILE, verb transitive

1. To rub and smooth with a file; to polish.

2. To cut as with a file; to wear off or away by friction; as, to file off a tooth.

3. [from defile.] To foul or defile. [Not used.]

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— Karen (New Braunfels, TX)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

antiscorbutic

ANTISCORBU'TIC, a. [anti and scorbutic.] which see.]

Counteracting the scurvy.

ANTISCORBU'TIC, n. A remedy for the scurvy.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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