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Monday - December 10, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [field]

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field

FIELD, n.

1. A piece of land inclosed for tillage or pasture; any part of a farm, except the garden and appurtenances of the mansion; properly land not covered with wood, and more strictly applicable to tillage land than to mowing land, which is often called meadow. But we say, the master of the house is in the field with his laborers, when he is at a distance from his house on his farm. He is in the field, plowing, sowing, reaping or making hay.

2. Ground not inclosed.

3. The ground where a battle is fought.

We say, the field of battle; these veterans are excellent soldiers in the field.

4. A battle; action in the field.

What though the field be lost.

5. To keep the field, is to keep the campaign open; to live in tents, or to be in a state of active operations. At the approach of cold weather, the troops, unable to keep the field, were ordered into winter quarters.

6. A wide expanse.

Ask of yonder argent fields above.

7. Open space for action or operation; compass; extent. This subject opens a wide field for contemplation.

8. A piece or tract of land.

The field I give thee and the cave that is therein.

Gen. 23.

9. The ground or blank space on which figures are drawn; as the field or ground of a picture.

10. In heraldry, the whole surface of the shield, or the continent.

11. In scripture, field often signifies the open country, ground not inclosed, as it may in some countries in modern times.

12. A field of ice, a large body of floating ice.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [field]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FIELD, n.

1. A piece of land inclosed for tillage or pasture; any part of a farm, except the garden and appurtenances of the mansion; properly land not covered with wood, and more strictly applicable to tillage land than to mowing land, which is often called meadow. But we say, the master of the house is in the field with his laborers, when he is at a distance from his house on his farm. He is in the field, plowing, sowing, reaping or making hay.

2. Ground not inclosed.

3. The ground where a battle is fought.

We say, the field of battle; these veterans are excellent soldiers in the field.

4. A battle; action in the field.

What though the field be lost.

5. To keep the field, is to keep the campaign open; to live in tents, or to be in a state of active operations. At the approach of cold weather, the troops, unable to keep the field, were ordered into winter quarters.

6. A wide expanse.

Ask of yonder argent fields above.

7. Open space for action or operation; compass; extent. This subject opens a wide field for contemplation.

8. A piece or tract of land.

The field I give thee and the cave that is therein.

Gen. 23.

9. The ground or blank space on which figures are drawn; as the field or ground of a picture.

10. In heraldry, the whole surface of the shield, or the continent.

11. In scripture, field often signifies the open country, ground not inclosed, as it may in some countries in modern times.

12. A field of ice, a large body of floating ice.

FIELD, n. [Sax. feld; G. feld; D. veld; Sw. and Dan. felt; probably level land, a plain, from D. vellen, to fell, to lay or throw down.]

  1. A piece of land inclosed for tillage or pasture; any part of a farm, except the garden and appurtenances of the mansion; properly, land not covered with wood, and more strictly applicable to tillage land than to mowing land, which is often called meadow. But we say, the master of the house is in the field with his laborers, when he is at a distance from his house on his farm. He is in the field, plowing, sowing, reaping or making hay.
  2. Ground not inclosed. Mortimer.
  3. The ground where a battle is fought. We say, the field of battle; these veterans are excellent soldiers in the field.
  4. A battle; action in the field. What though the field be lost.
  5. To keep the field, is to keep the campaign open; to live in tents, or to be in a state of active operations. At the approach of cold weather, the troops, unable to keep the field, were ordered into winter quarters.
  6. A wide expanse. Ask of yonder a great field above. Pope.
  7. Open space for action or operation; compass; extent. This subject opens a wide field for contemplation.
  8. A piece or tract of land. The field I give thee and the cave that is therein. Gen. xxiii.
  9. The ground or blank space on which figures are drawn; as, the field or ground of a picture. Dryden.
  10. In heraldry, the whole surface of the shield, or the continent. Encyc.
  11. In Scripture, field often signifies the open country ground not inclosed, as it may in some countries in modern times.
  12. A field of ice, a large body of floating ice.

Field
  1. Cleared land; land suitable for tillage or pasture; cultivated ground; the open country.
  2. To take the field.

    [Obs.] Spenser.
  3. To catch, stop, throw, etc. (the ball), as a fielder.
  4. A piece of land of considerable size; esp., a piece inclosed for tillage or pasture.

    Fields which promise corn and wine. Byron.

  5. To stand out in the field, ready to catch, stop, or throw the ball.
  6. A place where a battle is fought; also, the battle itself.

    In this glorious and well-foughten field. Shak.

    What though the field be lost? Milton.

  7. An open space; an extent; an expanse.

    Esp.: (a)
  8. The whole surface of an escutcheon; also, so much of it is shown unconcealed by the different bearings upon it. See Illust. of Fess, where the field is represented as gules (red), while the fess is argent (silver).
  9. An unresticted or favorable opportunity for action, operation, or achievement; province; room.

    Afforded a clear field for moral experiments. Macaulay.

  10. A collective term for all the competitors in any outdoor contest or trial, or for all except the favorites in the betting.
  11. That part of the grounds reserved for the players which is outside of the diamond; -- called also outfield.

    * Field is often used adjectively in the sense of belonging to, or used in, the fields; especially with reference to the operations and equipments of an army during a campaign away from permanent camps and fortifications. In most cases such use of the word is sufficiently clear; as, field battery; field fortification; field gun; field hospital, etc. A field geologist, naturalist, etc., is one who makes investigations or collections out of doors. A survey uses a field book for recording field notes, i.e., measurment, observations, etc., made in field work (outdoor operations). A farmer or planter employs field hands, and may use a field roller or a field derrick. Field sports are hunting, fishing, athletic games, etc.

    Coal field (Geol.) See under Coal. -- Field artillery, light ordnance mounted on wheels, for the use of a marching army. -- Field basil (Bot.), a plant of the Mint family (Calamintha Acinos); -- called also basil thyme. -- Field colors (Mil.), small flags for marking out the positions for squadrons and battalions; camp colors. -- Field cricket (Zoöl.), a large European cricket (Gryllus campestric), remarkable for its loud notes. -- Field day. (a) A day in the fields. (b) (Mil.) A day when troops are taken into the field for instruction in evolutions. Farrow. (c) A day of unusual exertion or display; a gala day. -- Field driver, in New England, an officer charged with the driving of stray cattle to the pound. - - Field duck (Zoöl.), the little bustard (Otis tetrax), found in Southern Europe. -- Field glass. (Optics) (a) A binocular telescope of compact form; a lorgnette; a race glass. (b) A small achromatic telescope, from 20 to 24 inches long, and having 3 to 6 draws. (c) See Field lens. -- Field lark. (Zoöl.) (a) The skylark. (b) The tree pipit. -- Field lens (Optics), that one of the two lenses forming the eyepiece of an astronomical telescope or compound microscope which is nearer the object glass; -- called also field glass. -- Field madder (Bot.), a plant (Sherardia arvensis) used in dyeing. -- Field marshal (Mil.), the highest military rank conferred in the British and other European armies. -- Field mouse (Zoöl.), a mouse inhabiting fields, as the campagnol and the deer mouse. See Campagnol, and Deer mouse. -- Field officer (Mil.), an officer above the rank of captain and below that of general. -- Field officer's court (U.S.Army), a court-martial consisting of one field officer empowered to try all cases, in time of war, subject to jurisdiction of garrison and regimental courts. Farrow. -- Field plover (Zoöl.), the black-bellied plover (Charadrius squatarola); also sometimes applied to the Bartramian sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda). -- Field spaniel (Zoöl.), a small spaniel used in hunting small game. -- Field sparrow. (Zoöl.) (a) A small American sparrow (Spizella pusilla). (b) The hedge sparrow. [Eng.] -- Field staff> (Mil.), a staff formerly used by gunners to hold a lighted match for discharging a gun. -- Field vole (Zoöl.), the European meadow mouse. -- Field of ice, a large body of floating ice; a pack. -- Field, or Field of view, in a telescope or microscope, the entire space within which objects are seen. -- Field magnet. see under Magnet. -- Magnetic field. See Magnetic. -- To back the field, or To bet on the field. See under Back, v. t. -- To keep the field. (a) (Mil.) To continue a campaign. (b) To maintain one's ground against all comers. -- To lay, or back, against the field, to bet on (a horse, etc.) against all comers. -- To take the field (Mil.), to enter upon a campaign.

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Field

FIELD, noun

1. A piece of land inclosed for tillage or pasture; any part of a farm, except the garden and appurtenances of the mansion; properly land not covered with wood, and more strictly applicable to tillage land than to mowing land, which is often called meadow. But we say, the master of the house is in the field with his laborers, when he is at a distance from his house on his farm. He is in the field plowing, sowing, reaping or making hay.

2. Ground not inclosed.

3. The ground where a battle is fought.

We say, the field of battle; these veterans are excellent soldiers in the field

4. A battle; action in the field

What though the field be lost.

5. To keep the field is to keep the campaign open; to live in tents, or to be in a state of active operations. At the approach of cold weather, the troops, unable to keep the field were ordered into winter quarters.

6. A wide expanse.

Ask of yonder argent fields above.

7. Open space for action or operation; compass; extent. This subject opens a wide field for contemplation.

8. A piece or tract of land.

The field I give thee and the cave that is therein.

Genesis 23:9.

9. The ground or blank space on which figures are drawn; as the field or ground of a picture.

10. In heraldry, the whole surface of the shield, or the continent.

11. In scripture, field often signifies the open country, ground not inclosed, as it may in some countries in modern times.

12. A field of ice, a large body of floating ice.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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costiveness

COSTIVENESS, n. A preternatural detention of the fecal matter of the bowels, with hardness and dryness; an obstruction or preternatural slowness of evacuations from the bowels.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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