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Sunday - December 16, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [feather]

Evolution (or devolution) of this word [feather]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FEATH'ER,

N / A

Feath"er
  1. One of the peculiar dermal appendages, of several kinds, belonging to birds, as contour feathers, quills, and down.

    * An ordinary feather consists of the quill or hollow basal part of the stem; the shaft or rachis, forming the upper, solid part of the stem; the vanes or webs, implanted on the rachis and consisting of a series of slender laminæ or barbs, which usually bear barbules, which in turn usually bear barbicels and interlocking hooks by which they are fastened together. See Down, Quill, Plumage.

  2. To furnish with a feather or feathers, as an arrow or a cap.

    An eagle had the ill hap to be struck with an arrow feathered from her own wing. L'Estrange.

  3. To grow or form feathers; to become feathered; -- often with out; as, the birds are feathering out.
  4. Kind; nature; species; -- from the proverbial phrase, "Birds of a feather," that is, of the same species.

    [R.]

    I am not of that feather to shake off
    My friend when he must need me.
    Shak.

  5. To adorn, as with feathers] to fringe.

    A few birches and oaks still feathered the narrow ravines. Sir W. Scott.

  6. To curdle when poured into another liquid, and float about in little flakes or "feathers;" as, the cream feathers.

    [Colloq.]
  7. The fringe of long hair on the legs of the setter and some other dogs.
  8. To render light as a feather; to give wings to.

    [R.]

    The Polonian story perhaps may feather some tedious hours. Loveday.

  9. To turn to a horizontal plane; -- said of oars.

    The feathering oar returns the gleam. Tickell.

    Stopping his sculls in the air to feather accurately. Macmillan's Mag.

  10. A tuft of peculiar, long, frizzly hair on a horse.
  11. To enrich; to exalt; to benefit.

    They stuck not to say that the king cared not to plume his nobility and people to feather himself. Bacon. Dryden.

  12. To have the appearance of a feather or of feathers; to be or to appear in feathery form.

    A clump of ancient cedars feathering in evergreen beauty down to the ground. Warren.

    The ripple feathering from her bows. Tennyson.

  13. One of the fins or wings on the shaft of an arrow.
  14. To tread, as a cock.

    Dryden.

    To feather one's nest, to provide for one's self especially from property belonging to another, confided to one's care; -- an expression taken from the practice of birds which collect feathers for the lining of their nests. -- To feather an oar (Naut), to turn it when it leaves the water so that the blade will be horizontal and offer the least resistance to air while reaching for another stroke. -- To tar and feather a person, to smear him with tar and cover him with feathers, as a punishment or an indignity.

  15. A longitudinal strip projecting as a fin from an object, to strengthen it, or to enter a channel in another object and thereby prevent displacement sidwise but permit motion lengthwise] a spline.
  16. A thin wedge driven between the two semicylindrical parts of a divided plug in a hole bored in a stone, to rend the stone.

    Knight.
  17. The angular adjustment of an oar or paddle-wheel float, with reference to a horizontal axis, as it leaves or enters the water.

    * Feather is used adjectively or in combination, meaning composed of, or resembling, a feather or feathers; as, feather fan, feather-heeled, feather duster.

    Feather alum (Min.), a hydrous sulphate of alumina, resulting from volcanic action, and from the decomposition of iron pyrites; -- called also halotrichite. Ure. -- Feather bed, a bed filled with feathers. -- Feather driver, one who prepares feathers by beating. -- Feather duster, a dusting brush of feathers. -- Feather flower, an artifical flower made of feathers, for ladies' headdresses, and other ornamental purposes. -- Feather grass (Bot.), a kind of grass (Stipa pennata) which has a long feathery awn rising from one of the chaffy scales which inclose the grain. -- Feather maker, one who makes plumes, etc., of feathers, real or artificial. -- Feather ore (Min.), a sulphide of antimony and lead, sometimes found in capillary forms and like a cobweb, but also massive. It is a variety of Jamesonite. -- Feather shot, or Feathered shot (Metal.), copper granulated by pouring into cold water. Raymond. -- Feather spray (Naut.), the spray thrown up, like pairs of feathers, by the cutwater of a fast-moving vessel. -- Feather star. (Zoöl.) See Comatula. -- Feather weight. (Racing) (a) Scrupulously exact weight, so that a feather would turn the scale, when a jockey is weighed or weighted. (b) The lightest weight that can be put on the back of a horse in racing. Youatt. (c) In wrestling, boxing, etc., a term applied to the lightest of the classes into which contestants are divided; -- in contradistinction to light weight, middle weight, and heavy weight. -- A feather in the cap an honour, trophy, or mark of distinction. [Colloq.] -- To be in full feather, to be in full dress or in one's best clothes. [Collog.] -- To be in high feather, to be in high spirits. [Collog.] -- To cut a feather. (a) (Naut.) To make the water foam in moving; in allusion to the ripple which a ship throws off from her bows. (b) To make one's self conspicuous. [Colloq.] -- To show the white feather, to betray cowardice, -- a white feather in the tail of a cock being considered an indication that he is not of the true game breed.

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Feather

FEATH'ER,

FEATH'ER-BED

FEATH'ER-DRIVER,

FEATH'ER-FEW, A corruption of feverfew.

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Sound Christian Foundation

— Martha (Glenmont, OH)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

carunculated

CARUNCULATED, a. Having a fleshy excrescence, or soft fleshy protuberance.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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