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Friday - December 14, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [fate]

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fate

FATE, n. [L. fatum, from for, fari, to speak, whence fatus.]

1. Primarily, a decree or word pronounced by God; or a fixed sentence by which the order of things is prescribed. Hence, inevitable necessity; destiny depending on a superior cause and uncontrollable. According to the Stoics, every event is determined by fate.

Necessity or chancenot me; and what I will is fate.

2. Event predetermined; lot; destiny. It is our fate to meet with disappointments.

It is the fate of mortals.

Tell me what fates attend the duke of Suffolk?

3. Final event; death; destruction.

Yet still he chose the longest way to fate.

The whizzing arrow sings,

And bears thy fate, Antinous, on its wings.

4. Cause of death. Dryden calls an arrow a feathered fate.

Divine fate, the order or determination of God; providence.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [fate]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FATE, n. [L. fatum, from for, fari, to speak, whence fatus.]

1. Primarily, a decree or word pronounced by God; or a fixed sentence by which the order of things is prescribed. Hence, inevitable necessity; destiny depending on a superior cause and uncontrollable. According to the Stoics, every event is determined by fate.

Necessity or chancenot me; and what I will is fate.

2. Event predetermined; lot; destiny. It is our fate to meet with disappointments.

It is the fate of mortals.

Tell me what fates attend the duke of Suffolk?

3. Final event; death; destruction.

Yet still he chose the longest way to fate.

The whizzing arrow sings,

And bears thy fate, Antinous, on its wings.

4. Cause of death. Dryden calls an arrow a feathered fate.

Divine fate, the order or determination of God; providence.

FATE, n. [L. fatum, from for, fari, to speak, whence fatus.]

  1. Primarily, a decree or word pronounced by God, or a fixed sentence by which the order of things is prescribed. Hence, inevitable necessity; destiny depending on a superior cause and uncontrollable. According to the Stoics, every event is determined by fate. Necessity or chance / Approach not me; and what I will is fate. Milton.
  2. Event predetermined; lot; destiny. It is our fate to meet with disappointments. It is the fate of mortals. Tell me what fates attend the Duke Suffolk. Shak.
  3. Final event; death; destruction. Yet still he chose the longest way to fate. Dryden. The whizzing arrow sings, / And bears thy fate, Antinous, on its wings. Pope.
  4. Cause of death. Dryden calls an arrow a feathered fate. Divine fate, the order or determination of God; providence. Encyc.

Fate
  1. A fixed decree by which the order of things is prescribed; the immutable law of the universe; inevitable necessity; the force by which all existence is determined and conditioned.

    Necessity and chance
    Approach not me; and what I will is fate.
    Milton.

    Beyond and above the Olympian gods lay the silent, brooding, everlasting fate of which victim and tyrant were alike the instruments. Froude.

  2. Appointed lot; allotted life; arranged or predetermined event; destiny; especially, the final lot; doom; ruin; death.

    The great, th'important day, big with the fate
    Of Cato and of Rome.
    Addison.

    Our wills and fates do so contrary run
    That our devices still are overthrown.
    Shak.

    The whizzing arrow sings,
    And bears thy fate, Antinous, on its wings.
    Pope.

  3. The element of chance in the affairs of life; the unforeseen and unestimated conitions considered as a force shaping events; fortune; esp., opposing circumstances against which it is useless to struggle; as, fate was, or the fates were, against him.

    A brave man struggling in the storms of fate. Pope.

    Sometimes an hour of Fate's serenest weather strikes through our changeful sky its coming beams. B. Taylor.

  4. The three goddesses, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos, sometimes called the Destinies, or Parcæwho were supposed to determine the course of human life. They are represented, one as holding the distaff, a second as spinning, and the third as cutting off the thread.

    * Among all nations it has been common to speak of fate or destiny as a power superior to gods and men -- swaying all things irresistibly. This may be called the fate of poets and mythologists. Philosophical fate is the sum of the laws of the universe, the product of eternal intelligence and the blind properties of matter. Theological fate represents Deity as above the laws of nature, and ordaining all things according to his will -- the expression of that will being the law. Krauth- Fleming.

    Syn. -- Destiny; lot; doom; fortune; chance.

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Fate

FATE, noun [Latin fatum, from for, fari, to speak, whence fatus.]

1. Primarily, a decree or word pronounced by God; or a fixed sentence by which the order of things is prescribed. Hence, inevitable necessity; destiny depending on a superior cause and uncontrollable. According to the Stoics, every event is determined by fate

Necessity or chancenot me; and what I will is fate

2. Event predetermined; lot; destiny. It is our fate to meet with disappointments.

It is the fate of mortals.

Tell me what fates attend the duke of Suffolk?

3. Final event; death; destruction.

Yet still he chose the longest way to fate

The whizzing arrow sings,

And bears thy fate Antinous, on its wings.

4. Cause of death. Dryden calls an arrow a feathered fate

Divine fate the order or determination of God; providence.

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— Nita

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

mediatrix

MEDIA'TRIX, n. A female mediator.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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