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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [fancy]

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fancy

FAN'CY, n. [contracted from fantasy, L. phantasia. Gr. from to cause to appear, to seem, to imagine, from to show, to appear, to shine. The primary sense seems to be to open, or to shoot forth.]

1. The faculty by which the mind forms images or representations of things at pleasure. It is often used as synonymous with imagination; but imagination is rather the power of combining and modifying our conceptions.

2. An opinion or notion.

I have always had a fancy, that learning might be made a play and recreation to children.

3. Taste; conception.

The little chapel called the salutation in very neat, and built with a pretty fancy.

4. Image; conception; thought.

How now, my lord, why do you keep alone;

Of sorriest fancies your companions making?

5. Inclination; liking. Take that which suits your fancy.
How does this strike your fancy?

His fancy lay to traveling.

6. Love.

Tell me where is fancy bred.

7. Caprice; humor; whim; as an odd or strange fancy.

True worth shall gain me, that it may be said,

Desert, not fancy, once a woman led.

8. False notion.

9. Something that pleases or entertains without real use or value.

London-pride is a pretty fancy for borders.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [fancy]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FAN'CY, n. [contracted from fantasy, L. phantasia. Gr. from to cause to appear, to seem, to imagine, from to show, to appear, to shine. The primary sense seems to be to open, or to shoot forth.]

1. The faculty by which the mind forms images or representations of things at pleasure. It is often used as synonymous with imagination; but imagination is rather the power of combining and modifying our conceptions.

2. An opinion or notion.

I have always had a fancy, that learning might be made a play and recreation to children.

3. Taste; conception.

The little chapel called the salutation in very neat, and built with a pretty fancy.

4. Image; conception; thought.

How now, my lord, why do you keep alone;

Of sorriest fancies your companions making?

5. Inclination; liking. Take that which suits your fancy.
How does this strike your fancy?

His fancy lay to traveling.

6. Love.

Tell me where is fancy bred.

7. Caprice; humor; whim; as an odd or strange fancy.

True worth shall gain me, that it may be said,

Desert, not fancy, once a woman led.

8. False notion.

9. Something that pleases or entertains without real use or value.

London-pride is a pretty fancy for borders.

FAN'CY, n. [contracted from fantasy. L. phantasia, Gr. φαντασια, from φανταζω, to cause to appear, to seem, to imagine, from φαινω, to show, to appear, to shine. The primary sense seems to be to open, or to shoot forth. Ar. بَانَ baina, to open, to appear; or فَعَنَ faana, to open or expand. Class Bn, No. 3, 28.]

  1. The faculty by which the mind forms images or representations of things at pleasure. It is often used as synonymous with imagination; but imagination is rather the power of combining and modifying our conceptions. Stewart.
  2. An opinion or notion. I have always had a fancy, that learning might be made a play and recreation to children. Locke.
  3. Taste; conception. The little chapel called the Salutation is very neat, and built with a pretty fancy. Addison.
  4. Image; conception; thought. How now, my lord, why do you keep alone; / Of sorriest fancies your companions making? Shak.
  5. Inclination; liking. Take that which suits your fancy. How does this strike your fancy? His fancy lay to traveling. L'Estrange.
  6. Love. Tell me where is fancy bred. Shak.
  7. Caprice; humor; whim; as, an odd or strange fancy. True worth shall gain me, that it may be said, / Desert, not fancy, once a woman led. Dryden.
  8. False notion. Bacon.
  9. Something that pleases or entertains without real use or value. London-pride is a pretty fancy for borders. Mortimer.

FAN'CY, v.i.

To imagine; to figure to one's self; to believe or suppose without proof. All may not be our enemies whom we fancy to be so. If our search has reached no farther than simile and metaphor, we rather fancy than know. Locke.


FAN'CY, v.t.

  1. To form a conception of; to portray in the mind; to imagine. He whom I fancy, but can ne'er express. Dryden.
  2. To like; to be pleased with, particularly on account of external appearance or manners. We fancy a person for beauty and accomplishment. We sometimes fancy a lady at first sight, whom, on acquaintance, we cannot esteem.

Fan"cy
  1. The faculty by which the mind forms an image or a representation of anything perceived before; the power of combining and modifying such objects into new pictures or images; the power of readily and happily creating and recalling such objects for the purpose of amusement, wit, or embellishment; imagination.

    In the soul
    Are many lesser faculties, that serve
    Reason as chief. Among these fancy next
    Her office holds.
    Milton.

  2. To figure to one's self; to believe or imagine something without proof.

    If our search has reached no farther than simile and metaphor, we rather fancy than know. Locke.

  3. To form a conception of; to portray in the mind; to imagine.

    He whom I fancy, but can ne'er express. Dryden.

  4. Adapted to please the fancy or taste; ornamental; as, fancy goods.
  5. An image or representation of anything formed in the mind; conception; thought; idea; conceit.

    How now, my lord ! why do you keep alone,
    Of sorriest fancies your companoins making ?
    Shak.

  6. To love.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  7. To have a fancy for; to like; to be pleased with, particularly on account of external appearance or manners.

    "We fancy not the cardinal." Shak.
  8. Extravagant; above real value.

    This anxiety never degenerated into a monomania, like that which led his [Frederick the Great's] father to pay fancy prices for giants. Macaulay.

    Fancy ball, a ball in which porsons appear in fanciful dresses in imitation of the costumes of different persons and nations. -- Fancy fair, a fair at which articles of fancy and ornament are sold, generally for some charitable purpose. -- Fancy goods, fabrics of various colors, patterns, etc., as ribbons, silks, laces, etc., in distinction from those of a simple or plain color or make. -- Fancy line (Naut.), a line rove through a block at the jaws of a gaff; -- used to haul it down. -- Fancy roller (Carding Machine), a clothed cylinder (usually having straight teeth) in front of the doffer. -- Fancy stocks, a species of stocks which afford great opportunity for stock gambling, since they have no intrinsic value, and the fluctuations in their prices are artificial. -- Fancy store, one where articles of fancy and ornament are sold. -- Fancy woods, the more rare and expensive furniture woods, as mahogany, satinwood, rosewood, etc.

  9. An opinion or notion formed without much reflection; caprice; whim; impression.

    I have always had a fancy that learning might be made a play and recreation to children. Locke.

  10. To believe without sufficient evidence; to imagine (something which is unreal).

    He fancied he was welcome, because those arounde him were his kinsmen. Thackeray.

  11. Inclination; liking, formed by caprice rather than reason; as, to strike one's fancy; hence, the object of inclination or liking.

    To fit your fancies to your father's will. Shak.

  12. That which pleases or entertains the taste or caprice without much use or value.

    London pride is a pretty fancy for borders. Mortimer.

  13. A sort of love song or light impromptu ballad.

    [Obs.] Shak.

    The fancy, all of a class who exhibit and cultivate any peculiar taste or fancy; hence, especially, sporting characters taken collectively, or any specific class of them, as jockeys, gamblers, prize fighters, etc.

    At a great book sale in London, which had congregated all the fancy. De Quincey.

    Syn. -- Imagination; conceit; taste; humor; inclination; whim; liking. See Imagination.

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Fancy

FAN'CY, noun [contracted from fantasy, Latin phantasia. Gr. from to cause to appear, to seem, to imagine, from to show, to appear, to shine. The primary sense seems to be to open, or to shoot forth.]

1. The faculty by which the mind forms images or representations of things at pleasure. It is often used as synonymous with imagination; but imagination is rather the power of combining and modifying our conceptions.

2. An opinion or notion.

I have always had a fancy that learning might be made a play and recreation to children.

3. Taste; conception.

The little chapel called the salutation in very neat, and built with a pretty fancy

4. Image; conception; thought.

How now, my lord, why do you keep alone;

Of sorriest fancies your companions making?

5. Inclination; liking. Take that which suits your fancy

How does this strike your fancy?

His fancy lay to traveling.

6. Love.

Tell me where is fancy bred.

7. Caprice; humor; whim; as an odd or strange fancy

True worth shall gain me, that it may be said,

Desert, not fancy once a woman led.

8. False notion.

9. Something that pleases or entertains without real use or value.

London-pride is a pretty fancy for borders.

FAN'CY, verb intransitive To imagine; to figure to one's self; to believe or suppose without proof. All may not be our enemies whom we fancy to be so.

If our search has reached no farther than simile and metaphor, we rather fancy than know.

FAN'CY, verb transitive

1. To form a conception of; to portray in the mind; to imagine.

He whom I fancy but can ne'er express.

2. To like; to be pleased with, particularly on account of external appearance or manners. We fancy a person for beauty and accomplishment. We sometimes fancy a lady at first sight, whom, on acquaintance, we cannot esteem.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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unilluminated

UNILLU'MINATED, a.

1. Not illuminated; not enlightened; dark.

2. Ignorant.

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