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Friday - December 14, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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false

FALSE, a. [L. falsus, from fallo, to deceive. See Fall and Fail.]

1. Not true; not conformable to fact; expressing what is contrary to that which exists, is done, said or thought. A false report communicates what is not done or said. A false accusation imputes to a person what he has not done or said. A false witness testifies what is not true. A false opinion is not according to truth or fact. The word is applicable to any subject, physical or moral.

2. Not well founded; as a false claim.

3. Not true; not according to the lawful standard; as a false weight or measure.

4. Substituted for another; succedaneous; supposititious; as a false bottom.

5. Counterfeit; forged; not genuine; as false coin; a false bill or note.

6. Not solid or sound; deceiving expectations; as a false foundation

False and slippery ground.

7. Not agreeable to rule or propriety; as false construction in language.

8. Not honest or just; not fair; as false play.

9. Not faithful or loyal; treacherous; perfidious; deceitful. The king's subjects may prove false to him. So we say, a false heart.

10. Unfaithful; inconstant; as a false friend; a false lover; false to promises and vows.

The husband and wife proved false to each other.

11. Deceitful; treacherous; betraying secrets.

12. Counterfeit; not genuine or real; as a false diamond.

13. Hypocritical; feigned; made or assumed for the purpose of deception; as false tears; false modesty. The man appears in false colors. The advocate gave the subject a false coloring.

False fire, a blue flame, made by the burning of certain combustibles, in a wooden tube; used as a signal during the night.

False imprisonment, the arrest and imprisonment of a person without warrant or cause, or contrary to law; or the unlawful detaining of a person in custody.

FALSE, adv. Not truly; not honestly; falsely.

FALSE, v.t.

1. To violate by failure of veracity; to deceive. Obs.

2. To defeat; to balk; to evade. Obs.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [false]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

FALSE, a. [L. falsus, from fallo, to deceive. See Fall and Fail.]

1. Not true; not conformable to fact; expressing what is contrary to that which exists, is done, said or thought. A false report communicates what is not done or said. A false accusation imputes to a person what he has not done or said. A false witness testifies what is not true. A false opinion is not according to truth or fact. The word is applicable to any subject, physical or moral.

2. Not well founded; as a false claim.

3. Not true; not according to the lawful standard; as a false weight or measure.

4. Substituted for another; succedaneous; supposititious; as a false bottom.

5. Counterfeit; forged; not genuine; as false coin; a false bill or note.

6. Not solid or sound; deceiving expectations; as a false foundation

False and slippery ground.

7. Not agreeable to rule or propriety; as false construction in language.

8. Not honest or just; not fair; as false play.

9. Not faithful or loyal; treacherous; perfidious; deceitful. The king's subjects may prove false to him. So we say, a false heart.

10. Unfaithful; inconstant; as a false friend; a false lover; false to promises and vows.

The husband and wife proved false to each other.

11. Deceitful; treacherous; betraying secrets.

12. Counterfeit; not genuine or real; as a false diamond.

13. Hypocritical; feigned; made or assumed for the purpose of deception; as false tears; false modesty. The man appears in false colors. The advocate gave the subject a false coloring.

False fire, a blue flame, made by the burning of certain combustibles, in a wooden tube; used as a signal during the night.

False imprisonment, the arrest and imprisonment of a person without warrant or cause, or contrary to law; or the unlawful detaining of a person in custody.

FALSE, adv. Not truly; not honestly; falsely.

FALSE, v.t.

1. To violate by failure of veracity; to deceive. Obs.

2. To defeat; to balk; to evade. Obs.

FALSE, a. [L. falsus, from fallo, to deceive; Sp. falso; It. id.; Fr. faux, fausse; Sax. false; D. valsch; G. falsch; Sw. and Dan. falsk; W. fals; Ir. falsa. See Fall and Fail.]

  1. Not true; not conformable to fact; expressing what is contrary to that which exists, is done, said or thought. A false report communicates what is not done or said. A false accusation imputes to a person what he has not done or said. A false witness testifies what is not true. A false opinion is not according to truth or fact. The word is applicable to any subject physical or moral.
  2. Not well founded; as, a false claim.
  3. Not true; not according to the lawful standard; as, a false weight or measure.
  4. Substituted for another; succedaneous; supposititious; as, a false bottom.
  5. Counterfeit; forged; not genuine; as, false coin; a false bill or note.
  6. Not solid or sound; deceiving expectations; as, a false foundation. False and slippery ground. Dryden.
  7. Not agreeable to rule or propriety; as, false construction in language.
  8. Not honest or just; not fair; as, false play.
  9. Not faithful or loyal; treacherous; perfidious; deceitful. The king's subjects may prove false to him. So we say, a false heart.
  10. Unfaithful; inconstant; as a false friend; a false lover; false to promises and vows. The husband and wife proved false to each other.
  11. Deceitful; treacherous; betraying secrets.
  12. Counterfeit; not genuine or real; as, a false diamond.
  13. Hypocritical; feigned; made or assumed for the purpose of deception; as, false tears; false modesty. The man appears in false colors. The advocate gave the subject a false coloring. False fire, a blue flame, made by the burning of certain combustibles, in a wooden tube; used as a signal during the night. Mar. Dict. False imprisonment, the arrest and imprisonment of a person without warrant or cause, or contrary to law; or the unlawful detaining of a person in custody.

FALSE, adv.

Not truly; not honestly; falsely. Shak.


FALSE, v.t.

  1. To violate by failure of veracity; to deceive. [Obs.] Spenser.
  2. To defeat; to balk; to evade. [Obs.] Spenser

False
  1. Uttering falsehood; unveracious; given to deceit; dishnest; as, a false witness.
  2. Not truly; not honestly; falsely.

    "You play me false." Shak.
  3. To report falsely; to falsify.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  4. Not faithful or loyal, as to obligations, allegiance, vows, etc.; untrue; treacherous; perfidious; as, a false friend, lover, or subject; false to promises.

    I to myself was false, ere thou to me. Milton.

  5. To betray; to falsify.

    [Obs.]

    [He] hath his truthe falsed in this wise. Chaucer.

  6. Not according with truth or reality; not true; fitted or likely to deceive or disappoint; as, a false statement.
  7. To mislead by want of truth; to deceive.

    [Obs.]

    In his falsed fancy. Spenser.

  8. Not genuine or real; assumed or designed to deceive; counterfeit; hypocritical; as, false tears; false modesty; false colors; false jewelry.

    False face must hide what the false heart doth know. Shak.

  9. To feign; to pretend to make.

    [Obs.] "And falsed oft his blows." Spenser.
  10. Not well founded; not firm or trustworthy; erroneous; as, a false claim; a false conclusion; a false construction in grammar.

    Whose false foundation waves have swept away. Spenser.

  11. Not essential or permanent, as parts of a structure which are temporary or supplemental.
  12. Not in tune.

    False arch (Arch.), a member having the appearance of an arch, though not of arch construction. -- False attic, an architectural erection above the main cornice, concealing a roof, but not having windows or inclosing rooms. -- False bearing, any bearing which is not directly upon a vertical support; thus, the weight carried by a corbel has a false bearing. -- False cadence, an imperfect or interrupted cadence. -- False conception (Med.), an abnormal conception in which a mole, or misshapen fleshy mass, is produced instead of a properly organized fetus. -- False croup (Med.), a spasmodic affection of the larynx attended with the symptoms of membranous croup, but unassociated with the deposit of a fibrinous membrane. -- False door or window (Arch.), the representation of a door or window, inserted to complete a series of doors or windows or to give symmetry. -- False fire, a combustible carried by vessels of war, chiefly for signaling, but sometimes burned for the purpose of deceiving an enemy; also, a light on shore for decoying a vessel to destruction. -- False galena. See Blende. -- False imprisonment (Law), the arrest and imprisonment of a person without warrant or cause, or contrary to law; or the unlawful detaining of a person in custody. -- False keel (Naut.), the timber below the main keel, used to serve both as a protection and to increase the shio's lateral resistance. -- False key, a picklock. -- False leg. (Zoöl.) See Proleg. -- False membrane (Med.), the fibrinous deposit formed in croup and diphtheria, and resembling in appearance an animal membrane. -- False papers (Naut.), documents carried by a ship giving false representations respecting her cargo, destination, ect., for the purpose of deceiving. -- False passage (Surg.), an unnatural passage leading off from a natural canal, such as the urethra, and produced usually by the unskillful introduction of instruments. -- False personation (Law), the intentional false assumption of the name and personality of another. -- False pretenses (Law), false representations concerning past or present facts and events, for the purpose of defrauding another. -- False rail (Naut.), a thin piece of timber placed on top of the head rail to strengthen it. -- False relation (Mus.), a progression in harmony, in which a certain note in a chord appears in the next chord prefixed by a flat or sharp. -- False return (Law), an untrue return made to a process by the officer to whom it was delivered for execution. -- False ribs (Anat.), the asternal rebs, of which there are five pairs in man. -- False roof (Arch.), the space between the upper ceiling and the roof. Oxford Gloss. -- False token, a false mark or other symbol, used for fraudulent purposes. -- False scorpion (Zoöl.), any arachnid of the genus Chelifer. See Book scorpion. -- False tack (Naut.), a coming up into the wind and filling away again on the same tack. -- False vampire (Zoöl.), the Vampyrus spectrum of South America, formerly erroneously supposed to have blood-sucking habits; -- called also vampire, and ghost vampire. The genuine blood-sucking bats belong to the genera Desmodus and Diphylla. See Vampire. -- False window. (Arch.) See False door, above. -- False wing. (Zoöl.) See Alula, and Bastard wing, under Bastard. -- False works (Civil Engin.), construction works to facilitate the erection of the main work, as scaffolding, bridge centering, etc.

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False

FALSE, adjective [Latin falsus, from fallo, to deceive. See Fall and Fail.]

1. Not true; not conformable to fact; expressing what is contrary to that which exists, is done, said or thought. A false report communicates what is not done or said. A false accusation imputes to a person what he has not done or said. A false witness testifies what is not true. A false opinion is not according to truth or fact. The word is applicable to any subject, physical or moral.

2. Not well founded; as a false claim.

3. Not true; not according to the lawful standard; as a false weight or measure.

4. Substituted for another; succedaneous; supposititious; as a false bottom.

5. Counterfeit; forged; not genuine; as false coin; a false bill or note.

6. Not solid or sound; deceiving expectations; as a false foundation

FALSE and slippery ground.

7. Not agreeable to rule or propriety; as false construction in language.

8. Not honest or just; not fair; as false play.

9. Not faithful or loyal; treacherous; perfidious; deceitful. The king's subjects may prove false to him. So we say, a false heart.

10. Unfaithful; inconstant; as a false friend; a false lover; false to promises and vows.

The husband and wife proved false to each other.

11. Deceitful; treacherous; betraying secrets.

12. Counterfeit; not genuine or real; as a false diamond.

13. Hypocritical; feigned; made or assumed for the purpose of deception; as false tears; false modesty. The man appears in false colors. The advocate gave the subject a false coloring.

FALSE fire, a blue flame, made by the burning of certain combustibles, in a wooden tube; used as a signal during the night.

FALSE imprisonment, the arrest and imprisonment of a person without warrant or cause, or contrary to law; or the unlawful detaining of a person in custody.

FALSE, adverb Not truly; not honestly; falsely.

FALSE, verb transitive

1. To violate by failure of veracity; to deceive. obsolete

2. To defeat; to balk; to evade. obsolete

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

divided

DIVIDED, pp. Parted; disunited; distributed.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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