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Monday - December 10, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [esteem]

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esteem

ESTEE'M, v.t. [L. estimo; Gr. to honor or esteem.]

1. To set a value on, whether high or low; to estimate; to value.

Then he forsook God who made him, and lightly esteemed the rock of his salvation. Deut.32.

They that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 Sam.2.

2. To prize; to set a high value on; to regard with reverence, respect or friendship. When our minds are not biased, we always esteem the industrious, the generous, the brave, the virtuous, and the learned.

Will he esteem thy riches? Job.36.

3. To hold in opinion; to repute; to think.

One man esteemeth one day above another; another esteemeth every day alike. Rom.14.

4. To compare in value; to estimate by proportion. [Little used.]

ESTEE'M, n. Estimation; opinion or judgment of merit or demerit. This man is of no worth in my esteem.

1. High value or estimation; great regard; favorable opinion, founded on supposed worth.

Both those poets lived in much esteem with good and holy men in orders.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [esteem]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

ESTEE'M, v.t. [L. estimo; Gr. to honor or esteem.]

1. To set a value on, whether high or low; to estimate; to value.

Then he forsook God who made him, and lightly esteemed the rock of his salvation. Deut.32.

They that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 Sam.2.

2. To prize; to set a high value on; to regard with reverence, respect or friendship. When our minds are not biased, we always esteem the industrious, the generous, the brave, the virtuous, and the learned.

Will he esteem thy riches? Job.36.

3. To hold in opinion; to repute; to think.

One man esteemeth one day above another; another esteemeth every day alike. Rom.14.

4. To compare in value; to estimate by proportion. [Little used.]

ESTEE'M, n. Estimation; opinion or judgment of merit or demerit. This man is of no worth in my esteem.

1. High value or estimation; great regard; favorable opinion, founded on supposed worth.

Both those poets lived in much esteem with good and holy men in orders.

E-STEEM, n.

  1. Estimation; opinion or judgment of merit or demerit. This man is of no worth in my esteem.
  2. High value or estimation; great regard; favorable opinion, founded on supposed worth. Both these poets lived in much esteem with good and holy men in orders. Dryden.

E-STEEM', v.i.

To consider as to value. Spenser.


E-STEEM', v.t. [Fr. estimer; It. estimare; Sp. and Port. estimar; Arm. istimout, istimein; L. æstimo; Gr. ειστιμαομαι; εις and τιμαω, to honor or esteem. See Class Dm, No. 28.]

  1. To set a value on, whether high or low; to estimate; to value. Then he forsook God who made him, and lightly esteemed the rock of his salvation. Deut xxxii. They that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 Sam. ii.
  2. To prize; to set a high value on; to regard with reverence, respect or friendship. When our minds are not biased, we always esteem the industrious, the generous, the brave, the virtuous, and the learned. Will he esteem thy riches? Job xxxvi.
  3. To hold in opinion; to repute; to think. One man esteemeth one day above another; another esteemeth every day alike. Rom xiv.
  4. To compare in value; to estimate by proportion. [Little used.] Davies.

Es*teem"
  1. To set a value on; to appreciate the worth of; to estimate; to value; to reckon.

    Then he forsook God, which made him, and lightly esteemed the Rock of his salvation. Deut. xxxii. 15.

    Thou shouldst (gentle reader) esteem his censure and authority to be of the more weighty credence. Bp. Gardiner.

    Famous men, -- whose scientific attainments were esteemed hardly less than supernatural. Hawthorne.

  2. To form an estimate; to have regard to the value; to consider.

    [Obs.]

    We ourselves esteem not of that obedience, or love, or gift, which is of force. Milton.

  3. Estimation; opinion of merit or value; hence, valuation; reckoning; price.

    Most dear in the esteem
    And poor in worth!
    Shak.

    I will deliver you, in ready coin,
    The full and dear'st esteem of what you crave.
    J. Webster.

  4. To set a high value on; to prize; to regard with reverence, respect, or friendship.

    Will he esteem thy riches? Job xxxvi. 19.

    You talk kindlier: we esteem you for it. Tennyson.

    Syn. -- To estimate; appreciate; regard; prize; value; respect; revere. See Appreciate, Estimate.

  5. High estimation or value; great regard; favorable opinion, founded on supposed worth.

    Nor should thy prowess want praise and esteem. Shak.

    Syn. -- See Estimate, n.

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Esteem

ESTEE'M, verb transitive [Latin estimo; Gr. to honor or esteem ]

1. To set a value on, whether high or low; to estimate; to value.

Then he forsook God who made him, and lightly esteemed the rock of his salvation. Deuteronomy 32:15.

They that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 Samuel 2:30.

2. To prize; to set a high value on; to regard with reverence, respect or friendship. When our minds are not biased, we always esteem the industrious, the generous, the brave, the virtuous, and the learned.

Will he esteem thy riches? Job 36:19.

3. To hold in opinion; to repute; to think.

One man esteemeth one day above another; another esteemeth every day alike. Romans 14:5.

4. To compare in value; to estimate by proportion. [Little used.]

ESTEE'M, noun Estimation; opinion or judgment of merit or demerit. This man is of no worth in my esteem

1. High value or estimation; great regard; favorable opinion, founded on supposed worth.

Both those poets lived in much esteem with good and holy men in orders.

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Because our nation's Christian heritage is important. The historical meaning of words is important. Faithfully advancing the cause of Christ, by which much our language was shaped, is my life's purpose.

— Shelby (Brazoria, Tex)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

pledge

PLEDGE, n. [L. plico.]

1. Something put in pawn; that which is deposited with another as security for the repayment of money borrowed, or for the performance of some agreement or obligation; a pawn. A borrows ten pounds of B, and deposits his watch as a pledge that the money shall be repaid; and by repayment of the money, A redeems the pledge.

2. Any thing given or considered as a security for the performance of an act. Thus a man gives a word or makes a promise to another, which is received as a pledge for fulfillment. The mutual affection of husband and wife is a pledge for the faithful performance of the marriage covenant. Mutual interest is the best pledge for the performance of treaties.

3. A surety; a hostage.

4. In law, a gage or security real or personal, given for the repayment of money. It is of two kinds; vadium vivum, a living pledge, as when a man borrows money and grants an estate to be held by the pledgee, till the rents and profits shall refund the money, in which case the land or pledge is said to be living; or it is vadium mortuum, a dead pledge, called a mortgage. [See Mortgage.]

5. In law, bail; surety given for the prosecution of a suit, or for the appearance of a defendant, or for restoring goods taken in distress and replevied. The distress itself is also called a pledge, and the glove formerly thrown down by a champion in trial by battel, was a pledge by which the champion stipulated to encounter his antagonist in that trial.

6. A warrant to secure a person from injury in drinking.

To put in pledge, to pawn.

To hold in pledge, to keep as security.

PLEDGE, v.t.

1. To deposit in pawn; to deposit or leave in possession of a person something which is to secure the repayment of money borrowed, or the performance of some act. [This word is applied chiefly to the depositing of goods or personal property. When real estate is given as security we usually apply the word mortgage.]

2. To give as a warrant or security; as, to pledge one's word or honor; to pledge one's veracity.

3. To secure by a pledge.

I accept her,

And here to pledge my vow I give my hand. [Unusual.]

4. To invite to drink by accepting the cup or health after another. Or to warrant or be surety for a person that he shall receive no harm while drinking, or from the draught; a practice which originated among our ancestors in their rude state, and which was intended to secure the person from being stabbed while drinking, or from being poisoned by the liquor. In the first case, a by-stander pledges the person drinking; in the latter, the person drinking pledges his guest by drinking first, and then handing the cup to his guest. The latter practice is frequent among the common people in America to this day; the owner of the liquor taking the cup says to his friend, I pledge you, and drinks, then hands the cup to his guest; a remarkable instance of the power of habit, as the reason of the custom has long since ceased.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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