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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [equation]

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equation

EQUA'TION, n. [L. oequatio, from oequo, to make equal or level.]

1. Literally, a making equal, or an equal division.

2. In algebra, a proposition asserting the equality of two quantities, and expressed by the sign=between them; or an expression of the same quantity in two dissimilar terms, but of equal value, as 3s=36d, or x=b+m-r. In the latter case, x is equal to be added to m, with r subtracted, and the quantities on the right hand of the sign of equation are said to be the value of x on the left hand.

3. In astronomy, the reduction of the apparent time or motion of the sun to equable, mean or true time.

4. The reduction of any extremes to a mean proportion.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [equation]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

EQUA'TION, n. [L. oequatio, from oequo, to make equal or level.]

1. Literally, a making equal, or an equal division.

2. In algebra, a proposition asserting the equality of two quantities, and expressed by the sign=between them; or an expression of the same quantity in two dissimilar terms, but of equal value, as 3s=36d, or x=b+m-r. In the latter case, x is equal to be added to m, with r subtracted, and the quantities on the right hand of the sign of equation are said to be the value of x on the left hand.

3. In astronomy, the reduction of the apparent time or motion of the sun to equable, mean or true time.

4. The reduction of any extremes to a mean proportion.

E-QUA'TION, n. [L. æquatio, from æquo, to make equal or level.]

  1. Literally, a making equal, or an equal division.
  2. In algebra, a proposition asserting the equality of two quantities, and expressed by the sign = between them; or an expression of the same quantity in two dissimilar terms, but of equal value, as 3s=36d, or x=b+m-r. In the latter case, x is equal to b added to m, with r subtracted, and the quantities on the right hand of the sign of equation are said to be the value of x on the left hand. Encyc. Johnson.
  3. In astronomy, the reduction of the apparent time or motion of the sun to equable, mean, or true time. Encyc.
  4. The reduction of any extremes to a mean proportion. Harris.

E*qua"tion
  1. A making equal; equal division; equality; equilibrium.

    Again the golden day resumed its right,
    And ruled in just equation with the night.
    Rowe.

  2. An expression of the condition of equality between two algebraic quantities or sets of quantities, the sign = being placed between them; as, a binomial equation; a quadratic equation; an algebraic equation; a transcendental equation; an exponential equation; a logarithmic equation; a differential equation, etc.
  3. A quantity to be applied in computing the mean place or other element of a celestial body; that is, any one of the several quantities to be added to, or taken from, its position as calculated on the hypothesis of a mean uniform motion, in order to find its true position as resulting from its actual and unequal motion.

    Absolute equation. See under Absolute. -- Equation box, or Equational box, a system of differential gearing used in spinning machines for regulating the twist of the yarn. It resembles gearing used in equation clocks for showing apparent time. -- Equation of the center (Astron.), the difference between the place of a planet as supposed to move uniformly in a circle, and its place as moving in an ellipse. -- Equations of condition (Math.), equations formed for deducing the true values of certain quantities from others on which they depend, when different sets of the latter, as given by observation, would yield different values of the quantities sought, and the number of equations that may be found is greater than the number of unknown quantities. -- Equation of a curve (Math.), an equation which expresses the relation between the coördinates of every point in the curve. -- Equation of equinoxes (Astron.), the difference between the mean and apparent places of the equinox. -- Equation of payments (Arith.), the process of finding the mean time of payment of several sums due at different times. -- Equation of time (Astron.), the difference between mean and apparent time, or between the time of day indicated by the sun, and that by a perfect clock going uniformly all the year round. -- Equation clock or watch, a timepiece made to exhibit the differences between mean solar and apparent solar time. Knight. -- Normal equation. See under Normal. -- Personal equation (Astron.), the difference between an observed result and the true qualities or peculiarities in the observer; particularly the difference, in an average of a large number of observation, between the instant when an observer notes a phenomenon, as the transit of a star, and the assumed instant of its actual occurrence; or, relatively, the difference between these instants as noted by two observers. It is usually only a fraction of a second; -- sometimes applied loosely to differences of judgment or method occasioned by temperamental qualities of individuals. -- Theory of equations (Math.), the branch of algebra that treats of the properties of a single algebraic equation of any degree containing one unknown quantity.

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Equation

EQUA'TION, noun [Latin oequatio, from oequo, to make equal or level.]

1. Literally, a making equal, or an equal division.

2. In algebra, a proposition asserting the equality of two quantities, and expressed by the sign=between them; or an expression of the same quantity in two dissimilar terms, but of equal value, as 3s=36d, or x=b+m-r. In the latter case, x is equal to be added to m, with r subtracted, and the quantities on the right hand of the sign of equation are said to be the value of x on the left hand.

3. In astronomy, the reduction of the apparent time or motion of the sun to equable, mean or true time.

4. The reduction of any extremes to a mean proportion.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

distinguisher

DISTINGUISHER, n.

1. He or that which distinguishes, or that separates one thing from another by marks of diversity.

2. One who discerns accurately the difference of thins; a nice or judicious observer.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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