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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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element

EL'EMENT, n. [L. elementus.]

1. The first or constituent principle or minutest part or any thing; as the elements of earth, water, salt, or wood; the elements of the world; the elements of animal or vegetable bodies. So letters are called the elements of language.

2. An ingredient; a constituent part of any composition.

3. In a chimical sense, an atom; the minutest particle of a substance; that which cannot be divided by chimical analysis, and therefore considered as a simple substance, as oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, &c.

An element is strictly the last result of chimical analysis; that which cannot be decomposed by any means now employed.

An atom is the last result of mechanical division; that which cannot be any farther divided, without decomposition; hence there may be both elementary and compound atoms.

4. In the plural, the first rules or principles of an art or science; rudiments; as the elements of geometry; the elements of music; the elements of painting; the elements of a theory.

5. In popular language, fire,air, earth and water, are called the four elements, as formerly it was supposed that these are simple bodies,of which the world is composed. Later discoveries prove air, earth and water to be compound bodies,and fire to be only the extrication of light and heat during combustion.

6. Element, in the singular, is sometimes used for the air.

7. The substance which forms the natural or most suitable habitation of an animal. Water is the proper element of fishes; air, of man. Hence,

8. The proper state or sphere of any thing; the state of things suited to one's temper or habits. Faction is the element of a demagogue.

9. The matter or substances which compose the world.

The elements shall melt with fervent heat. 2 Pet.3.

10. The outline or sketch; as the elements of a plan.

11. Moving cause or principle; that which excites action.

Passions, the elements of life.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [element]

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EL'EMENT, n. [L. elementus.]

1. The first or constituent principle or minutest part or any thing; as the elements of earth, water, salt, or wood; the elements of the world; the elements of animal or vegetable bodies. So letters are called the elements of language.

2. An ingredient; a constituent part of any composition.

3. In a chimical sense, an atom; the minutest particle of a substance; that which cannot be divided by chimical analysis, and therefore considered as a simple substance, as oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, &c.

An element is strictly the last result of chimical analysis; that which cannot be decomposed by any means now employed.

An atom is the last result of mechanical division; that which cannot be any farther divided, without decomposition; hence there may be both elementary and compound atoms.

4. In the plural, the first rules or principles of an art or science; rudiments; as the elements of geometry; the elements of music; the elements of painting; the elements of a theory.

5. In popular language, fire,air, earth and water, are called the four elements, as formerly it was supposed that these are simple bodies,of which the world is composed. Later discoveries prove air, earth and water to be compound bodies,and fire to be only the extrication of light and heat during combustion.

6. Element, in the singular, is sometimes used for the air.

7. The substance which forms the natural or most suitable habitation of an animal. Water is the proper element of fishes; air, of man. Hence,

8. The proper state or sphere of any thing; the state of things suited to one's temper or habits. Faction is the element of a demagogue.

9. The matter or substances which compose the world.

The elements shall melt with fervent heat. 2 Pet.3.

10. The outline or sketch; as the elements of a plan.

11. Moving cause or principle; that which excites action.

Passions, the elements of life.

EL'E-MENT, n. [L. elementum; Fr. element; It. and Sp. elemento; Arm. elfenn; W. elven, or elvyz. This word Owen refers to elv or el, a moving principle, that which has in itself the power of motion; and el is also a spirit or angel, which seems to be the Sax. ├Žlf, an elf. Vossius assigns elementum, to eleo, for oleo, to grow. See Elf.]

  1. The first or constituent principle or minutest part of any thing; as, the elements of earth, water, salt or wood; the elements of the world; the elements of animal or vegetable bodies. So letters are called the elements of language.
  2. An ingredient; a constituent part of any composition.
  3. In a chimical sense, an atom; the minutest particle of a substance; that which can not be divided by chimical analysis, and therefore considered as a simple substance, as oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, &c. An element is strictly the last result of chimical analysis; that which can not be decomposed by any means now employed. An atom is the last result of mechanical division; that which can not be any farther divided without decomposition; hence there may be both elementary and compound atoms.
  4. In the plural, the first rules or principles of an art or science; rudiments; as, the elements of geometry; the elements of music; the elements of painting; the elements of a theory.
  5. In popular language, fire, air, earth and water, are called the four elements, as formerly it was supposed that these are simple bodies, of which the world is composed. Later discoveries prove air, earth and water to be compound bodies, and fire to be only the extrication of light and heat during combustion.
  6. Element, in the singular, is sometimes used for the air. Shak.
  7. The substance which forms the natural or most suitable habitation of an animal. Water is the proper element of fishes; air, of man. Hence,
  8. The proper state or sphere of any thing; the state of things suited to one's temper or habits. Faction is the element of a demagogue.
  9. The matter or substances which compose the world. The elements shall melt with fervent heat. 2 Pet. iii.
  10. The outline or sketch; as, the elements of a plan.
  11. Moving cause or principle; that which excites action. Passions, the elements of life. Pope. Elements, in the plural, the bread and wine used in the eucharist.

EL'E-MENT, v.t.

  1. To compound of elements or first principles. Boyle.
  2. To constitute; to make as a first principle. Donne. [This word is rarely or never used.]

El"e*ment
  1. One of the simplest or essential parts or principles of which anything consists, or upon which the constitution or fundamental powers of anything are based.
  2. To compound of elements or first principles.

    [Obs.] "[Love] being elemented too." Donne.
  3. One of the ultimate, undecomposable constituents of any kind of matter. Specifically: (Chem.) A substance which cannot be decomposed into different kinds of matter by any means at present employed; as, the elements of water are oxygen and hydrogen.

    * The elements are naturally classified in several families or groups, as the group of the alkaline elements, the halogen group, and the like. They are roughly divided into two great classes, the metals, as sodium, calcium, etc., which form basic compounds, and the nonmetals or metalloids, as oxygen, sulphur, chlorine, which form acid compounds; but the distinction is only relative, and some, as arsenic, tin, aluminium, etc., form both acid and basic compounds. The essential fact regarding every element is its relative atomic weight or equivalent. When the elements are tabulated in the order of their ascending atomic weights, the arrangement constitutes the series of the Periodic law of Mendelejeff. See Periodic law, under Periodic. This Periodic law enables us to predict the qualities of unknown elements. The number of elements known is about seventy-five, but the gaps in the Periodic law indicate the possibility of many more. Many of the elements with which we are familiar, as hydrogen, carbon, iron, gold, etc., have been recognized, by means of spectrum analysis, in the sun and the fixed stars. From certain evidence (as that afforded by the Periodic law, spectrum analysis, etc.) it appears that the chemical elements probably may not be simple bodies, but only very stable compounds of some simpler body or bodies. In formulas, the elements are designated by abbreviations of their names in Latin or New Latin.

    The Elements
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Name ]Sym-]Atomic Weight]
    ]bol ] O=16 ] H=1 ]
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Aluminum ] Al ] 27.1 ] 26.9]
    Antimony(Stibium)
    Argon
    Arsenic
    Barium
    Beryllium (see Glucinum)
    Bismuth
    Boron
    Bromine
    Cadmium
    Caesium
    Calcium
    Carbon
    Cerium
    Chlorine
    Chromium
    Cobalt
    Columbium
    Copper (Cuprum)
    Erbium
    Fluorine
    Gadolinium
    Gallium
    Germanium
    Glucinum
    Gold
    Helium
    Hydrogen
    Indium
    Iodine
    Iridium
    Iron (Ferrum)
    Krypton
    Lanthanum
    Lead (Plumbum)
    Lithium
    Magnesium
    Manganese
    Mercury (Hydrargyrum)
    Molybdenum
    Neodymium
    Neon
    Nickel
    Niobium (see Columbium)
    Nirogen
    Osmium
    Oxygen
    Palladium
    Phosphorus
    Platinum
    Potassium (Kalium)
    Praseodymium
    Rhodium
    Rubidium
    Ruthenium

    -----------------------------------------------------------
    The Elements -- continued
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Name
    Samarium
    Scandium
    Selenium
    Silicon
    Silver (Argentum)
    Sodium (Natrium)
    Strontium
    Sulphur
    Tantalum
    Tellurium
    Thallium
    Thorium
    Thulium
    Tin (Stannum)
    Titanium
    Tungsten (Wolframium)
    Uranium
    Vanadium
    Wolfranium (see Tungsten)
    Xenon
    Ytterbium
    Yttrium
    Zinc
    Zirconium
    ------------------------------------------------------------

    Several other elements have been announced, as holmium, vesbium, austrium, etc., but their properties, and in some cases their existence, have not yet been definitely established.

  4. To constitute; to make up with elements.

    His very soul was elemented of nothing but sadness. Walton.

  5. One of the ultimate parts which are variously combined in anything; as, letters are the elements of written language; hence, also, a simple portion of that which is complex, as a shaft, lever, wheel, or any simple part in a machine; one of the essential ingredients of any mixture; a constituent part; as, quartz, feldspar, and mica are the elements of granite.

    The simplicity which is so large an element in a noble nature was laughed to scorn. Jowett (Thucyd.).

  6. One out of several parts combined in a system of aggregation, when each is of the nature of the whole; as, a single cell is an element of the honeycomb.

    (b) (Anat.)
  7. One of the simplest essential parts, more commonly called cells, of which animal and vegetable organisms, or their tissues and organs, are composed.
  8. An infinitesimal part of anything of the same nature as the entire magnitude considered; as, in a solid an element may be the infinitesimal portion between any two planes that are separated an indefinitely small distance. In the calculus, element is sometimes used as synonymous with differential.

    (b)
  9. One of the necessary data or values upon which a system of calculations depends, or general conclusions are based; as, the elements of a planet's orbit.
  10. The simplest or fundamental principles of any system in philosophy, science, or art; rudiments; as, the elements of geometry, or of music.
  11. Any outline or sketch, regarded as containing the fundamental ideas or features of the thing in question; as, the elements of a plan.
  12. One of the simple substances, as supposed by the ancient philosophers; one of the imaginary principles of matter.

    (a)
  13. The whole material composing the world.

    The elements shall melt with fervent heat. 2 Peter iii. 10.

  14. The bread and wine used in the eucharist or Lord's supper.

    Magnetic element, one of the hypothetical elementary portions of which a magnet is regarded as made up.

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Element

EL'EMENT, noun [Latin elementus.]

1. The first or constituent principle or minutest part or any thing; as the elements of earth, water, salt, or wood; the elements of the world; the elements of animal or vegetable bodies. So letters are called the elements of language.

2. An ingredient; a constituent part of any composition.

3. In a chimical sense, an atom; the minutest particle of a substance; that which cannot be divided by chimical analysis, and therefore considered as a simple substance, as oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, etc.

An element is strictly the last result of chimical analysis; that which cannot be decomposed by any means now employed.

An atom is the last result of mechanical division; that which cannot be any farther divided, without decomposition; hence there may be both elementary and compound atoms.

4. In the plural, the first rules or principles of an art or science; rudiments; as the elements of geometry; the elements of music; the elements of painting; the elements of a theory.

5. In popular language, fire, air, earth and water, are called the four elements, as formerly it was supposed that these are simple bodies, of which the world is composed. Later discoveries prove air, earth and water to be compound bodies, and fire to be only the extrication of light and heat during combustion.

6. element in the singular, is sometimes used for the air.

7. The substance which forms the natural or most suitable habitation of an animal. Water is the proper element of fishes; air, of man. Hence,

8. The proper state or sphere of any thing; the state of things suited to one's temper or habits. Faction is the element of a demagogue.

9. The matter or substances which compose the world.

The elements shall melt with fervent heat. 2 Peter 3:10.

10. The outline or sketch; as the elements of a plan.

11. Moving cause or principle; that which excites action.

Passions, the elements of life.

EL'EMENT, verb transitive To compound of elements or first principles.

1. To constitute; to make as a first principle.

[This word is rarely or never used.]

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Because the words are defined in their true sense and there are many Scriptures.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

blending

BLEND'ING, ppr. Mingling together; confounding by mixture.

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