HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Thursday - December 13, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [earth]

1
1
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

earth

EARTH, n. erth.

1. Earth, in its primary sense, signifies the particles which compose the mass of the globe, but more particularly the particles which form the fine mold on the surface of the globe; or it denotes any indefinite mass or portion of that matter. We throw up earth with a spade or plow; we fill a pit or ditch with earth; we form a rampart with earth. This substance being considered, by ancient philosophers, as simple, was called an element; and in popular language, we still hear of the four elements, fire, air,earth, and water.

2. In chimistry, the term earth was, till lately, employed to denote a simple elementary body or substance, tasteless, inodorous, uninflammable and infusible. But it has also been applied to substances which have a very sensible alkaline taste, as lime. The primitive earths are reckoned ten in number, viz, silex, alumin, lime, magnesia, baryte, strontian, zircon, glucin, yttria and thorina. Recent experiments prove that most or all of them are compounds of oxygen with bases, some of which appear to possess the properties of metals. In this case the earths are to be considered as metallic oxyds.

3. The terraqueous globe which we inhabit. The earth is nearly spherical, but a little flatted at the poles, and hence its figure is called an oblate spheroid. It is one of the primary planets, revolving round the sun in an orbit which is between those of Venus and Mars. It is nearly eight thousand miles in diameter, and twenty five thousand miles in circumference. Its distance from the sun is about ninety five millions of miles,and its annual revolution constitutes the year of 365 days, 5 hours, and nearly 49 minutes.

4. The world, as opposed to other scenes of existence.

5. The inhabitants of the globe.

The whole earth was of one language. Gen.11.

6. Dry land, opposed to the sea.

God called the dry land earth. Gen.1.

7. Country; region; a distinct part of the globe.

In this sense, land or soil is more generally used.

In scripture, earth is used for a part of the world. Ezra. 1.2.

8. The ground; the surface of the earth. He fell to the earth. The ark was lifted above the earth.

In the second month--was the earth dried. Gen.8.

9. In scripture, things on the earth, are carnal, sensual, temporary things; opposed to heavenly, spiritual or divine things.

10. Figuratively, a low condition. Rev.12.

11. [from ear, L. aro, to plow.] The act of turning up the ground in tillage. [Not used.]

EARTH, v.t. To hide in the earth.

The fox is earthed.

1. To cover with earth or mold.

EARTH, v.i. To retire under ground; to burrow. Here foxes earthed.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [earth]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

EARTH, n. erth.

1. Earth, in its primary sense, signifies the particles which compose the mass of the globe, but more particularly the particles which form the fine mold on the surface of the globe; or it denotes any indefinite mass or portion of that matter. We throw up earth with a spade or plow; we fill a pit or ditch with earth; we form a rampart with earth. This substance being considered, by ancient philosophers, as simple, was called an element; and in popular language, we still hear of the four elements, fire, air,earth, and water.

2. In chimistry, the term earth was, till lately, employed to denote a simple elementary body or substance, tasteless, inodorous, uninflammable and infusible. But it has also been applied to substances which have a very sensible alkaline taste, as lime. The primitive earths are reckoned ten in number, viz, silex, alumin, lime, magnesia, baryte, strontian, zircon, glucin, yttria and thorina. Recent experiments prove that most or all of them are compounds of oxygen with bases, some of which appear to possess the properties of metals. In this case the earths are to be considered as metallic oxyds.

3. The terraqueous globe which we inhabit. The earth is nearly spherical, but a little flatted at the poles, and hence its figure is called an oblate spheroid. It is one of the primary planets, revolving round the sun in an orbit which is between those of Venus and Mars. It is nearly eight thousand miles in diameter, and twenty five thousand miles in circumference. Its distance from the sun is about ninety five millions of miles,and its annual revolution constitutes the year of 365 days, 5 hours, and nearly 49 minutes.

4. The world, as opposed to other scenes of existence.

5. The inhabitants of the globe.

The whole earth was of one language. Gen.11.

6. Dry land, opposed to the sea.

God called the dry land earth. Gen.1.

7. Country; region; a distinct part of the globe.

In this sense, land or soil is more generally used.

In scripture, earth is used for a part of the world. Ezra. 1.2.

8. The ground; the surface of the earth. He fell to the earth. The ark was lifted above the earth.

In the second month--was the earth dried. Gen.8.

9. In scripture, things on the earth, are carnal, sensual, temporary things; opposed to heavenly, spiritual or divine things.

10. Figuratively, a low condition. Rev.12.

11. [from ear, L. aro, to plow.] The act of turning up the ground in tillage. [Not used.]

EARTH, v.t. To hide in the earth.

The fox is earthed.

1. To cover with earth or mold.

EARTH, v.i. To retire under ground; to burrow. Here foxes earthed.


EARTH, n. [erth; Sax. eard, eorth, yrth; D. aarde; G. erde; Sw. iord, jord; Dan. iord; Scot. erd, yerd, yerth; Turk. jerda; Tartaric, yirda. It coincides with the Heb. ארץ. The Ar. أَرَضَ aratza, from which the Arabic and Hebrew words corresponding to the Teutonic above, are derived, signifies to eat, gnaw or corrode as a worm, or the teredo. It is obvious then that the primary sense of earth is fine particles, like mold. The verb may be from רצץ, to break or bruise. The Ch. and Syr. ארעא, earth, may be contracted from the same word. See Corrode.]

  1. Earth, in its primary sense, signifies the particles which compose the mass of the globe, but more particularly the particles which form the fine mold on the surface of the globe; or it denotes any indefinite mass or portion of that matter. We throw up earth with a spade or plow; we fill a pit or ditch with earth; we form a rampart with earth. This substance being considered, by ancient philosophers, as simple, was called an element; and in popular language, we still hear of the four elements, fire, air, earth, and water.
  2. In chimistry, the term earth was, till lately, employed to denote a supposed simple elementary body or substance, defined to be tasteless, inodorous, uninflammable and infusible. But it has also been applied to substances which have a very sensible alkaline taste, as lime. The primitive earths were reckoned ten in number, viz. silex, alumin, lime, magnesia, baryte, strontian, zircon, glucin, yttria and thorina. Recent experiments prove that all of them are compounds of oxygen with metallic bases. The earths are now to be considered as metallic oxyds. Davy. Silliman. Phillips.
  3. The terraqueous globe which we inhabit. The earth is nearly spherical, but a little flatted at the poles, and hence its figure is called an oblate spheroid. It is one of the primary planets, revolving round the sun in an orbit which is between those of Venus and Mars. It is nearly eight thousand miles in diameter, and twenty-five thousand miles in circumference. Its distance from the sun is about ninety-five millions of miles, and its annual revolution constitutes the year of 365 days, 5 hours, and nearly 49 minutes.
  4. The world, as opposed to other scenes of existence. Shak.
  5. The inhabitants of the globe. The whole earth was of one language. Gen. xi.
  6. Dry land, opposed to the sea. God called the dry land earth. Gen. i.
  7. Country; region; a distinct part of the globe. Dryden. In this sense, land or soil is more generally used. In Scripture, earth is used for a part of the world. Ezra i, 2.
  8. The ground; the surface of the earth. He fell to the earth. The ark was lifted above the earth. In the second month – was the earth dried. Gen. viii.
  9. In Scripture, things on the earth, are carnal, sensual, temporary things; opposed to heavenly, spiritual or divine things.
  10. Figuratively, a low condition. Rev. xii.
  11. [From ear, Sax. erian, L. aro, to plow.] The act of turning up the ground in tillage. [Not used.] Tusser.

EARTH, v.i.

To retire under ground; to burrow. Here foxes earthed.


EARTH, v.t.

  1. To hide in the earth. The fox is earthed. Dryden.
  2. To cover with earth or mold.

Earth
  1. The globe or planet which we inhabit; the world, in distinction from the sun, moon, or stars. Also, this world as the dwelling place of mortals, in distinction from the dwelling place of spirits.

    That law preserves the earth a sphere
    And guides the planets in their course.
    S. Rogers.

    In heaven, or earth, or under earth, in hell. Milton.

  2. To hide, or cause to hide, in the earth] to chase into a burrow or den.

    "The fox is earthed." Dryden.
  3. To burrow.

    Tickell.
  4. A plowing.

    [Obs.]

    Such land as ye break up for barley to sow,
    Two earths at the least, ere ye sow it, bestow.
    Tusser.

  5. The connection of any part an electric conductor with the ground; specif., the connection of a telegraph line with the ground through a fault or otherwise.

    * When the resistance of the earth connection is low it is termed a good earth.

  6. The solid materials which make up the globe, in distinction from the air or water; the dry land.

    God called the dry land earth. Gen. i. 10.

    He is pure air and fire, and the dull elements of earth and water never appear in him. Shak.

  7. To cover with earth or mold; to inter; to bury; -- sometimes with up.

    The miser earths his treasure, and the thief,
    Watching the mole, half beggars him ere noon.
    Young.

    Why this in earthing up a carcass? R. Blair.

  8. The softer inorganic matter composing part of the surface of the globe, in distinction from the firm rock; soil of all kinds, including gravel, clay, loam, and the like; sometimes, soil favorable to the growth of plants; the visible surface of the globe; the ground; as, loose earth; rich earth.

    Give him a little earth for charity. Shak.

  9. A part of this globe; a region; a country; land.

    Would I had never trod this English earth. Shak.

  10. Worldly things, as opposed to spiritual things; the pursuits, interests, and allurements of this life.

    Our weary souls by earth beguiled. Keble.

  11. The people on the globe.

    The whole earth was of one language. Gen. xi. 1.

  12. Any earthy-looking metallic oxide, as alumina, glucina, zirconia, yttria, and thoria.

    (b)
  13. A hole in the ground, where an animal hides himself; as, the earth of a fox.

    Macaulay.

    They [ferrets] course the poor conies out of their earths. Holland.

    * Earth is used either adjectively or in combination to form compound words; as, earth apple or earth-apple; earth metal or earth-metal; earth closet or earth-closet.

    Adamic earth, Bitter earth, Bog earth, Chian earth, etc. See under Adamic, Bitter, etc. -- Alkaline earths. See under Alkaline. -- Earth apple. (Bot.) (a) A potato. (b) A cucumber. -- Earth auger, a form of auger for boring into the ground; -- called also earth borer. -- Earth bath, a bath taken by immersing the naked body in earth for healing purposes. -- Earth battery (Physics), a voltaic battery the elements of which are buried in the earth to be acted on by its moisture. -- Earth chestnut, the pignut. -- Earth closet, a privy or commode provided with dry earth or a similar substance for covering and deodorizing the fæcal discharges. -- Earth dog (Zoöl.), a dog that will dig in the earth, or enter holes of foxes, etc. -- Earth hog, Earth pig (Zoöl.), the aard- vark. -- Earth hunger, an intense desire to own land, or, in the case of nations, to extend their domain. -- Earth light (Astron.), the light reflected by the earth, as upon the moon, and corresponding to moonlight; -- called also earth shine. Sir J. Herschel. -- Earth metal. See 1st Earth, 7. (Chem.) -- Earth oil, petroleum. -- Earth pillars or pyramids (Geol.), high pillars or pyramids of earth, sometimes capped with a single stone, found in Switzerland. Lyell. -- Earth pitch (Min.), mineral tar, a kind of asphaltum. -- Earth quadrant, a fourth of the earth's circumference. -- Earth table (Arch.), the lowest course of stones visible in a building; the ground table. -- On earth, an intensive expression, oftenest used in questions and exclamations; as, What on earth shall I do? Nothing on earth will satisfy him. [Colloq.]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

73

573

64

620

87

609
Earth

EARTH, noun erth.

1. earth in its primary sense, signifies the particles which compose the mass of the globe, but more particularly the particles which form the fine mold on the surface of the globe; or it denotes any indefinite mass or portion of that matter. We throw up earth with a spade or plow; we fill a pit or ditch with earth; we form a rampart with earth This substance being considered, by ancient philosophers, as simple, was called an element; and in popular language, we still hear of the four elements, fire, air, earth, and water.

2. In chimistry, the term earth was, till lately, employed to denote a simple elementary body or substance, tasteless, inodorous, uninflammable and infusible. But it has also been applied to substances which have a very sensible alkaline taste, as lime. The primitive earths are reckoned ten in number, viz, silex, alumin, lime, magnesia, baryte, strontian, zircon, glucin, yttria and thorina. Recent experiments prove that most or all of them are compounds of oxygen with bases, some of which appear to possess the properties of metals. In this case the earths are to be considered as metallic oxyds.

3. The terraqueous globe which we inhabit. The earth is nearly spherical, but a little flatted at the poles, and hence its figure is called an oblate spheroid. It is one of the primary planets, revolving round the sun in an orbit which is between those of Venus and Mars. It is nearly eight thousand miles in diameter, and twenty five thousand miles in circumference. Its distance from the sun is about ninety five millions of miles, and its annual revolution constitutes the year of 365 days, 5 hours, and nearly 49 minutes.

4. The world, as opposed to other scenes of existence.

5. The inhabitants of the globe.

The whole earth was of one language. Genesis 11:1.

6. Dry land, opposed to the sea.

God called the dry land earth Genesis 1:1.

7. Country; region; a distinct part of the globe.

In this sense, land or soil is more generally used.

In scripture, earth is used for a part of the world. Ezra 1:2.

8. The ground; the surface of the earth He fell to the earth The ark was lifted above the earth

In the second month--was the earth dried. Gen 8.

9. In scripture, things on the earth are carnal, sensual, temporary things; opposed to heavenly, spiritual or divine things.

10. Figuratively, a low condition. Revelation 12:4.

11. [from ear, Latin aro, to plow.] The act of turning up the ground in tillage. [Not used.]

EARTH, verb transitive To hide in the earth

The fox is earthed.

1. To cover with earth or mold.

EARTH, verb intransitive To retire under ground; to burrow. Here foxes earthed.

Why 1828?

0
2
 


Webster Dictionary helps me explain the words to the children i teach and clarify the meaning of the biblical words.

— Jerome T. Davis (Port Arthur, TX)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

bean-fed

BE'AN-FED, a. Fed with beans.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

155

305

Compact Edition

124

105

CD-ROM

102

81

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.352 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top