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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [drink]

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drink

DRINK, v.i. pret. and pp. drank. Old pret. And pp. drunk; pp. Drunken. [G. Drink and drench are radically the same word, and probably drown. We observe that n is not radical.]

1. To swallow liquor, for quenching thirst or other purpose; as, to drink of the brook.

Ye shall indeed drink of my cup. Matthew 20.

2. To take spirituous liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the use of spirituous liquors; to be a habitual drunkard.

3. To feast; to be entertained with liquors.

To drink to,

1. To salute in drinking; to invite to drink by drinking first; as, I drink to you grace.

2. To wish well to, in the act of taking the cup.

DRINK, v.t.

1. To swallow, as liquids; to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; as, to drink water or wine.

2. To suck in; to absorb; to imbibe.

And let the purple violets drink the stream.

3. To take in by any inlet; to hear; to see; as, to drink words or the voice.

I drink delicious poison from thy eye.

4. To take in air; to inhale.

To drink down, is to act on by drinking; to reduce or subdue; as, to drink down unkindness.

To drink off, to drink the whole at a draught; as, to drink off a cup of cordial.

To drink in, to absorb; to take or receive into any inlet.

To drink up, to drink the whole.

To drink health, or to the health, a customary civility in which a person at taking a glass or cup, expresses his respect or kind wishes for another.

DRINK, n. Liquor to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach, for quenching thirst, or for medicinal purposes; as water, wine, beer, cider, decoctions, &c.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [drink]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DRINK, v.i. pret. and pp. drank. Old pret. And pp. drunk; pp. Drunken. [G. Drink and drench are radically the same word, and probably drown. We observe that n is not radical.]

1. To swallow liquor, for quenching thirst or other purpose; as, to drink of the brook.

Ye shall indeed drink of my cup. Matthew 20.

2. To take spirituous liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the use of spirituous liquors; to be a habitual drunkard.

3. To feast; to be entertained with liquors.

To drink to,

1. To salute in drinking; to invite to drink by drinking first; as, I drink to you grace.

2. To wish well to, in the act of taking the cup.

DRINK, v.t.

1. To swallow, as liquids; to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; as, to drink water or wine.

2. To suck in; to absorb; to imbibe.

And let the purple violets drink the stream.

3. To take in by any inlet; to hear; to see; as, to drink words or the voice.

I drink delicious poison from thy eye.

4. To take in air; to inhale.

To drink down, is to act on by drinking; to reduce or subdue; as, to drink down unkindness.

To drink off, to drink the whole at a draught; as, to drink off a cup of cordial.

To drink in, to absorb; to take or receive into any inlet.

To drink up, to drink the whole.

To drink health, or to the health, a customary civility in which a person at taking a glass or cup, expresses his respect or kind wishes for another.

DRINK, n. Liquor to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach, for quenching thirst, or for medicinal purposes; as water, wine, beer, cider, decoctions, &c.


DRINK, v.t.

  1. To swallow, as liquids; to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; as, to drink water or wine.
  2. To suck in; to absorb; to imbibe. And let the purple violets drink the stream. – Dryden.
  3. To take in by any inlet; to hear; to see; as, to drink words or the voice. – Shak. Pope. I drink delicious poison from thy eye. – Pope.
  4. To take in air; to inhale. To drink down, is to act on by drinking; to reduce or subdue; as, to drink down unkindness. – Shak. To drink off, to drink the whole at a draught; as, to drink off a cup of cordial. To drink in, to absorb; to take or receive into any inlet. To drink up, to drink the whole. To drink health, or to the health, a customary civility in which a person at taking a glass or cup, expresses his respect or kind wishes for another.

DRINK, n.

Liquor to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach, for quenching thirst, or for medicinal purposes; as water, wine, beer, cider, decoctions, &c.


DRINK, v.i. [pret. and pp. drank. Old pret. and pp. drunk; pp. drunken; Sax. drincan, drican, drycian; Goth. dragyan, to give drink; D. drinken; G. trinken; Sw. dricka; Dan. drikker, to drink; Sp. tragar, Port. id., to swallow; trago, a draught. The latter, and probably drink, is from drawing, or the latter may be more nearly allied to W. trochi, or troçi, to plunge, bathe, immerse. Drink and drench are radically the same word, and probably drown. We observe that n is not radical.]

  1. To swallow liquor, for quenching thirst or other purpose; as, to drink of the brook. Ye shall indeed drink of my cup. – Matth. xx.
  2. To take spirituous liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the use of spirituous liquors; to be a habitual drunkard. – Pope.
  3. To feast; to be entertained with liquors. – Shak. To drink to, to salute in drinking; to invite to drink by drinking first; as, I drink to your grace. – Shak. #2. To wish well to, in the act of taking the cup. – Shak.

Drink
  1. To swallow anything liquid, for quenching thirst or other purpose; to imbibe; to receive or partake of, as if in satisfaction of thirst; as, to drink from a spring.

    Gird thyself, and serve me, till have eaten and drunken; and afterward thou shalt eat and drink. Luke xvii. 8.

    He shall drink of the wrath the Almighty. Job xxi. 20.

    Drink of the cup that can not cloy. Keble.

  2. To swallow (a liquid); to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; to imbibe; as, to drink milk or water.

    There lies she with the blessed gods in bliss,
    There drinks the nectar with ambrosia mixed.
    Spenser.

    The bowl of punch which was brewed and drunk in Mrs. Betty's room. Thackeray.

  3. Liquid to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach for quenching thirst or for other purposes, as water, coffee, or decoctions.

    Give me some drink, Titinius. Shak.

  4. To quaff exhilarating or intoxicating liquors, in merriment or feasting; to carouse; to revel; hence, to lake alcoholic liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the (?)se of intoxicating or spirituous liquors; to tipple.

    Pope.

    And they drank, and were merry with him. Gem. xliii. 34.

    Bolingbroke always spoke freely when he had drunk freely. Thackeray.

    To drink to, to salute in drinking; to wish well to, in the act of taking the cup; to pledge in drinking.

    I drink to the general joy of the whole table,
    And to our dear friend Banquo.
    Shak.

  5. To take in (a liquid), in any manner; to suck up; to absorb; to imbibe.

    And let the purple violets drink the stream. Dryden.

  6. Specifically, intoxicating liquor; as, when drink is on, wit is out.

    Drink money, or Drink penny, an allowance, or perquisite, given to buy drink; a gratuity. -- Drink offering (Script.), an offering of wine, etc., in the Jewish religious service. -- In drink, drunk. "The poor monster's in drink." Shak. -- Strong drink, intoxicating liquor; esp., liquor containing a large proportion of alcohol. " Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging." Prov. xx. 1.

  7. To take in; to receive within one, through the senses; to inhale; to hear; to see.

    To drink the cooler air, Tennyson.

    My ears have not yet drunk a hundred words
    Of that tongue's utterance.
    Shak.

    Let me . . . drink delicious poison from thy eye. Pope.

  8. To smoke, as tobacco.

    [Obs.]

    And some men now live ninety years and past,
    Who never drank to tobacco first nor last.
    Taylor (1630.)

    To drink down, to act on by drinking; to reduce or subdue; as, to drink down unkindness. Shak. -- To drink in, to take into one's self by drinking, or as by drinking; to receive and appropriate as in satisfaction of thirst. "Song was the form of literature which he [Burns] had drunk in from his cradle." J. C. Shairp. -- To drink off or up, to drink the whole at a draught; as, to drink off a cup of cordial. -- To drink the health of, or To drink to the health of, to drink while expressing good wishes for the health or welfare of.

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Drink

DRINK, verb intransitive preterit tense and participle passive drank. Old preterit tense And participle passive drunk; participle passive Drunken. [G. drink and drench are radically the same word, and probably drown. We observe that n is not radical.]

1. To swallow liquor, for quenching thirst or other purpose; as, to drink of the brook.

Ye shall indeed drink of my cup. Matthew 20:22.

2. To take spirituous liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the use of spirituous liquors; to be a habitual drunkard.

3. To feast; to be entertained with liquors.

To drink to,

1. To salute in drinking; to invite to drink by drinking first; as, I drink to you grace.

2. To wish well to, in the act of taking the cup.

DRINK, verb transitive

1. To swallow, as liquids; to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; as, to drink water or wine.

2. To suck in; to absorb; to imbibe.

And let the purple violets drink the stream.

3. To take in by any inlet; to hear; to see; as, to drink words or the voice.

I drink delicious poison from thy eye.

4. To take in air; to inhale.

To drink down, is to act on by drinking; to reduce or subdue; as, to drink down unkindness.

To drink off, to drink the whole at a draught; as, to drink off a cup of cordial.

To drink in, to absorb; to take or receive into any inlet.

To drink up, to drink the whole.

To drink health, or to the health, a customary civility in which a person at taking a glass or cup, expresses his respect or kind wishes for another.

DRINK, noun Liquor to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach, for quenching thirst, or for medicinal purposes; as water, wine, beer, cider, decoctions, etc.

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"In the beginning was the WORD" — the power of language is important to me (see Genesis 11:6, John 21:25); e.g., the 1828 definition of "steel" is different than the modern meaning since the Bessemer process wasn't invented until the 1850s.

— Monte (Tucson, AZ)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

presage

PRE'SAGE, n. [L. proesagium; proe, before, and sagio, to perceive or foretell.] Something which foreshows a future event; a prognostic; a present fact indicating something to come.

Joy and shout, presage of victory.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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monte

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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