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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [dock]

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dock

DOCK, n. [Gr., L.] A genus of plants, the Rumex, of several species. Its root resembles a carrot.

DOCK, v.t.

1. To cut off, as the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a horse.

2. To cut off a part; to shorten; to deduct from; as, to dock an account.

3. To cut off, destroy or defeat; to bar; as, to dock an entail.

4. To bring, draw or place a ship in a dock.

DOCK, n.

1. The tail of a beast cut short or clipped; the stump of a tail; the solid part of the tail.

2. A case of leather to cover a horses dock.

DOCK, n. A broad deep trench on the side of a harbor, or bank of a river, in which ships are built or repaired. A dry dock has flood-gates to admit the tide, and to prevent the influx, as occasion may require. Wet docks have no flood-gates, but ships may be repaired in them during the recess of the tide. Wet docks are also constructed with gates to deep the water in at ebb tide, so that vessels may lie constantly afloat in them. In America, the spaces between wharves are called docks.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [dock]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DOCK, n. [Gr., L.] A genus of plants, the Rumex, of several species. Its root resembles a carrot.

DOCK, v.t.

1. To cut off, as the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a horse.

2. To cut off a part; to shorten; to deduct from; as, to dock an account.

3. To cut off, destroy or defeat; to bar; as, to dock an entail.

4. To bring, draw or place a ship in a dock.

DOCK, n.

1. The tail of a beast cut short or clipped; the stump of a tail; the solid part of the tail.

2. A case of leather to cover a horses dock.

DOCK, n. A broad deep trench on the side of a harbor, or bank of a river, in which ships are built or repaired. A dry dock has flood-gates to admit the tide, and to prevent the influx, as occasion may require. Wet docks have no flood-gates, but ships may be repaired in them during the recess of the tide. Wet docks are also constructed with gates to deep the water in at ebb tide, so that vessels may lie constantly afloat in them. In America, the spaces between wharves are called docks.


DOCK, n. [Sax docce; L. daucus; Gr. δαυκος; from Ar. Syr. Class Dg, No. 9.]

The popular name of certain species of Rumex.


DOCK, n.1

  1. The tail of a beast cut short or clipped; the stump of a tail; the solid part of the tail.
  2. A case of leather to cover a horse's dock. – Encyc.

DOCK, n.2

  1. A broad deep trench on the side of a harbor, or bank of a river, in which ships are built or repaired. A dry dock has flood-gates to admit the tide, and to prevent the influx, as occasion may require. Wet docks have no flood-gates, but ships may be repaired in them during the recess of the tide. Wet docks are also constructed with gates to keep the water in at ebb tide, so that vessels may be constantly afloat in them. – Mar. Dict. Cyc. In America, the spaces between wharves are called docks.
  2. The place where a criminal stands in court.

DOCK, v.t. [W. tociaw, and twciaw, to clip, to cut off; whence docket and ticket. Class Dg, No. 19, 47.]

  1. To cut off, as the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a horse.
  2. To cut off a part; to shorten; to deduct from; as, to dock an account.
  3. To cut off, destroy or defeat; to bar; as, to dock an entail.
  4. To bring, draw or place a ship in a dock.

Dock
  1. A genus of plants (Rumex), some species of which are well-known weeds which have a long taproot and are difficult of extermination.

    * Yellow dock is Rumex crispus, with smooth curly leaves and yellow root, which that of other species is used medicinally as an astringent and tonic.

  2. The solid part of an animal's tail, as distinguished from the hair; the stump of a tail; the part of a tail left after clipping or cutting.

    Grew.
  3. to cut off, as the end of a thing] to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a horse.

    His top was docked like a priest biforn. Chaucer.

  4. An artificial basin or an inclosure in connection with a harbor or river, -- used for the reception of vessels, and provided with gates for keeping in or shutting out the tide.
  5. To draw, law, or place (a ship) in a dock, for repairing, cleaning the bottom, etc.
  6. A case of leather to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse.
  7. To cut off a part from; to shorten; to deduct from; to subject to a deduction; as, to dock one's wages.
  8. The slip or water way extending between two piers or projecting wharves, for the reception of ships; -- sometimes including the piers themselves; as, to be down on the dock.
  9. To cut off, bar, or destroy; as, to dock an entail.
  10. The place in court where a criminal or accused person stands.

    Balance dock, a kind of floating dock which is kept level by pumping water out of, or letting it into, the compartments of side chambers. -- Dry dock, a dock from which the water may be shut or pumped out, especially, one in the form of a chamber having walls and floor, often of masonry and communicating with deep water, but having appliances for excluding it; -- used in constructing or repairing ships. The name includes structures used for the examination, repairing, or building of vessels, as graving docks, floating docks, hydraulic docks, etc. -- Floating dock, a dock which is made to become buoyant, and, by floating, to lift a vessel out of water. -- Graving dock, a dock for holding a ship for graving or cleaning the bottom, etc. -- Hydraulic dock, a dock in which a vessel is raised clear of the water by hydraulic presses. -- Naval dock, a dock connected with which are naval stores, materials, and all conveniences for the construction and repair of ships. -- Sectional dock, a form of floating dock made in separate sections or caissons. -- Slip dock, a dock having a sloping floor that extends from deep water to above high-water mark, and upon which is a railway on which runs a cradle carrying the ship. -- Wet dock, a dock where the water is shut in, and kept at a given level, to facilitate the loading and unloading of ships; -- also sometimes used as a place of safety; a basin.

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Dock

DOCK, noun [Gr., Latin ] A genus of plants, the Rumex, of several species. Its root resembles a carrot.

DOCK, verb transitive

1. To cut off, as the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a horse.

2. To cut off a part; to shorten; to deduct from; as, to dock an account.

3. To cut off, destroy or defeat; to bar; as, to dock an entail.

4. To bring, draw or place a ship in a dock

DOCK, noun

1. The tail of a beast cut short or clipped; the stump of a tail; the solid part of the tail.

2. A case of leather to cover a horses dock

DOCK, noun A broad deep trench on the side of a harbor, or bank of a river, in which ships are built or repaired. A dry dock has flood-gates to admit the tide, and to prevent the influx, as occasion may require. Wet docks have no flood-gates, but ships may be repaired in them during the recess of the tide. Wet docks are also constructed with gates to deep the water in at ebb tide, so that vessels may lie constantly afloat in them. In America, the spaces between wharves are called docks.

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Founded on Biblical precepts...definitive way English should be exercised.

— Timothy

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

kex

KEX, n. Hemlock; the stem of the teasel; a dry stalk. [See Kecksy.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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