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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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die

DIE, v.i. [See Day.]

1. To be deprived of respiration, of the circulation of blood, and other bodily functions, and rendered incapable of resuscitation, as animals, either by natural decay, by disease, or by violence; to cease to live; to expire; to decease; to perish; and with respect to man, to depart from this world.

All the first born in the land of Egypt shall die. Exodus 11.

The fish that is in the river shall die. Exodus 7.

This word is followed by of or by. Men die of disease; of a fever; of sickness; of a fall; of grief. They die by the sword; by famine; by pestilence; by violence; by sickness; by disease. In some cases, custom has established the use of the one, to the exclusion of the other; but in many cases, either by or of may be used at the pleasure of the writer or speaker. The use of for, he died for thirst, is not elegant nor common.

2. To be punished with death; to lose life for a crime, or for the sake of another.

I will relieve my master, if I die for it. Christ died for the ungodly. Romans 5.

Christ died for our sins. 1 Corinthians 15.

3. To come to an end; to cease; to be lost; to perish or come to nothing; as, let the secret die in your own breast.

4. To sink; to faint.

His heart died withing him, and he became as a stone. 1 Samuel 25.

5. To languish with pleasure or tenderness; followed by away.

To sounds of heavenly harps she dies away.

6. To languish with affection.

The young men acknowledged that they died for Rebecca.

7. To recede as sound, and become less distinct; to become less and less; or to vanish from the sight, or disappear gradually. Sound or color dies away.

8. To lose vegetable life; to wither; to perish; as plants or seeds. Plants die for want of water. Some plants die annually.

9. To become vapid or spiritless, as liquors; mostly used in the participle; as the cider or beer is dead.

10. In theology, to perish everlastingly; to suffer divine wrath and punishment in the future world.

11. To become indifferent to, or to cease to be under the power of; as, to die to sin.

12. To endure great danger and distress.

I die daily. 1 Corinthians 15.

To die away, to decrease gradually; to cease to blow; as, the wind dies away.

DIE, n. plu. dice.

1. A small cube, marked on its faces with numbers from one to six, used in gaming, by being thrown from a box.

He ventured his all on the cast of a die.

2. Any cubic body; a flat tablet.

3. Hazard; chance.

Such is the die of war.

DIE, n. Plu. Dies. A stamp used in coining money, in founderies, &c.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [die]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DIE, v.i. [See Day.]

1. To be deprived of respiration, of the circulation of blood, and other bodily functions, and rendered incapable of resuscitation, as animals, either by natural decay, by disease, or by violence; to cease to live; to expire; to decease; to perish; and with respect to man, to depart from this world.

All the first born in the land of Egypt shall die. Exodus 11.

The fish that is in the river shall die. Exodus 7.

This word is followed by of or by. Men die of disease; of a fever; of sickness; of a fall; of grief. They die by the sword; by famine; by pestilence; by violence; by sickness; by disease. In some cases, custom has established the use of the one, to the exclusion of the other; but in many cases, either by or of may be used at the pleasure of the writer or speaker. The use of for, he died for thirst, is not elegant nor common.

2. To be punished with death; to lose life for a crime, or for the sake of another.

I will relieve my master, if I die for it. Christ died for the ungodly. Romans 5.

Christ died for our sins. 1 Corinthians 15.

3. To come to an end; to cease; to be lost; to perish or come to nothing; as, let the secret die in your own breast.

4. To sink; to faint.

His heart died withing him, and he became as a stone. 1 Samuel 25.

5. To languish with pleasure or tenderness; followed by away.

To sounds of heavenly harps she dies away.

6. To languish with affection.

The young men acknowledged that they died for Rebecca.

7. To recede as sound, and become less distinct; to become less and less; or to vanish from the sight, or disappear gradually. Sound or color dies away.

8. To lose vegetable life; to wither; to perish; as plants or seeds. Plants die for want of water. Some plants die annually.

9. To become vapid or spiritless, as liquors; mostly used in the participle; as the cider or beer is dead.

10. In theology, to perish everlastingly; to suffer divine wrath and punishment in the future world.

11. To become indifferent to, or to cease to be under the power of; as, to die to sin.

12. To endure great danger and distress.

I die daily. 1 Corinthians 15.

To die away, to decrease gradually; to cease to blow; as, the wind dies away.

DIE, n. plu. dice.

1. A small cube, marked on its faces with numbers from one to six, used in gaming, by being thrown from a box.

He ventured his all on the cast of a die.

2. Any cubic body; a flat tablet.

3. Hazard; chance.

Such is the die of war.

DIE, n. Plu. Dies. A stamp used in coining money, in founderies, &c.


DIE, n.1 [plur. Dice. Fr. ; It. dado; Sp. and Port. id.; Arm. diçz; Ir. disle.]

  1. A small cube, marked on its faces with numbers from one to six, used in gaming, by being thrown from a box. He ventured his all on the cast of a die.
  2. Any cubic body; a flat tablet. – Watts.
  3. In architecture, the cubical part of the pedestal, between its base and cornice.
  4. Hazard; chance. Such is the die of war. – Spenser.

DIE, n.2 [plur. Dies.]

A stamp used in coining money, in founderies, &c.


DIE, v.i. [Sw. ; Dan. döer. This appears to be a contracted word, and the radical letter lost is not obvious. The word dye, to tinge, is contracted from Dg. and the Arabic root signifies not only to tinge, but to perish; which circumstances would lead one to infer that they are radically one word, and that the primary sense is to plunge, fall or sink. The Saxon deadian is evidently a derivative of the participle dead. See Dye.]

  1. To be deprived of respiration, of the circulation of blood, and other bodily functions, and rendered incapable of resuscitation, as animals, either by natural decay, by disease, or by violence; to cease to live; to expire; to decease; to perish; and with respect to man, to depart from this world. All the first born in the land of Egypt shall die. – Ex. xi. The fish that is in the river shall die. – Ex. vii. This word is followed by of or by. Men die of disease; of a fever; of sickness; of a fall; of grief. They die by the sword; by famine; by pestilence; by violence, by sickness, by disease. In some cases, custom has established the use of the one, to the exclusion of the other; but in many cases, either by or of may be used at the pleasure of the writer or speaker. The use of for, he died for thirst, is not elegant nor common.
  2. To be punished with death; to lose life for a crime, or for the sake of another. I will relieve my master, if I die for it. Christ died for the ungodly. – Rom. v. Christ died for our sins. – 1 Cor. xv.
  3. To come to an end; to cease; to be lost; to perish or come to nothing; as, let the secret die in your own breast.
  4. To sink; to faint. His heart died within him, and he became as a stone. – 1 Sam. xxv.
  5. To languish with pleasure or tenderness; followed by away. To sounds of heavenly harp she dies away. – Pope.
  6. To languish with affection. The young men acknowledged that they died for Rebecca. – Tatler.
  7. To recede as sound, and become less distinct; to become less and less; or to vanish from the sight, or disappear gradually. Sound or color dies away.
  8. To lose vegetable life; to wither; to perish; as plants or seeds. Plants die for want of water. Some plants die annually.
  9. To become vapid or spiritless, as liquors; mostly used in the participle, as the cider or beer is dead.
  10. In theology, to perish everlastingly; to suffer divine wrath and punishment in the future world.
  11. To become indifferent to, or to cease so be under the power of; as, to die to sin.
  12. To endure great danger and distress. I die daily. – 1 Cor. xv. To die away, to decrease gradually; to cease to blow; as, the wind dies away.

Die
  1. To pass from an animate to a lifeless state; to cease to live; to suffer a total and irreparable loss of action of the vital functions; to become dead; to expire; to perish; -- said of animals and vegetables; often with of, by, with, from, and rarely for, before the cause or occasion of death; as, to die of disease or hardships; to die by fire or the sword; to die with horror at the thought.

    To die by the roadside of grief and hunger. Macaulay.

    She will die from want of care. Tennyson.

  2. A small cube, marked on its faces with spots from one to six, and used in playing games by being shaken in a box and thrown from it. See Dice.
  3. To suffer death; to lose life.

    In due time Christ died for the ungodly. Rom. v. 6.

  4. Any small cubical or square body.

    Words . . . pasted upon little flat tablets or dies. Watts.

  5. To perish in any manner; to cease; to become lost or extinct; to be extinguished.

    Letting the secret die within his own breast. Spectator.

    Great deeds can not die. Tennyson.

  6. That which is, or might be, determined, by a throw of the die; hazard; chance.

    Such is the die of war. Spenser.

  7. To sink; to faint; to pine; to languish, with weakness, discouragement, love, etc.

    His heart died within, and he became as a stone. 1 Sam. xxv. 37.

    The young men acknowledged, in love letters, that they died for Rebecca. Tatler.

  8. That part of a pedestal included between base and cornice; the dado.
  9. To become indifferent; to cease to be subject; as, to die to pleasure or to sin.
  10. A metal or plate (often one of a pair) so cut or shaped as to give a certain desired form to, or impress any desired device on, an object or surface, by pressure or by a blow; used in forging metals, coining, striking up sheet metal, etc.

    (b)
  11. To recede and grow fainter; to become imperceptible; to vanish; -- often with out or away.

    Blemishes may die away and disappear amidst the brightness. Spectator.

  12. To disappear gradually in another surface, as where moldings are lost in a sloped or curved face.
  13. To become vapid, flat, or spiritless, as liquor.

    To die in the last ditch, to fight till death; to die rather than surrender.

    "There is one certain way," replied the Prince [William of Orange] " by which I can be sure never to see my country's ruin, -- I will die in the last ditch." Hume (Hist. of Eng. ).

    -- To die out, to cease gradually; as, the prejudice has died out.

    Syn. -- To expire; decease; perish; depart; vanish.

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Die

DIE, verb intransitive [See Day.]

1. To be deprived of respiration, of the circulation of blood, and other bodily functions, and rendered incapable of resuscitation, as animals, either by natural decay, by disease, or by violence; to cease to live; to expire; to decease; to perish; and with respect to man, to depart from this world.

All the first born in the land of Egypt shall die Exodus 11:5.

The fish that is in the river shall die Exodus 7:18.

This word is followed by of or by. Men die of disease; of a fever; of sickness; of a fall; of grief. They die by the sword; by famine; by pestilence; by violence; by sickness; by disease. In some cases, custom has established the use of the one, to the exclusion of the other; but in many cases, either by or of may be used at the pleasure of the writer or speaker. The use of for, he died for thirst, is not elegant nor common.

2. To be punished with death; to lose life for a crime, or for the sake of another.

I will relieve my master, if I die for it. Christ died for the ungodly. Romans 5:7.

Christ died for our sins. 1 Corinthians 15:22.

3. To come to an end; to cease; to be lost; to perish or come to nothing; as, let the secret die in your own breast.

4. To sink; to faint.

His heart died withing him, and he became as a stone. 1 Samuel 25:1.

5. To languish with pleasure or tenderness; followed by away.

To sounds of heavenly harps she dies away.

6. To languish with affection.

The young men acknowledged that they died for Rebecca.

7. To recede as sound, and become less distinct; to become less and less; or to vanish from the sight, or disappear gradually. Sound or color dies away.

8. To lose vegetable life; to wither; to perish; as plants or seeds. Plants die for want of water. Some plants die annually.

9. To become vapid or spiritless, as liquors; mostly used in the participle; as the cider or beer is dead.

10. In theology, to perish everlastingly; to suffer divine wrath and punishment in the future world.

11. To become indifferent to, or to cease to be under the power of; as, to die to sin.

12. To endure great danger and distress.

I die daily. 1 Corinthians 15:22.

To die away, to decrease gradually; to cease to blow; as, the wind dies away.

DIE, noun plural dice.

1. A small cube, marked on its faces with numbers from one to six, used in gaming, by being thrown from a box.

He ventured his all on the cast of a die

2. Any cubic body; a flat tablet.

3. Hazard; chance.

Such is the die of war.

DIE, noun plural Dies. A stamp used in coining money, in founderies, etc.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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fludder

FLUD'DER, n. An aquatic fowl of the diver kind, nearly as large as a goose.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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