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Saturday - September 22, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [diamond]

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diamond

DIAMOND, n. Dimond. [L., Gr. See Adamant.]

1. A mineral, gem or precious stone, of the most valuable kind, remarkable for its hardness, as it scratches all other minerals. When pure, the diamond is usually clear and transparent, but it is sometimes colored. In its rough state, it is commonly in the form of a roundish pebble, or of octahedral crystals. It consists of carbon, and when heated to 14 degrees Wedgewood, and exposed to a current of air, it is gradually, but completely combustible. When pure and transparent, it is said to be of the first water.

2. A very small printing letter.

3. A figure, otherwise called a rhombus.

DIAMOND, a. Resembling a diamond, as a diamond color; or consisting of diamonds, as a diamond chain.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [diamond]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DIAMOND, n. Dimond. [L., Gr. See Adamant.]

1. A mineral, gem or precious stone, of the most valuable kind, remarkable for its hardness, as it scratches all other minerals. When pure, the diamond is usually clear and transparent, but it is sometimes colored. In its rough state, it is commonly in the form of a roundish pebble, or of octahedral crystals. It consists of carbon, and when heated to 14 degrees Wedgewood, and exposed to a current of air, it is gradually, but completely combustible. When pure and transparent, it is said to be of the first water.

2. A very small printing letter.

3. A figure, otherwise called a rhombus.

DIAMOND, a. Resembling a diamond, as a diamond color; or consisting of diamonds, as a diamond chain.


DI'A-MOND, a.

Resembling a diamond, as a diamond color; or consisting of diamonds, as, a diamond chain.


DI'A-MOND, n. [di'mond; Fr. diamant; It. and Sp. diamante; G. and D. diamant; L. adamas; Gr. αδαμας, αδαμαντος, whence adamant, from the Celtic; W. ehedvaen, moving stone; ehed, to fly or move, and maen, stone; a name first given to the lode-stone. See Adamant.]

  1. A mineral, gem, or precious stone, of the most valuable kind, remarkable for its hardness, as it scratches all other minerals. When pure, the diamond is usually clear and transparent, but it is sometimes colored. In its rough state, it is commonly in the form of a roundish pebble, or of octahedral crystals. It consists of pure carbon, and when heated to 14º Wedgwood, and exposed to a current of air, it is gradually, but completely combustible. When pure and transparent, it is said to be of the first water. – Encyc. Kirwan. Cleaveland.
  2. A very small printing letter.
  3. A figure, otherwise called a rhombus.

Di"a*mond
  1. A precious stone or gem excelling in brilliancy and beautiful play of prismatic colors, and remarkable for extreme hardness.

    * The diamond is native carbon in isometric crystals, often octahedrons with rounded edges. It is usually colorless, but some are yellow, green, blue, and even black. It is the hardest substance known. The diamond as found in nature (called a rough diamond) is cut, for use in jewelry, into various forms with many reflecting faces, or facets, by which its brilliancy is much increased. See Brilliant, Rose. Diamonds are said to be of the first water when very transparent, and of the second or third water as the transparency decreases.

  2. Resembling a diamond; made of, or abounding in, diamonds; as, a diamond chain; a diamond field.
  3. A geometrical figure, consisting of four equal straight lines, and having two of the interior angles acute and two obtuse; a rhombus; a lozenge.
  4. One of a suit of playing cards, stamped with the figure of a diamond.
  5. A pointed projection, like a four-sided pyramid, used for ornament in lines or groups.
  6. The infield; the square space, 90 feet on a side, having the bases at its angles.
  7. The smallest kind of type in English printing, except that called brilliant, which is seldom seen.

    * This line is printed in the type called Diamond.

    Black diamond, coal; (Min.) See Carbonado. -- Bristol diamond. See Bristol stone, under Bristol. -- Diamond beetle (Zoöl.), a large South American weevil (Entimus imperialis), remarkable for its splendid luster and colors, due to minute brilliant scales. -- Diamond bird (Zoöl.), a small Australian bird (Pardalotus punctatus, family Ampelidæ.). It is black, with white spots. -- Diamond drill (Engin.), a rod or tube the end of which is set with black diamonds; -- used for perforating hard substances, esp. for boring in rock. -- Diamond finch (Zoöl.), a small Australian sparrow, often kept in a cage. Its sides are black, with conspicuous white spots, and the rump is bright carmine. -- Diamond groove (Iron Working), a groove of V-section in a roll. -- Diamond mortar (Chem.), a small steel mortar used for pulverizing hard substances. - - Diamond-point tool, a cutting tool whose point is diamond-shaped. -- Diamond snake (Zoöl.), a harmless snake of Australia (Morelia spilotes); the carpet snake. -- Glazier's diamond, a small diamond set in a glazier's tool, for cutting glass.

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Diamond

DIAMOND, noun Dimond. [Latin , Gr. See Adamant.]

1. A mineral, gem or precious stone, of the most valuable kind, remarkable for its hardness, as it scratches all other minerals. When pure, the diamond is usually clear and transparent, but it is sometimes colored. In its rough state, it is commonly in the form of a roundish pebble, or of octahedral crystals. It consists of carbon, and when heated to 14 degrees Wedgewood, and exposed to a current of air, it is gradually, but completely combustible. When pure and transparent, it is said to be of the first water.

2. A very small printing letter.

3. A figure, otherwise called a rhombus.

DIAMOND, adjective Resembling a diamond as a diamond color; or consisting of diamonds, as a diamond chain.

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The 1828 Webster's will help in my study of the Bible and reveal the more original and Biblical meanings of the words.

— Loriann (Surrey, BC)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

mental

MEN'TAL, a. Pertaining to the mind; intellectual; as mental faculties; mental operations; mental sight; mental taste.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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