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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [devil]

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devil

DEVIL, n. Devl. [L., to calumniate.]

1. In the Christian theology, an evil spirit or being; a fallen angel, expelled from heaven for rebellion against God; the chief of the apostate angels; the implacable enemy and tempter of the human race. In the New Testament, the word is frequently and erroneously used for demon.

2. A very wicked person, and in ludicrous language, an great evil. In profane language, it is an expletive expressing wonder, vexation, &c.

3. An idol, or false god. Leviticus 17. 2 Chronicles 11.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [devil]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DEVIL, n. Devl. [L., to calumniate.]

1. In the Christian theology, an evil spirit or being; a fallen angel, expelled from heaven for rebellion against God; the chief of the apostate angels; the implacable enemy and tempter of the human race. In the New Testament, the word is frequently and erroneously used for demon.

2. A very wicked person, and in ludicrous language, an great evil. In profane language, it is an expletive expressing wonder, vexation, &c.

3. An idol, or false god. Leviticus 17. 2 Chronicles 11.

DEV'IL, n. [dev'l; Sax. diafol; D. duivel; G. teufel; Sw. diefvul; Dan. diævel; Russ. diavol; Tartar, diof; L. diabolus; Gr. διαβολος, said to be from διαβαλλω, to calumniate; Fr. diable; Sp. diablo; Port. diabo; It. diavolo. The Armoric is diaul; W. diawl, which Owen supposes to be compounded of di, a negative, and awl, light – one without light, (prince of darkness.) The Irish is diabhail, which, according to O'Brien, is composed of dia, deity, and bhal, air, (god of the air.) If these Celtic words are justly explained, they are not connected with diabolus, or the latter is erroneously deduced.]

  1. In the Christian theology, an evil spirit or being; a fallen angel, expelled from heaven for rebellion against God; the chief of the apostate angels; the implacable enemy and tempter of the human race. In the New Testament, the word is frequently and erroneously used for demon.
  2. A very wicked person, and in ludicrous language, any great evil. In profane language, it is an expletive expressing wonder, vexation, &c.
  3. An idol, or false god. – Lev. xvii. 2 Chron. xi.

Dev"il
  1. The Evil One; Satan, represented as the tempter and spiritual of mankind.

    [Jesus] being forty days tempted of the devil. Luke iv. 2.

    That old serpent, called the Devil, and Satan, which deceiveth the whole world. Rev. xii. 9.

  2. To make like a devil] to invest with the character of a devil.
  3. An evil spirit; a demon.

    A dumb man possessed with a devil. Matt. ix. 32.

  4. To grill with Cayenne pepper; to season highly in cooking, as with pepper.

    A deviled leg of turkey. W. Irving.

  5. A very wicked person; hence, any great evil.

    "That devil Glendower." "The devil drunkenness." Shak.

    Have not I chosen you twelve, and one of you is a devil? John vi. 70.

  6. An expletive of surprise, vexation, or emphasis, or, ironically, of negation.

    [Low]

    The devil a puritan that he is, . . . but a timepleaser. Shak.

    The things, we know, are neither rich nor rare,
    But wonder how the devil they got there.
    Pope.

  7. A dish, as a bone with the meat, broiled and excessively peppered; a grill with Cayenne pepper.

    Men and women busy in baking, broiling, roasting oysters, and preparing devils on the gridiron. Sir W. Scott.

  8. A machine for tearing or cutting rags, cotton, etc.

    Blue devils. See under Blue. -- Cartesian devil. See under Cartesian. -- Devil bird (Zoöl.), one of two or more South African drongo shrikes (Edolius retifer, and E. remifer), believed by the natives to be connected with sorcery. -- Devil may care, reckless, defiant of authority; -- used adjectively. Longfellow. -- Devil's apron (Bot.), the large kelp (Laminaria saccharina, and L. longicruris) of the Atlantic ocean, having a blackish, leathery expansion, shaped somewhat like an apron. -- Devil's coachhorse. (Zoöl.) (a) The black rove beetle (Ocypus olens). [Eng.] (b) A large, predacious, hemipterous insect (Prionotus cristatus); the wheel bug. [U.S.] -- Devil's darning-needle. (Zoöl.) See under Darn, v. t. -- Devil's fingers, Devil's hand (Zoöl.), the common British starfish (Asterias rubens); -- also applied to a sponge with stout branches. [Prov. Eng., Irish *** Scot.] -- Devil's riding-horse (Zoö]l.), the American mantis (Mantis Carolina). -- The Devil's tattoo, a drumming with the fingers or feet. "Jack played the Devil's tattoo on the door with his boot heels." F. Hardman (Blackw. Mag.). -- Devil worship, worship of the power of evil; -- still practiced by barbarians who believe that the good and evil forces of nature are of equal power. -- Printer's devil, the youngest apprentice in a printing office, who runs on errands, does dirty work (as washing the ink rollers and sweeping), etc. "Without fearing the printer's devil or the sheriff's officer." Macaulay. -- Tasmanian devil (Zoöl.), a very savage carnivorous marsupial of Tasmania (Dasyurus, or Diabolus, ursinus). -- To play devil with, to molest extremely; to ruin. [Low]

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Devil

DEVIL, noun Devl. [Latin , to calumniate.]

1. In the Christian theology, an evil spirit or being; a fallen angel, expelled from heaven for rebellion against God; the chief of the apostate angels; the implacable enemy and tempter of the human race. In the New Testament, the word is frequently and erroneously used for demon.

2. A very wicked person, and in ludicrous language, an great evil. In profane language, it is an expletive expressing wonder, vexation, etc.

3. An idol, or false god. Leviticus 17:7. 2 Chronicles 11:15.

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The definitions are linked to my 1611KJV Bible and I want the pure definition of a word, not today's redefined words.

— Denise

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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E'MEW, n. A name of the Cassowary.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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