HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Tuesday - December 18, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [degree]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

degree

DEGREE, n.

1. A step; a distinct portion of space of indefinite extent; a space in progression; as, the army gained the hill by degrees; a balloon rises or descends by slow degrees; and figuratively, we advance in knowledge by slow degrees. Men are yet in the first degree of improvement. It should be their aim to attain to the furthest degree, or the highest degree. There are degrees of vice and virtue.

2. A step or portion of progression, in elevation, quality, dignity or rank; as a man of great degree.

We speak of men of high degree, or of low degree; of superior or inferior degree. It is supposed there are different degrees or orders of angels.

They purchase to themselves a good degree. 1 Tim. 3.

3. In genealogy, a certain distance or remove in the line of descent, determining the proximity of blood; as a relation in the third or fourth degree.

4. Measure; extent. The light is intense to a degree that is intolerable. We suffer an extreme degree of heat or cold.

5. In geometry, a division of a circle, including a three hundred and sixtieth part of its circumference. Hence a degree of latitude is the 360th part of the earths surface north or south of the equator, and a degree of longitude, the same part of the surface east or west of any given meridian.

6. In music, an interval of sound, marked by a line on the scale.

7. In arithmetic, a degree consists of three figures; thus, 270, 360, compose two degrees.

8. A division, space or interval, marked on a mathematical or other instrument; as on a thermometer, or barometer.

9. In colleges and universities, a mark of distinction conferred on students, as a testimony of their proficiency in arts and sciences; giving them a kind of rank, and entitling them to certain privileges. This is usually evidenced by a diploma. Degrees are conferred pro meritis on the alumni of a college; or they are honorary tokens of respect, conferred on strangers of distinguished reputation. The first degree is that of Bachelor of Arts; the second, that of Master of Arts. Honorary degrees are those of Doctor of Divinity, Doctor of Laws, &c. Physicians also receive the degree of Doctor of Medicine.

By degrees, step by step; gradually; by little and little; by moderate advances. Frequent drinking forms by degrees a confirmed habit of intemperance.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [degree]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DEGREE, n.

1. A step; a distinct portion of space of indefinite extent; a space in progression; as, the army gained the hill by degrees; a balloon rises or descends by slow degrees; and figuratively, we advance in knowledge by slow degrees. Men are yet in the first degree of improvement. It should be their aim to attain to the furthest degree, or the highest degree. There are degrees of vice and virtue.

2. A step or portion of progression, in elevation, quality, dignity or rank; as a man of great degree.

We speak of men of high degree, or of low degree; of superior or inferior degree. It is supposed there are different degrees or orders of angels.

They purchase to themselves a good degree. 1 Tim. 3.

3. In genealogy, a certain distance or remove in the line of descent, determining the proximity of blood; as a relation in the third or fourth degree.

4. Measure; extent. The light is intense to a degree that is intolerable. We suffer an extreme degree of heat or cold.

5. In geometry, a division of a circle, including a three hundred and sixtieth part of its circumference. Hence a degree of latitude is the 360th part of the earths surface north or south of the equator, and a degree of longitude, the same part of the surface east or west of any given meridian.

6. In music, an interval of sound, marked by a line on the scale.

7. In arithmetic, a degree consists of three figures; thus, 270, 360, compose two degrees.

8. A division, space or interval, marked on a mathematical or other instrument; as on a thermometer, or barometer.

9. In colleges and universities, a mark of distinction conferred on students, as a testimony of their proficiency in arts and sciences; giving them a kind of rank, and entitling them to certain privileges. This is usually evidenced by a diploma. Degrees are conferred pro meritis on the alumni of a college; or they are honorary tokens of respect, conferred on strangers of distinguished reputation. The first degree is that of Bachelor of Arts; the second, that of Master of Arts. Honorary degrees are those of Doctor of Divinity, Doctor of Laws, &c. Physicians also receive the degree of Doctor of Medicine.

By degrees, step by step; gradually; by little and little; by moderate advances. Frequent drinking forms by degrees a confirmed habit of intemperance.

DE-GREE', n. [Fr. degré; Norm. degret; from L. gradus, Sp. and It. grado, W. rhaz, Syr. ܪܕܐ radah, to go. See Grade and Degrade.]

  1. A step; a distinct portion of space of indefinite extent; a space in progression; as, the army gained the hill by degrees; a balloon rises or descends by slow degrees; and figuratively, we advance in knowledge by slow degrees. Men are yet in the first degree of improvement. It should be their aim to attain to the furthest degree, or the highest degree. There are degrees of vice and virtue.
  2. A step or portion of progression, in elevation, quality, dignity or rank; as, a man of great degree. – Spenser. We speak of men of high degree, or of low degree; of superior or inferior degree. It is supposed there are different degrees or orders of angels. They purchase to themselves a good degree. – 1 Tim iii.
  3. In genealogy; a certain distance or remove in the line of descent, determining the proximity of blood; as, a relation in the third or fourth degree.
  4. Measure; extent. The light is intense to a degree that is intolerable. We suffer an extreme degree of heat or cold.
  5. In geometry, a division of a circle, including a three hundred and sixtieth part of its circumference. Hence, a degree of latitude is the 360th part of the earth's surface north or south of the equator, and a degree of longitude, the same part of the surface east or west of any given meridian.
  6. In music, an interval of sound, marked by a line on the scale. – Rousseau. Busby.
  7. In arithmetic, a degree consists of three figures; thus, 270, 360, compose two degrees.
  8. A division, space or interval, marked on a mathematical or other instrument; as on a thermometer, or barometer.
  9. In colleges and universities, a mark of distinction conferred on students, as a testimony of their proficiency in arts and science; giving them a kind of rank, and entitling them to certain privileges. This is usually evidenced by a diploma. Degrees are conferred pro meritis on the alumni of a college; or they are honorary tokens of respect, conferred on strangers of distinguished reputation. The first degree is that of Bachelor of Arts; the second, that of Master of Arts. Honorary degrees are those of Doctor of Divinity, Doctor of Laws, &c. Physicians also receive the degree of Doctor of Medicine. By degrees, step by step; gradually; by little and little; by moderate advances. Frequent drinking forms by degrees a confirmed habit of intemperance.

De*gree"
  1. A step, stair, or staircase.

    [Obs.]

    By ladders, or else by degree. Rom. of R.

  2. One of a series of progressive steps upward or downward, in quality, rank, acquirement, and the like; a stage in progression; grade; gradation; as, degrees of vice and virtue; to advance by slow degrees; degree of comparison.
  3. The point or step of progression to which a person has arrived; rank or station in life; position.

    "A dame of high degree." Dryden. "A knight is your degree." Shak. "Lord or lady of high degree." Lowell.
  4. Measure of advancement; quality; extent; as, tastes differ in kind as well as in degree.

    The degree of excellence which proclaims genius, is different in different times and different places. Sir. J. Reynolds.

  5. Grade or rank to which scholars are admitted by a college or university, in recognition of their attainments; as, the degree of bachelor of arts, master, doctor, etc.

    * In the United States diplomas are usually given as the evidence of a degree conferred. In the humanities the first degree is that of bachelor of arts (B. A. or A. B.); the second that of master of arts (M. A. or A. M.). The degree of bachelor (of arts, science, divinity, law, etc.) is conferred upon those who complete a prescribed course of undergraduate study. The first degree in medicine is that of doctor of medicine (M. D.). The degrees of master and doctor are sometimes conferred, in course, upon those who have completed certain prescribed postgraduate studies, as doctor of philosophy (Ph. D.); but more frequently the degree of doctor is conferred as a complimentary recognition of eminent services in science or letters, or for public services or distinction (as doctor of laws (LL. D.) or doctor of divinity (D. D.), when they are called honorary degrees.

    The youth attained his bachelor's degree, and left the university. Macaulay.

  6. A certain distance or remove in the line of descent, determining the proximity of blood; one remove in the chain of relationship; as, a relation in the third or fourth degree.

    In the 11th century an opinion began to gain ground in Italy, that third cousins might marry, being in the seventh degree according to the civil law. Hallam.

  7. Three figures taken together in numeration; thus, 140 is one degree, 222,140 two degrees.
  8. State as indicated by sum of exponents; more particularly, the degree of a term is indicated by the sum of the exponents of its literal factors; thus, a2b3c is a term of the sixth degree. The degree of a power, or radical, is denoted by its index, that of an equation by the greatest sum of the exponents of the unknown quantities in any term; thus, ax4 + bx2 = c, and mx2y2 + nyx = p, are both equations of the fourth degree.
  9. A 360th part of the circumference of a circle, which part is taken as the principal unit of measure for arcs and angles. The degree is divided into 60 minutes and the minute into 60 seconds.
  10. A division, space, or interval, marked on a mathematical or other instrument, as on a thermometer.
  11. A line or space of the staff.

    * The short lines and their spaces are added degrees.

    Accumulation of degrees. (Eng. Univ.) See under Accumulation. -- By degrees, step by step; by little and little; by moderate advances. "I'll leave it by degrees." Shak. -- Degree of a curve or surface (Geom.), the number which expresses the degree of the equation of the curve or surface in rectilinear coördinates. A straight line will, in general, meet the curve or surface in a number of points equal to the degree of the curve or surface and no more. -- Degree of latitude (Geog.), on the earth, the distance on a meridian between two parallels of latitude whose latitudes differ from each other by one degree. This distance is not the same on different parts of a meridian, on account of the flattened figure of the earth, being 68.702 statute miles at the equator, and 69.396 at the poles. -- Degree of longitude, the distance on a parallel of latitude between two meridians that make an angle of one degree with each other at the poles -- a distance which varies as the cosine of the latitude, being at the equator 69.16 statute miles. -- To a degree, to an extreme; exceedingly; as, mendacious to a degree.

    It has been said that Scotsmen . . . are . . . grave to a degree on occasions when races more favored by nature are gladsome to excess. Prof. Wilson.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

73

577

64

625

87

612
Degree

DEGREE, noun

1. A step; a distinct portion of space of indefinite extent; a space in progression; as, the army gained the hill by degrees; a balloon rises or descends by slow degrees; and figuratively, we advance in knowledge by slow degrees. Men are yet in the first degree of improvement. It should be their aim to attain to the furthest degree or the highest degree There are degrees of vice and virtue.

2. A step or portion of progression, in elevation, quality, dignity or rank; as a man of great degree

We speak of men of high degree or of low degree; of superior or inferior degree It is supposed there are different degrees or orders of angels.

They purchase to themselves a good degree 1 Timothy 3:13.

3. In genealogy, a certain distance or remove in the line of descent, determining the proximity of blood; as a relation in the third or fourth degree

4. Measure; extent. The light is intense to a degree that is intolerable. We suffer an extreme degree of heat or cold.

5. In geometry, a division of a circle, including a three hundred and sixtieth part of its circumference. Hence a degree of latitude is the 360th part of the earths surface north or south of the equator, and a degree of longitude, the same part of the surface east or west of any given meridian.

6. In music, an interval of sound, marked by a line on the scale.

7. In arithmetic, a degree consists of three figures; thus, 270, 360, compose two degrees.

8. A division, space or interval, marked on a mathematical or other instrument; as on a thermometer, or barometer.

9. In colleges and universities, a mark of distinction conferred on students, as a testimony of their proficiency in arts and sciences; giving them a kind of rank, and entitling them to certain privileges. This is usually evidenced by a diploma. Degrees are conferred pro meritis on the alumni of a college; or they are honorary tokens of respect, conferred on strangers of distinguished reputation. The first degree is that of Bachelor of Arts; the second, that of Master of Arts. Honorary degrees are those of Doctor of Divinity, Doctor of Laws, etc. Physicians also receive the degree of Doctor of Medicine.

By degrees, step by step; gradually; by little and little; by moderate advances. Frequent drinking forms by degrees a confirmed habit of intemperance.

Why 1828?

0
4
 


Now that I am aware of the KJV and how that is the only translation worthy of my time, this dictionary I found out is going to help me to get to the true meaning of the words.

— Rick (Long Beach, CA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

concrescible

CONCRESCIBLE, a. Capable of concreting; that may congeal or be changed from a liquid to a solid state.

They formed a genuine, fixed, concrescible oil.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

155

309

Compact Edition

125

106

CD-ROM

103

82

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.327 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top