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Monday - December 17, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [deep]

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deep

DEEP, a.

1. Extending or being far below the surface; descending far downward; profound ; opposed to shallow; as deep water; a deep pit or well.

2. Low in situation; being or descending far below the adjacent land; as a deep valley.

3. Entering far; piercing a great way. A tree in a good soil takes deep root. A spear struck deep into the flesh.

4. Far from the outer part; secreted.

A spider deep ambushed in her den.

5. Not superficial or obvious; hidden; secret.

He discovereth deep things out of darkness. Job xii.

6. Remote from comprehension.

O Lord, thy thoughts are very deep. Ps. Xcii.

7. Sagacious; penetrating; having the power to enter far into a subject; as a man of deep thought; a deep divine.

8. Artful; contriving; concealing artifice; insidious; designing; as a friend, deep, hollow treacherous.

9. Grave in sound; low; as the deep tones of an organ.

10. Very still; solemn; profound; as deep silence.

11. Thick; black; not to be penetrated by the sight.

Now deeper darkness brooded on the ground.

12. Still; sound; not easily broken or disturbed.

The Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall on Adam. Gen ii.

13. Depressed; sunk low, metaphorically; as deep poverty.

14. Dark; intense; strongly colored; as a deep brown; a deep crimson; a deep blue.

15. Unknown; unintelligible.

A people of deeper speech than thou canst perceive. Is. xxxiii.

16. Heart-felt; penetrating; affecting; as a deep sense of guilt.

17. Intricate; not easily understood or unraveled; as a deep plot or intrigue.

This word often qualifies a verb, like an adverb.

Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.

DEEP, n.

1. The sea; the abyss of waters; the ocean.

He maketh the deep to boil like a pot. Job x1i.

2. A lake; a great collection of water.

Lanch out into the deep, and let down your nets. Luke v.

3. That which is profound, not easily fathomed, or incomprehensible.

Thy judgments are a great deep. Ps. xxxvi.

4. The most still or solemn part; the midst; as, in deep of night.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [deep]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DEEP, a.

1. Extending or being far below the surface; descending far downward; profound ; opposed to shallow; as deep water; a deep pit or well.

2. Low in situation; being or descending far below the adjacent land; as a deep valley.

3. Entering far; piercing a great way. A tree in a good soil takes deep root. A spear struck deep into the flesh.

4. Far from the outer part; secreted.

A spider deep ambushed in her den.

5. Not superficial or obvious; hidden; secret.

He discovereth deep things out of darkness. Job xii.

6. Remote from comprehension.

O Lord, thy thoughts are very deep. Ps. Xcii.

7. Sagacious; penetrating; having the power to enter far into a subject; as a man of deep thought; a deep divine.

8. Artful; contriving; concealing artifice; insidious; designing; as a friend, deep, hollow treacherous.

9. Grave in sound; low; as the deep tones of an organ.

10. Very still; solemn; profound; as deep silence.

11. Thick; black; not to be penetrated by the sight.

Now deeper darkness brooded on the ground.

12. Still; sound; not easily broken or disturbed.

The Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall on Adam. Gen ii.

13. Depressed; sunk low, metaphorically; as deep poverty.

14. Dark; intense; strongly colored; as a deep brown; a deep crimson; a deep blue.

15. Unknown; unintelligible.

A people of deeper speech than thou canst perceive. Is. xxxiii.

16. Heart-felt; penetrating; affecting; as a deep sense of guilt.

17. Intricate; not easily understood or unraveled; as a deep plot or intrigue.

This word often qualifies a verb, like an adverb.

Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring.

DEEP, n.

1. The sea; the abyss of waters; the ocean.

He maketh the deep to boil like a pot. Job x1i.

2. A lake; a great collection of water.

Lanch out into the deep, and let down your nets. Luke v.

3. That which is profound, not easily fathomed, or incomprehensible.

Thy judgments are a great deep. Ps. xxxvi.

4. The most still or solemn part; the midst; as, in deep of night.

DEEP, a. [Sax. deop, dypa; D. diep; G. tief; Sw. diup; Dan. dyb. It seems to be allied to dip and dive, whose radical sense is to thrust or plunge. Qu. W. dwvyn.]

  1. Extending or being far below the surface; descending far downward; profound; opposed to shallow; as, deep water; a deep pit or well.
  2. Low in situation; being or descending far below the adjacent land; as, a deep valley.
  3. Entering far; piercing a great way. A tree in a good soil takes a deep root. A spear struck deep into the flesh.
  4. Far from the outer part; secreted. A spider deep ambushed in her den. – Dryden.
  5. Not superficial or obvious; hidden; secret. He discovereth deep things out of darkness. – Job xii.
  6. Remote from comprehension. O Lord, thy thoughts are very deep. – Ps. xcii.
  7. Sagacious; penetrating; having the power to enter far into a subject; as, a man of deep thought; a deep divine.
  8. Artful; contriving; concealing artifice; insidious; designing; as, a friend, deep, hollow, treacherous.
  9. Grave in sound; low; as, the deep tones of an organ.
  10. Very still; solemn; profound; as, deep silence.
  11. Thick; black; not to be penetrated by the sight. Now deeper darkness brooded on the ground. – Hoole.
  12. Still; sound; not easily broken or disturbed. The Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall on Adam. – Gen. ii.
  13. Depressed; sunk low, metaphorically; as, deep poverty.
  14. Dark; intense; strongly colored; as, a deep brown; a deep crimson; a deep blue.
  15. Unknown; unintelligible. A people of deeper speech than thou canst perceive. – Is. xxxii.
  16. Heart-felt; penetrating; affecting; as, a deep sense of guilt.
  17. Intricate; not easily understood or unraveled; as, a deep plot or intrigue. This word often qualifies a verb, like an adverb. Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring. – Pope.

DEEP, n.

  1. The sea; the abyss of waters; the ocean. He maketh the deep to boil like a pot. – Job xli.
  2. A lake; a great collection of water. Launch out into the deep, and let down your nets. – Luke v.
  3. That which is profound, not easily fathomed, or incomprehensible. Thy judgments are a great deep. – Ps. xxxvi.
  4. The most still or solemn part; the midst; as, in deep of night. – Shak. Philips.

Deep
  1. Extending far below the surface; of great perpendicular dimension (measured from the surface downward, and distinguished from high, which is measured upward); far to the bottom; having a certain depth; as, a deep sea.

    The water where the brook is deep. Shak.

  2. To a great depth; with depth; far down; profoundly; deeply.

    Deep-versed in books, and shallow in himself. Milton.

    Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring. Pope.

    * Deep, in its usual adverbial senses, is often prefixed to an adjective; as, deep-chested, deep-cut, deep-seated, deep-toned, deep-voiced, "deep-uddered kine."

  3. That which is deep, especially deep water, as the sea or ocean; an abyss; a great depth.

    Courage from the deeps of knowledge springs. Cowley.

    The hollow deep of hell resounded. Milton.

    Blue Neptune storms, the bellowing deeps resound. Pope.

  4. Extending far back from the front or outer part; of great horizontal dimension (measured backward from the front or nearer part, mouth, etc.); as, a deep cave or recess or wound; a gallery ten seats deep; a company of soldiers six files deep.

    Shadowing squadrons deep. Milton.

    Safely in harbor
    Is the king's ship in the deep nook.
    Shak.

  5. That which is profound, not easily fathomed, or incomprehensible; a moral or spiritual depth or abyss.

    Thy judgments are a great deep. Ps. xxxvi. 6.

    Deep of night, the most quiet or profound part of night; dead of night.

    The deep of night is crept upon our talk. Shak.

  6. Low in situation; lying far below the general surface; as, a deep valley.
  7. Hard to penetrate or comprehend; profound; -- opposed to shallow or superficial; intricate; mysterious; not obvious; obscure; as, a deep subject or plot.

    Speculations high or deep. Milton.

    A question deep almost as the mystery of life. De Quincey.

    O Lord, . . . thy thoughts are very deep. Ps. xcii. 5.

  8. Of penetrating or far-reaching intellect; not superficial; thoroughly skilled; sagacious; cunning.

    Deep clerks she dumbs. Shak.

  9. Profound; thorough; complete; unmixed; intense; heavy; heartfelt; as, deep distress; deep melancholy; deep horror.

    "Deep despair." Milton. "Deep silence." Milton. "Deep sleep." Gen. ii. 21. "Deeper darkness." >Hoole. "Their deep poverty." 2 Cor. viii. 2.

    An attitude of deep respect. Motley.

  10. Strongly colored; dark; intense; not light or thin; as, deep blue or crimson.
  11. Of low tone; full-toned; not high or sharp; grave; heavy.

    "The deep thunder." Byron.

    The bass of heaven's deep organ. Milton.

  12. Muddy; boggy; sandy; -- said of roads.

    Chaucer.

    The ways in that vale were very deep. Clarendon.

    A deep line of operations (Military), a long line. -- Deep mourning (Costume), mourning complete and strongly marked, the garments being not only all black, but also composed of lusterless materials and of such fashion as is identified with mourning garments.

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Deep

DEEP, adjective

1. Extending or being far below the surface; descending far downward; profound ; opposed to shallow; as deep water; a deep pit or well.

2. Low in situation; being or descending far below the adjacent land; as a deep valley.

3. Entering far; piercing a great way. A tree in a good soil takes deep root. A spear struck deep into the flesh.

4. Far from the outer part; secreted.

A spider deep ambushed in her den.

5. Not superficial or obvious; hidden; secret.

He discovereth deep things out of darkness. Job 12:22.

6. Remote from comprehension.

O Lord, thy thoughts are very deep Ps. Xcii.

7. Sagacious; penetrating; having the power to enter far into a subject; as a man of deep thought; a deep divine.

8. Artful; contriving; concealing artifice; insidious; designing; as a friend, deep hollow treacherous.

9. Grave in sound; low; as the deep tones of an organ.

10. Very still; solemn; profound; as deep silence.

11. Thick; black; not to be penetrated by the sight.

Now deeper darkness brooded on the ground.

12. Still; sound; not easily broken or disturbed.

The Lord God caused a deep sleep to fall on Adam. Genesis 2:21.

13. Depressed; sunk low, metaphorically; as deep poverty.

14. Dark; intense; strongly colored; as a deep brown; a deep crimson; a deep blue.

15. Unknown; unintelligible.

A people of deeper speech than thou canst perceive. Isaiah 33:19.

16. Heart-felt; penetrating; affecting; as a deep sense of guilt.

17. Intricate; not easily understood or unraveled; as a deep plot or intrigue.

This word often qualifies a verb, like an adverb.

Drink deep or taste not the Pierian spring.

DEEP, noun

1. The sea; the abyss of waters; the ocean.

He maketh the deep to boil like a pot. Job x1i.

2. A lake; a great collection of water.

Lanch out into the deep and let down your nets. Luke 5:4.

3. That which is profound, not easily fathomed, or incomprehensible.

Thy judgments are a great deep Psalms 36:6.

4. The most still or solemn part; the midst; as, in deep of night.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

ichnography

ICHNOG'RAPHY, n. [Gr. a footstep, and to describe.] In perspective, the view of any thing cut off by a plane parallel to the horizon, just at the base of it, a ground-plot.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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