HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Tuesday - December 18, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [decline]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

decline

DECLI'NE, v.i. [L. to lean.]



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [decline]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DECLI'NE, v.i. [L. to lean.]

DE-CLINE', n.

Literally, a leaning from: hence, a falling off; a tendency to a worse state; diminution or decay; deterioration; as, the decline of life; the decline of strength; the decline of virtue and religion; the decline of revenues; the decline of agriculture, commerce or manufactures; the decline of learning.


DE-CLINE', v.i. [L. declino; de and clino, to lean. See Lean.]

  1. To lean downward; as, the head declines toward the earth.
  2. To lean from a right line; to deviate; in a literal sense.
  3. To lean or deviate from rectitude, in a moral sense; to leave the path of truth or justice, or the course prescribed. Yet do I not decline from thy testimonies. – Ps. cxix.157.
  4. To fall; to tend or draw toward the close; as, the day declines.
  5. To avoid or shun; to refuse; not to comply; not to do; as, he declined to take any part in the concern.
  6. To fall; to fail; to sink; to decay; to be impaired; to tend to a less perfect state; as, the vigor of youth declines in age; health declines; virtue declines; religion declines; national credit and prosperity decline, under a corrupt administration.
  7. To sink; to diminish; to fall in value; as, the prices of land and goods decline at the close of a war.

DE-CLINE', v.t.

  1. To bend downward; to bring down. In melancholy deep, with head declined. – Thomson.
  2. To bend to one side; to move from a fixed point or right line.
  3. To shun or avoid; to refuse; not to engage in; to be cautious not to do or interfere; not to accept or comply with; as, he declined the contest; he declined the offer; he declined the business or pursuit.
  4. To inflect; to change the termination of a word, for forming the oblique cases; as, Dominus, Domini, Domino, Dominum, Domine.

De*cline"
  1. To bend, or lean downward; to take a downward direction; to bend over or hang down, as from weakness, weariness, despondency, etc.; to condescend.

    "With declining head." Shak.

    He . . . would decline even to the lowest of his family. Lady Hutchinson.

    Disdaining to decline,
    Slowly he falls, amidst triumphant cries.
    Byron.

    The ground at length became broken and declined rapidly. Sir W. Scott.

  2. To bend downward; to bring down; to depress; to cause to bend, or fall.

    In melancholy deep, with head declined. Thomson.

    And now fair Phoebus gan decline in haste
    His weary wagon to the western vale.
    Spenser.

  3. A falling off; a tendency to a worse state; diminution or decay; deterioration; also, the period when a thing is tending toward extinction or a less perfect state; as, the decline of life; the decline of strength; the decline of virtue and religion.

    Their fathers lived in the decline of literature. Swift.

  4. To tend or draw towards a close, decay, or extinction; to tend to a less perfect state; to become diminished or impaired; to fail; to sink; to diminish; to lessen; as, the day declines; virtue declines; religion declines; business declines.

    That empire must decline
    Whose chief support and sinews are of coin.
    Waller.

    And presume to know . . .
    Who thrives, and who declines.
    Shak.

  5. To cause to decrease or diminish.

    [Obs.] "You have declined his means." Beau. *** Fl.

    He knoweth his error, but will not seek to decline it. Burton.

  6. That period of a disorder or paroxysm when the symptoms begin to abate in violence; as, the decline of a fever.
  7. To turn or bend aside; to deviate; to stray; to withdraw; as, a line that declines from straightness; conduct that declines from sound morals.

    Yet do I not decline from thy testimonies. Ps. cxix. 157.

  8. To put or turn aside] to turn off or away from; to refuse to undertake or comply with; reject; to shun; to avoid; as, to decline an offer; to decline a contest; he declined any participation with them.

    Could I
    Decline this dreadful hour?
    Massinger.

  9. A gradual sinking and wasting away of the physical faculties; any wasting disease, esp. pulmonary consumption; as, to die of a decline.

    Dunglison.

    Syn. -- Decline, Decay, Consumption. Decline marks the first stage in a downward progress; decay indicates the second stage, and denotes a tendency to ultimate destruction; consumption marks a steady decay from an internal exhaustion of strength. The health may experience a decline from various causes at any period of life; it is naturally subject to decay with the advance of old age; consumption may take place at almost any period of life, from disease which wears out the constitution. In popular language decline is often used as synonymous with consumption. By a gradual decline, states and communities lose their strength and vigor; by progressive decay, they are stripped of their honor, stability, and greatness; by a consumption of their resources and vital energy, they are led rapidly on to a completion of their existence.

  10. To turn away; to shun; to refuse; -- the opposite of accept or consent; as, he declined, upon principle.
  11. To inflect, or rehearse in order the changes of grammatical form of; as, to decline a noun or an adjective.

    * Now restricted to such words as have case inflections; but formerly it was applied both to declension and conjugation.

    After the first declining of a noun and a verb. Ascham.

  12. To run through from first to last; to repeat like a schoolboy declining a noun.

    [R.] Shak.
1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

73

577

64

625

87

612
Decline

DECLI'NE, verb intransitive [Latin to lean.]

1. To lean downward; as, the head declines towards the earth.

2. To lean from a right line; to deviate; in a literal sense.

3. To lean or deviate from rectitude, in a moral sense; to leave the path of truth or justice, or the course prescribed.

Yet do I not decline from thy testimonies. Psalms 119:157.

4. To fall; to tend or draw towards the close; as, the day declines.

5. To avoid or shun; to refuse; not to comply; not to do; as, he declined to take any part in the concern.

6. To fall; to fail; to sink; to decay; to be impaired; to tend to a less perfect state; as, the vigor of youth declines in age; health declines; virtue declines; religion declines; national credit and prosperity decline under a corrupt administration.

7. To sink; to diminish; to fall in value; as, the prices of land and goods decline at the close of a war.

DECLI'NE, verb transitive

1. To bend downward; to bring down.

In melancholy deep, with head declined.

2. To bend to one side; to move from a fixed point or right line.

3. To shun or avoid; to refuse; not to engage in; to be cautious not to do or interfere; not to accept or comply with; as, he declined the contest; he declined the offer; he declined the business or pursuit.

4. To inflect; to change the termination of a word, for forming the oblique cases; as, Dominus, Domini, Domino, Dominum, Domine.

DECLI'NE, noun Literally, a leaning from; hence, a falling off; a tendency to a worse state; diminution or decay; deterioration; as the decline of life; the decline of strength; the decline of virtue and religion; the decline of revenues; the decline of agriculture, commerce or manufactures; the decline of learning.

Why 1828?

0
2
 


Studying the Bible and understanding the use of words in the KJV

— Lars (Haslett, MI)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

deflorate

DEFLORATE, a. [L. To deflour.] In botany, having cast its farin, pollen, or fecundating dust.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

155

309

Compact Edition

125

106

CD-ROM

103

82

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.331 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top