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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [death]

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death

DEATH, n. deth.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [death]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DEATH, n. deth.

DEATH, n. [deth; Sax. death; D. dood; G. tod; Sw. död; Dan. död. See Die and Dead.]

  1. That state of a being, animal or vegetable, but more particularly of an animal, in which there is total and permanent cessation of all the vital functions, when the organs have not only ceased to act, but have lost the susceptibility of renewed action. Thus the cessation of respiration and circulation in an animal may not be death, for during hybernation some animals become entirely torpid, and some animals and vegetables may be subjected to a fixed state by frost, but being capable of revived activity, they are not dead.
  2. The state of the dead; as, the gates of death. Job xxxviii.
  3. The manner of dying. Thou shalt die the deaths of them that are slain in the midst of the seas. – Ezek. xxviii. Let me die the death of the righteous. – Num. xxiii.
  4. The image of mortality represented by a skeleton; as, a death's head. – Shak.
  5. Murder; as, a man of death. – Bacon.
  6. Cause of death. We say, he caught his death. O thou man of God, there is death in the pot. – 2 Kings iv.
  7. Destroyer or agent of death; as, he will be the death of his poor father.
  8. In poetry, the means or instrument of death; as, an arrow is called the feathered death; a ball, a leaden death. Deaths invisible come winged with fire. – Dryden.
  9. In theology, perpetual separation from God, and eternal torments; called the second death. Rev. ii.
  10. Separation or alienation of the soul from God; a being under the dominion of sin, and destitute of grace or divine life; called spiritual death. We know that we have passed from death to life because we love the brethren. – 1 John iii. Luke i. Civil death, is the separation of a man from civil society, or from the enjoyment of civil rights; as by banishment, abjuration of the realm, entering into a monastery, &c. – Blackstone.

Death
  1. The cessation of all vital phenomena without capability of resuscitation, either in animals or plants.

    * Local death is going on at all times and in all parts of the living body, in which individual cells and elements are being cast off and replaced by new; a process essential to life. General death is of two kinds; death of the body as a whole (somatic or systemic death), and death of the tissues. By the former is implied the absolute cessation of the functions of the brain, the circulatory and the respiratory organs; by the latter the entire disappearance of the vital actions of the ultimate structural constituents of the body. When death takes place, the body as a whole dies first, the death of the tissues sometimes not occurring until after a considerable interval. Huxley.

  2. Total privation or loss; extinction; cessation; as, the death of memory.

    The death of a language can not be exactly compared with the death of a plant. J. Peile.

  3. Manner of dying; act or state of passing from life.

    A death that I abhor. Shak.

    Let me die the death of the righteous. Num. xxiii. 10.

  4. Cause of loss of life.

    Swiftly flies the feathered death. Dryden.

    He caught his death the last county sessions. Addison.

  5. Personified: The destroyer of life, -- conventionally represented as a skeleton with a scythe.

    Death! great proprietor of all. Young.

    And I looked, and behold a pale horse; and his name that sat on him was Death. Rev. vi. 8.

  6. Danger of death.

    "In deaths oft." 2 Cor. xi. 23.
  7. Murder; murderous character.

    Not to suffer a man of death to live. Bacon.

  8. Loss of spiritual life.

    To be carnally minded is death. Rom. viii. 6.

  9. Anything so dreadful as to be like death.

    It was death to them to think of entertaining such doctrines. Atterbury.

    And urged him, so that his soul was vexed unto death. Judg. xvi. 16.

    * Death is much used adjectively and as the first part of a compound, meaning, in general, of or pertaining to death, causing or presaging death; as, deathbed or death bed; deathblow or death blow, etc.

    Black death. See Black death, in the Vocabulary. -- Civil death, the separation of a man from civil society, or the debarring him from the enjoyment of civil rights, as by banishment, attainder, abjuration of the realm, entering a monastery, etc. Blackstone. -- Death adder. (Zoöl.) (a) A kind of viper found in South Africa (Acanthophis tortor); -- so called from the virulence of its venom. (b) A venomous Australian snake of the family Elapidæ, of several species, as the Hoplocephalus superbus and Acanthopis antarctica. -- Death bell, a bell that announces a death.

    The death bell thrice was heard to ring. Mickle.

    -- Death candle, a light like that of a candle, viewed by the superstitious as presaging death. -- Death damp, a cold sweat at the coming on of death. -- Death fire, a kind of ignis fatuus supposed to forebode death.

    And round about in reel and rout,
    The death fires danced at night.
    Coleridge.

    -- Death grapple, a grapple or struggle for life. -- Death in life, a condition but little removed from death; a living death. [Poetic] "Lay lingering out a five years' death in life." Tennyson. - - Death knell, a stroke or tolling of a bell, announcing a death. -- Death rate, the relation or ratio of the number of deaths to the population.

    At all ages the death rate is higher in towns than in rural districts. Darwin.

    -- Death rattle, a rattling or gurgling in the throat of a dying person. -- Death's door, the boundary of life; the partition dividing life from death. -- Death stroke, a stroke causing death. -- Death throe, the spasm of death. -- Death token, the signal of approaching death. -- Death warrant. (a) (Law) An order from the proper authority for the execution of a criminal. (b) That which puts an end to expectation, hope, or joy. -- Death wound. (a) A fatal wound or injury. (b) (Naut.) The springing of a fatal leak. -- Spiritual death (Scripture), the corruption and perversion of the soul by sin, with the loss of the favor of God. -- The gates of death, the grave.

    Have the gates of death been opened unto thee? Job xxxviii. 17.

    -- The second death, condemnation to eternal separation from God. Rev. ii. 11. -- To be the death of, to be the cause of death to; to make die. "It was one who should be the death of both his parents." Milton.

    Syn. -- Death, Decease, Demise, Departure, Release. Death applies to the termination of every form of existence, both animal and vegetable; the other words only to the human race. Decease is the term used in law for the removal of a human being out of life in the ordinary course of nature. Demise was formerly confined to decease of princes, but is now sometimes used of distinguished men in general; as, the demise of Mr. Pitt. Departure and release are peculiarly terms of Christian affection and hope. A violent death is not usually called a decease. Departure implies a friendly taking leave of life. Release implies a deliverance from a life of suffering or sorrow.

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Death

DEATH, noun deth.

1. That state of a being, animal or vegetable, but more particularly of an animal, in which there is a total and permanent cessation of all the vital functions, when the organs have not only ceased to act, but have lost the susceptibility of renewed action. Thus the cessation of respiration and circulation in an animal may not be death for during hybernation some animals become entirely torpid, and some animals and vegetables may be subjected to a fixed state by frost, but being capable of revived activity, they are not dead.

2. The state of the dead; as the gates of death Job 38:17.

3. The manner of dying.

Thou shalt die the deaths of them that are slain in the midst of the seas. Ezekiel 28:8.

Let me die the death of the righteous. Numbers 23:10.

4. The image of mortality represented by a skeleton; as a death's head.

5. Murder; as a man of death

6. Cause of death

O thou man of God, there is death in the pot. 2 Kings 4:40.

We say, he caught his death

7. Destroyer or agent of death; as, he will be the death of his poor father.

8. In poetry, the means or instrument of death; as an arrow is called the feathered death; a ball, a leaden death

DEATHs invisible come winged with fire.

9. In theology, perpetual separation from God, and eternal torments; called the second death Revelation 2:10.

10. Separation or alienation of the soul from God; a being under the dominion of sin, and destitute of grace or divine life; called spiritual death

We know that we have passed from death to life, because we love the brethren. 1 John 3:1. Luke I.

Civil death is the separation of a man from civil society, or from the enjoyment of civil rights; as by banishment, abjuration of the realm, entering into a monastery, etc.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

thus

THUS, adv. In this or that manner; on this wise; as, thus saith the Lord; the Pharisee prayed thus.

Thus did Noah, according to all that God commanded him. Gen.6.

1. To this degree or extent; as thus wise; thus peaceable.

Thus far extend, thus far thy bounds--

2. In the phrase, thus much, it seems to be an adjective, equivalent to this much.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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