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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [dean]

Evolution (or devolution) of this word [dean]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DEAN, n.

DEAN, n. [Fr. doyen, the eldest of a corporation; Arm. dean; Sp. dean, decano; Port. deam, decano; It. decano; from L. decanus, the leader of a file ten deep, the head of a college, from decem, Gr. δεκα, W. deg, ten; so named because originally he was set over ten canons or prebendaries. – Ayliffe.]

  1. In England, an ecclesiastical dignitary in cathedral and collegiate churches, and the head of a chapter; the second dignitary of a diocese. Ancient deans are elected by the chapter in virtue of a conge d'elire from the king and letters missive of recommendation; but in the chapters founded by Henry VIII, out of the spoils of dissolved monasteries, the deanery is donative, and the installation merely by the king's letters patent. – Encyc.
  2. An officer in each college of the universities in England. – Warton.
  3. In the United States, a registrar in a medical school. Rural dean, or arch-presbyter, had originally jurisdiction over ten churches; but afterward he became only the bishop's substitute, to grant letters of administration, probate of wills, &c. His office is now lost in that of the archdeacon and chancellor. – Encyc. Dean of a monastery, a superior established under the abbot, to ease him in taking care of ten monks. Hence his name. – Encyc. Dean and Chapter, are the bishop's council, to aid him with their advice in affairs of religion, and in the temporal concerns of his see. – Encyc.

Dean
  1. A dignitary or presiding officer in certain ecclesiastical and lay bodies; esp., an ecclesiastical dignitary, subordinate to a bishop.

    Dean of cathedral church, the chief officer of a chapter; he is an ecclesiastical magistrate next in degree to bishop, and has immediate charge of the cathedral and its estates. -- Dean of peculiars, a dean holding a preferment which has some peculiarity relative to spiritual superiors and the jurisdiction exercised in it. [Eng.] -- Rural dean, one having, under the bishop, the especial care and inspection of the clergy within certain parishes or districts of the diocese.

  2. The collegiate officer in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, England, who, besides other duties, has regard to the moral condition of the college.

    Shipley.
  3. The head or presiding officer in the faculty of some colleges or universities.
  4. A registrar or secretary of the faculty in a department of a college, as in a medical, or theological, or scientific department.

    [U.S.]
  5. The chief or senior of a company on occasion of ceremony; as, the dean of the diplomatic corps; -- so called by courtesy.

    Cardinal dean, the senior cardinal bishop of the college of cardinals at Rome. Shipley. -- Dean and chapter, the legal corporation and governing body of a cathedral. It consists of the dean, who is chief, and his canons or prebendaries. -- Dean of arches, the lay judge of the court of arches. -- Dean of faculty, the president of an incorporation or barristers; specifically, the president of the incorporation of advocates in Edinburgh. -- Dean of guild, a magistrate of Scotch burghs, formerly, and still, in some burghs, chosen by the Guildry, whose duty is to superintend the erection of new buildings and see that they conform to the law. -- Dean of a monastery, Monastic dean, a monastic superior over ten monks. -- Dean's stall. See Decanal stall, under Decanal.

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Dean

DEAN, noun

1. In England, am ecclesiastical dignitary in cathedral and collegiate churches, and the head of a chapter; the second dignitary of a diocese. Ancient deans are elected by the chapter in virtue of a conge d'elire from the king and letters missive of recommendation; but in the chapters founded by Henry VIII., out of the spoils of dissolved monasteries, the deanery is donative, and the installation merely by the kings letters patent.

2. An officer in each college of the universities in England.

3. In the U. States, an officer in a medical school.

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Most words in the Authorized KJV Bible are found in this dictionary.

— DARLOU (Poulsbo, WA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

steer

STEER, n. A young male of the ox kind or common ox. It is rendered in Dutch, a bull; but in the United States, this name is generally given to a castrated male of the ox kind, from two to four years old.

With solemn pomp then sacrificd a steer.

STEER, v.t. [G., to hinder, restrain, repress, to curb, to steer, to pilot, to aid, help, support. The verb si connected with or derived from steuer, a rudder, a helm, aid, help, subsidy, impost, tax, contribution.]

1. To direct; to govern; particularly, to direct and govern the course of a ship by the movements of the helm. Hence,

2. To direct; to guide; to show the way or course to.

That with a staff his feeble steps did steer.

STEER, v.i.

1. To direct and govern a ship or other vessel in its course. Formerly seamen steered by the stars; they ow steer by the compass.

A ship--where the wind veers oft, as oft so steers and shifts her sail.

2. To be directed and governed; as, a ship steers with ease.

3. To conduct ones self; to take or pursue a course or way.

STEER, n. A rudder or helm. [Not in use.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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