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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DEAD,

DEAD, a. [ded; Sax. dead, probably contracted from deged; D. dood; G. todt; Sw. död; Dan. död. See Die.]

  1. Deprived or destitute of life; that state of a being, animal or vegetable, in which the organs of motion and life have ceased to perform their functions, and have become incapable of performing them, or of being restored to a state of activity. The men are dead who sought thy life. – Ex. iv. It is sometimes followed by of before the cause of death; as, dead of hunger, or of a fever.
  2. Having never had life, or having been deprived of vital action before birth; as, the child was born dead.
  3. Without life; inanimate. All, all but truth, drops dead-born from the press. – Pope.
  4. Without vegetable life; as, a dead tree.
  5. Imitating death; deep or sound; as, a dead sleep.
  6. Perfectly still; motionless as death; as, a dead calm; a dead weight.
  7. Empty; vacant; not enlivened by variety; as, a dead void space, a dead plain. – Dryden. We say also, a dead level, for a perfectly level surface.
  8. Unemployed; useless; unprofitable. A man's faculties may lie dead, or his goods remain dead on his hands. So dead capital or stock is that which produces no profit.
  9. Dull; inactive; as, a dead sale of commodities.
  10. Dull; gloomy; still; not enlivened; as, a dead winter; a dead season. – Addison.
  11. Still; deep; obscure; as the dead darkness of the night.
  12. Dull; not lively; not resembling life; as, the dead coloring of a piece; a dead eye.
  13. Dull; heavy; as, a dead sound. – Boyle.
  14. Dull; frigid; lifeless; cold; not animated; not affecting; used of prayer. – Addison.
  15. Tasteless; vapid; spiritless; used of liquors.
  16. Uninhabitated; as, dead walls. – Arbuthnot.
  17. Dull; without natural force or efficacy; not lively or brisk; as, a dead fire.
  18. In a state of spiritual death; void of grace; lying under the power of sin.
  19. Impotent; unable to procreate. – Rom. iv.
  20. Decayed in grace. Thou hast a name that thou livest, and art dead. – Rev. iii.
  21. Not proceeding from spiritual life; not producing good works; as, faith without works is dead. – James ii.
  22. Proceeding from corrupt nature, not from spiritual life or a gracious principle; as, dead works. – Heb. ix. 14.
  23. In law, cut off from the rights of a citizen; deprived of the power of enjoying the rights of property; as, one banished or becoming a monk is civilly dead. – Blackstone. Dead language, a language which is no longer spoken or in common use by a people, and known only in writings; as the Hebrew, Greek and Latin. Dead rising or rising line, the parts of a ship's floor or bottom throughout her length, where the floor timber is terminated on the lower futtock. – Mar. Dict.

DEAD, n. [ded.]

  1. The dead signifies dead men. Ye shall not make cuttings for the dead. – Lev. xix.
  2. The state of the dead; or death. This is John the Baptist; he is risen from the dead. – Matt. xiv. This may be understood thus – he is risen from among the dead.

DEAD, n. [ded.]

The time when there is a remarkable stillness or gloom; depth; as, the midst of winter or of night. The dead of winter, the dead of night, are familiar expressions.


DEAD, v.i. [ded.]

To lose life or force. [Obs.] Bacon.


DEAD, v.t. [ded.]

To deprive of life, force or vigor. [Obs.] Bacon.


Dead
  1. Deprived of life; -- opposed to alive and living; reduced to that state of a being in which the organs of motion and life have irrevocably ceased to perform their functions; as, a dead tree; a dead man.

    "The queen, my lord, is dead." Shak.

    The crew, all except himself, were dead of hunger. Arbuthnot.

    Seek him with candle, bring him dead or living. Shak.

  2. To a degree resembling death; to the last degree; completely; wholly.

    [Colloq.]

    I was tired of reading, and dead sleepy. Dickens.

    Dead drunk, so drunk as to be unconscious.

  3. The most quiet or deathlike time; the period of profoundest repose, inertness, or gloom; as, the dead of winter.

    When the drum beat at dead of night. Campbell.

  4. To make dead; to deaden; to deprive of life, force, or vigor.

    [Obs.]

    Heaven's stern decree,
    With many an ill, hath numbed and deaded me.
    Chapman.

  5. To die; to lose life or force.

    [Obs.]

    So iron, as soon as it is out of the fire, deadeth straightway. Bacon.

  6. Carrying no current, or producing no useful effect; -- said of a conductor in a dynamo or motor, also of a telegraph wire which has no instrument attached and, therefore, is not in use.
  7. Destitute of life; inanimate; as, dead matter.
  8. One who is dead; -- commonly used collectively.

    And Abraham stood up from before his dead. Gen. xxiii. 3.

  9. Out of play; regarded as out of the game; -- said of a ball, a piece, or a player under certain conditions in cricket, baseball, checkers, and some other games.

    [In golf], a ball is said to lie dead when it lies so near the hole that the player is certain to hole it in the next stroke. Encyc. of Sport.

  10. Resembling death in appearance or quality; without show of life; deathlike; as, a dead sleep.
  11. Still as death; motionless; inactive; useless; as, dead calm; a dead load or weight.
  12. So constructed as not to transmit sound; soundless; as, a dead floor.
  13. Unproductive; bringing no gain; unprofitable; as, dead capital; dead stock in trade.
  14. Lacking spirit; dull; lusterless; cheerless; as, dead eye; dead fire; dead color, etc.
  15. Monotonous or unvaried; as, a dead level or pain; a dead wall.

    "The ground is a dead flat." C. Reade.
  16. Sure as death; unerring; fixed; complete; as, a dead shot; a dead certainty.

    I had them a dead bargain. Goldsmith.

  17. Bringing death; deadly.

    Shak.
  18. Wanting in religious spirit and vitality; as, dead faith; dead works.

    "Dead in trespasses." Eph. ii. 1.
  19. Flat; without gloss; -- said of painting which has been applied purposely to have this effect.

    (b)
  20. Cut off from the rights of a citizen; deprived of the power of enjoying the rights of property; as, one banished or becoming a monk is civilly dead.
  21. Not imparting motion or power; as, the dead spindle of a lathe, etc. See Spindle.

    Dead ahead (Naut.), directly ahead; - - said of a ship or any object, esp. of the wind when blowing from that point toward which a vessel would go. -- Dead angle (Mil.), an angle or space which can not be seen or defended from behind the parapet. -- Dead block, either of two wooden or iron blocks intended to serve instead of buffers at the end of a freight car. -- Dead calm (Naut.), no wind at all. -- Dead center, or Dead point (Mach.), either of two points in the orbit of a crank, at which the crank and connecting rod lie a straight line. It corresponds to the end of a stroke; as, A and B are dead centers of the crank mechanism in which the crank C drives, or is driven by, the lever L. -- Dead color (Paint.), a color which has no gloss upon it. -- Dead coloring (Oil paint.), the layer of colors, the preparation for what is to follow. In modern painting this is usually in monochrome. -- Dead door (Shipbuilding), a storm shutter fitted to the outside of the quarter-gallery door. -- Dead flat (Naut.), the widest or midship frame. -- Dead freight (Mar. Law), a sum of money paid by a person who charters a whole vessel but fails to make out a full cargo. The payment is made for the unoccupied capacity. Abbott. -- Dead ground (Mining), the portion of a vein in which there is no ore. -- Dead hand, a hand that can not alienate, as of a person civilly dead. "Serfs held in dead hand." Morley. See Mortmain. -- Dead head (Naut.), a rough block of wood used as an anchor buoy. -- Dead heat, a heat or course between two or more race horses, boats, etc., in which they come out exactly equal, so that neither wins. -- Dead horse, an expression applied to a debt for wages paid in advance. [Law] -- Dead language, a language which is no longer spoken or in common use by a people, and is known only in writings, as the Hebrew, Greek, and Latin. -- Dead letter. (a) A letter which, after lying for a certain fixed time uncalled for at the post office to which it was directed, is then sent to the general post office to be opened. (b) That which has lost its force or authority; as, the law has become a dead letter. -- Dead-letter office, a department of the general post office where dead letters are examined and disposed of. -- Dead level, a term applied to a flat country. -- Dead lift, a direct lift, without assistance from mechanical advantage, as from levers, pulleys, etc.; hence, an extreme emergency. "(As we say) at a dead lift." Robynson (More's Utopia). -- Dead line (Mil.), a line drawn within or around a military prison, to cross which involves for a prisoner the penalty of being instantly shot. -- Dead load (Civil Engin.), a constant, motionless load, as the weight of a structure, in distinction from a moving load, as a train of cars, or a variable pressure, as of wind. -- Dead march (Mus.), a piece of solemn music intended to be played as an accompaniment to a funeral procession. -- Dead nettle (Bot.), a harmless plant with leaves like a nettle (Lamium album). -- Dead oil (Chem.), the heavy oil obtained in the distillation of coal tar, and containing phenol, naphthalus, etc. -- Dead plate (Mach.), a solid covering over a part of a fire grate, to prevent the entrance of air through that part. -- Dead pledge, a mortgage. See Mortgage. -- Dead point. (Mach.) See Dead center. -- Dead reckoning (Naut.), the method of determining the place of a ship from a record kept of the courses sailed as given by compass, and the distance made on each course as found by log, with allowance for leeway, etc., without the aid of celestial observations. -- Dead rise, the transverse upward curvature of a vessel's floor. -- Dead rising, an elliptical line drawn on the sheer plan to determine the sweep of the floorheads throughout the ship's length. -- Dead-Sea apple. See under Apple. -- Dead set. See under Set. -- Dead shot. (a) An unerring marksman. (b) A shot certain to be made. -- Dead smooth, the finest cut made; -- said of files. -- Dead wall (Arch.), a blank wall unbroken by windows or other openings. -- Dead water (Naut.), the eddy water closing in under a ship's stern when sailing. -- Dead weight. (a) A heavy or oppressive burden. Dryden. (b) (Shipping) A ship's lading, when it consists of heavy goods; or, the heaviest part of a ship's cargo. (c) (Railroad) The weight of rolling stock, the live weight being the load. Knight. -- Dead wind (Naut.), a wind directly ahead, or opposed to the ship's course. -- To be dead, to die. [Obs.]

    I deme thee, thou must algate be dead. Chaucer.

    Syn. -- Inanimate; deceased; extinct. See Lifeless.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Dead

DEAD,

1. Deprived or destitute of life; that state of a being, animal or vegetable, in which the organs of motion and life have ceased to perform their functions, and have become incapable of performing them, or of being restored to a state of activity.

The men are dead who sought thy life. Exodus 4:19.

It is sometimes followed by of before the cause of death; as, dead of hunger, or of a fever.

2. Having never had life, or having been deprived of vital action before birth; as, the child was born dead

3. Without life; inanimate.

All, all but truth, drops dead-born from the press.

4. Without vegetable life; as a dead tree.

5. Imitating death; deep or sound; as a dead sleep.

6. Perfectly still; motionless as death; as a dead calm; a dead weight.

7. Empty; vacant; not enlivened by variety; as a dead void space; a dead plain.

We say also, a dead level, for a perfectly level surface.

8. Unemployed; useless; unprofitable. A man's faculties may lie dead or his goods remain dead on his hands. So dead capital or stock is that which produces no profit.

9. Dull; inactive; as a dead sale of commodities.

10. Dull; gloomy; still; not enlivened; as a dead winter; a dead season.

11. Still; deep; obscure; as the dead darkness of the night.

12. Dull; not lively; not resembling life; as the dead coloring of a piece; a dead eye.

13. Dull; heavy; as a dead sound.

14. Dull; frigid; lifeless; cold; not animated; not affecting; used of prayer.

15. Tasteless; vapid; spiritless; used of liquors.

16. Uninhabited; as dead walls.

17. Dull; without natural force or efficacy; not lively or brisk; as a dead fire.

18. In a state of spiritual death; void of grace; lying under the power of sin.

19. Impotent; unable to procreate.

20. Decayed in grace.

Thou hast a name that thou livest, and art dead Revelation 3:1.

21. Not proceeding from spiritual life; not producing good works; as, faith without works is dead James 2:17.

22. Proceeding from corrupt nature, not from spiritual life or a gracious principle; as dead works. Hebrews 9:14.

23. In law, cut off from the rights of a citizen:deprived of power of enjoying the rights of property; as one banished or becoming a monk is civilly dead

DEAD language, a language which is no longer spoken or in common use by a people, and known only in writings; as the Hebrew, Greek and Latin.

DEAD rising or rising line, the parts of a ship's floor or bottom throughout her length, where the floor timber is terminated on the lower futtock.

DEAD, noun ded.

1. The dead signifies dead men.

Ye shall not make cuttings for the dead Leviticus 19:28.

2. The state of the dead; or death.

This is John the Baptist; he is risen from the dead Matthew 14:2.

DEAD, noun ded. The time when there is a remarkable stillness or gloom; depth; as in the midst of winter or of night, are familiar expressions.

DEAD, verb intransitive ded. To lose life or force.

DEAD, verb transitive ded. To deprive of life, force or vigor.

DEAD'-DOING, adjective Destructive; killing.

Why 1828?

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scripture references in definitions

— Kat (Brockton, MA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

waste

WASTE, v.t. [G., L.]

1. To diminish by gradual dissipation or loss. Thus disease wastes the patient; sorrows waste the strength and spirits.

2. To cause to be lost; to destroy by scattering or by injury. Thus cattle waste their fodder when fed in the open field.

3. To expend without necessity or use; to destroy wantonly or luxuriously; to squander; to cause to be lost through wantonness or negligence. Careless people waste their fuel, their food or their property. Children waster their inheritance.

And wasted his substance with riotous living. Luke 15.

4. To destroy in enmity; to desolate; as, to waste an enemys country.

5. To suffer to be lost unnecessarily; or to throw away; as, to waste the blood and treasure of a nation.

6. To destroy by violence.

The Tyber insults our walls, and wastes our fruitful grounds.

7. To impair strength gradually.

Now wasting years my former strength confounds.

8. To lose in idleness or misery; to wear out.

Here condemnd to waste eternal days in woe and pain.

9. To spend; to consume.

O were I able to waste it all myself, and leave you none.

10. In law, to damage, impair or injure, as an estate, voluntarily, or by suffering the buildings, fences, &c. To go to decay. See the Noun.

11. To exhaust; to be consumed by time or mortality.

Till your carcasses be wasted in the wilderness. Numbers 14.

12. To scatter and lose for want of use or of occupiers.

Full many a flowr is born to blush unseen, and waste its sweetness on the desert air.

WASTE, v.i.

1. To dwindle; to be diminished; to lose bulk or substance gradually; as, the body wastes in sickness.

The barrel of meal shall not waste. 1 Kings 17.

2. To be diminished or lost by slow dissipation, consumption or evaporation; as, water wastes by evaporation; fuel wastes in combustion.

3. To be consumed by time or mortality.

Gut man dieth, and wasteth away. Job 14.

WASTE, a.

1. Destroyed; ruined.

The Sophi leaves all waste in his retreat.

2. Desolate; uncultivated; as a waste country; a waste howling wilderness. Deuteronomy 32.

3. Destitute; stripped; as lands laid waste.

4. Superfluous; lost for want of occupiers.

--And strangled with her waste fertility.

5. Worthless; that which is rejected, or used only for mean purposes; as waste wood.

6. That of which no account is taken, or of which no value is found; as waste paper.

7. Uncultivated; untilled; unproductive.

There is yet much waste land in England.

Laid waste, desolated; ruined.

WASTE, n.

1. The act of squandering; the dissipation of property through wantonness, ambition, extravagance, luxury or negligence.

For all this waste of wealth, and loss of blood.

2. Consumption; loss; useless expense; any loss or destruction which is neither necessary nor promotive of a good end; a loss for which there is no equivalent; as a waste of goods or money; a waste of time; a waste of labor; a waste of words.

Little wastes in great establishments, constantly occurring, may defeat the energies of a mighty capital.

3. A desolate or uncultivated country. The plains of Arabia are mostly a wide waste.

4. Land untilled, though capable of tillage; as the wastes in England.

5. Ground, space or place unoccupied; as the etherial waste.

In the dead waste and middle of the night.

6. Region ruined and deserted.

All the leafy nation sinks at last, and Vulcan rides in triumph oer the waste.

7. Mischief; destruction.

He will never, I think, in the way of waste, attempt us again.

8. In law, spoil, destruction or injury done to houses, woods, fences, lands, &c., by a tenant for life or for years, to the prejudice of the heir, or of him in reversion or remainder. Waste is voluntary, as by pulling down buildings; or permissive, as by suffering them to fall for want of necessary repairs. Whatever does a lasting damage to the freehold, is a waste.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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