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Tuesday - December 11, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [day]

Evolution (or devolution) of this word [day]

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DAY, n.

DAY, n. [Sax. dæg, deg, dag; Goth. dags; D. dag; G. tag; Sw. dag; Dan. dag; San. dyu; Celtic di, dia; W. dydh; L. dies. See Dawn.]

  1. That part of the time of the earth's revolution on its axis, in which its surface is presented to the sun; the part of the twenty four hours when it is light; or the space of time between the rising and setting of the sun; called the artificial day. And God called the light day. – Gen i.
  2. The whole time or period of one revolution of the earth on its axis, or twenty four hours; called the natural day. And the evening and the morning were the first day. – Gen. i. In this sense, the day may commence at any period of the revolution. The Babylonians began the day at sun-rising; the Jews, at sun-setting; the Egyptians, at midnight, as do several nations in modern times, the British, French, Spanish, American, &c. This day, in reference to civil transactions, is called the civil day. Thus with us the day when a legal instrument is dated, begins and ends at midnight.
  3. Light; sunshine. Let us walk honestly as in the day. – Rom. xiii.
  4. Time specified; any period of time distinguished from other time; age; time, with reference to the existence of a person or thing. He was a useful man in his day. In the day thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die. – Gen. ii. In this sense, the plural is often used; as, from the days of the judges; in the days of our fathers. In this sense also, the word is often equivalent to life, or earthly existence.
  5. The contest of a day; battle; or day of combat. The day is his own. He won the day, that is, he gained the victory.
  6. An appointed or fixed time. If my debtors do not keep their day. – Dryden.
  7. Time of commemorating an event; anniversary; the same day of the month, in any future year. We celebrate the day of our Savior's birth. Day by day, daily; every day; each day in succession; continually; without intermission of a day. Day by day, we magnify thee. – Common Prayer. But or only from day to day, without certainty of continuance; temporarily. – Shak. To-day, adv. [Sax. to-dæg.] On the present day; this day; or at the present time. Days of grace, in theology, the time when mercy is offered to sinners. To-day, if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts. – Ps. xcv. Days of grace, in law, are days granted by the court for delay, at the prayer of the plaintif or defendant. – Encyc. Three days, beyond the day named in the writ, in which the person summoned may appear and answer. – Blackstone. Days of grace, in commerce, a customary number of days, in Great Britain and America, three, allowed for the payment of a note or bill of exchange, after it becomes due. A note due on the seventh of the month is payable on the tenth. The days of grace are different in different countries. In France they are ten; at Naples eight; at Venice, Amsterdam and Antwerp, six; at Hamburg, twelve; in Spain, fourteen; in Genoa, thirty. – Encyc. Day in court, is a day for the appearance of parties in a suit. Days in bank, in England, days of appearance in the court of common bench. Days in court are generally at the distance of about a week from each other, and have reference to some festival of the church. On some one of these days in bank, all original writs must be made returnable. – Blackstone.

Day
  1. The time of light, or interval between one night and the next; the time between sunrise and sunset, or from dawn to darkness; hence, the light; sunshine.
  2. The period of the earth's revolution on its axis. -- ordinarily divided into twenty-four hours. It is measured by the interval between two successive transits of a celestial body over the same meridian, and takes a specific name from that of the body. Thus, if this is the sun, the day (the interval between two successive transits of the sun's center over the same meridian) is called a solar day; if it is a star, a sidereal day; if it is the moon, a lunar day. See Civil day, Sidereal day, below.
  3. Those hours, or the daily recurring period, allotted by usage or law for work.
  4. A specified time or period; time, considered with reference to the existence or prominence of a person or thing; age; time.

    A man who was great among the Hellenes of his day. Jowett (Thucyd. )

    If my debtors do not keep their day, . . .
    I must with patience all the terms attend.
    Dryden.

  5. (Preceded by the) Some day in particular, as some day of contest, some anniversary, etc.

    The field of Agincourt,
    Fought on the day of Crispin Crispianus.
    Shak.

    His name struck fear, his conduct won the day. Roscommon.

    * Day is much used in self-explaining compounds; as, daybreak, daylight, workday, etc.

    Anniversary day. See Anniversary, n. -- Astronomical day, a period equal to the mean solar day, but beginning at noon instead of at midnight, its twenty-four hours being numbered from 1 to 24; also, the sidereal day, as that most used by astronomers. -- Born days. See under Born. -- Canicular days. See Dog day. -- Civil day, the mean solar day, used in the ordinary reckoning of time, and among most modern nations beginning at mean midnight; its hours are usually numbered in two series, each from 1 to 12. This is the period recognized by courts as constituting a day. The Babylonians and Hindoos began their day at sunrise, the Athenians and Jews at sunset, the ancient Egyptians and Romans at midnight. -- Day blindness. (Med.) See Nyctalopia. -- Day by day, or Day after day, daily; every day; continually; without intermission of a day. See under By. "Day by day we magnify thee." Book of Common Prayer. -- Days in bank (Eng. Law), certain stated days for the return of writs and the appearance of parties; -- so called because originally peculiar to the Court of Common Bench, or Bench (bank) as it was formerly termed. Burrill. - - Day in court, a day for the appearance of parties in a suit. -- Days of devotion (R. C. Ch.), certain festivals on which devotion leads the faithful to attend mass. Shipley. -- Days of grace. See Grace. -- Days of obligation (R. C. Ch.), festival days when it is obligatory on the faithful to attend Mass. Shipley. -- Day owl, (Zoöl.), an owl that flies by day. See Hawk owl. -- Day rule (Eng. Law), an order of court (now abolished) allowing a prisoner, under certain circumstances, to go beyond the prison limits for a single day. -- Day school, one which the pupils attend only in daytime, in distinction from a boarding school. -- Day sight. (Med.) See Hemeralopia. -- Day's work (Naut.), the account or reckoning of a ship's course for twenty-four hours, from noon to noon. -- From day to day, as time passes; in the course of time; as, he improves from day to day. -- Jewish day, the time between sunset and sunset. -- Mean solar day (Astron.), the mean or average of all the apparent solar days of the year. -- One day, One of these days, at an uncertain time, usually of the future, rarely of the past; sooner or later. "Well, niece, I hope to see you one day fitted with a husband." Shak. -- Only from day to day, without certainty of continuance; temporarily. Bacon. -- Sidereal day, the interval between two successive transits of the first point of Aries over the same meridian. The Sidereal day is 23 h. 56 m. 4.09 s. of mean solar time. -- To win the day, to gain the victory, to be successful. S. Butler. -- Week day, any day of the week except Sunday; a working day. -- Working day. (a) A day when work may be legally done, in distinction from Sundays and legal holidays. (b) The number of hours, determined by law or custom, during which a workman, hired at a stated price per day, must work to be entitled to a day's pay.

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Day

DAY, noun

1. That part of the time of the earth's revolution on its axis, in which its surface is presented to the sun; the part of the twenty four hours when it is light; or the space of time between the rising and setting of the sun; called the artificial day

And God called the light day Gen. I.

In this sense, the day may commence at any period of the revolution. The Babylonians began the day at sun-rising; the Jews, at sun-setting; the Egyptians, at midnight, as do several nations in modern times, the British, French, Spanish, American, etc. This day in reference to civil transactions, is called the civil day Thus with us the day when a legal instrument is dated, begins and ends at midnight.

3. Light; sunshine.

Let us walk honestly as in the day Romans 13:12.

4. Time specified; any period of time distinguished from other time; age; time with reference to the existence of a person or thing.

He was a useful man in his day

In the day thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely

die. Genesis 2:2.

In this sense, the plural is often used; as, from the days of the judges; in the days of our fathers. In this sense also, the word is often equivalent to life, or earthly existence.

5. The contest of a day; battle; or day of combat.

The day is his own.

He won the day that is, he gained the victory.

6. An appointed or fixed time.

If my debtors do not keep their day Dryden.

7. Time of commemorating an event; anniversary; the same day of the month, in any future year. We celebrate the day of our Savior's birth.

DAY by day daily; every day; each day in succession; continually; without intermission of a day

DAY by day we magnify thee. Common Prayer.

But or only from day to day without certainty of continuance; temporarily.

To-day, adverb On the present day; this day; or at the present time.

DAYs of grace, in theology, the time when mercy is offered to sinners.

To-day, if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts. Psalms 95:7.

DAYs of grace, in law, are days granted by the court for delay, at the prayer of the plaintiff or defendant.

Three days, beyond the day named in the writ, in which the person summoned may appear and answer.

DAYs of grace, in commerce, a customary number of days, in Great Britain and America, three, allowed for the payment of a note or bill of exchange, after it becomes due. A note due on the seventh of the month is payable on the tenth.

The days of grace are different in different countries. In France, they are ten; at Naples, Eight; at Venice, Amsterdam and Antwerp, six; at Hamburg, Twelve; in Spain, fourteen; in Genoa, thirty.

DAYs in bank, in England, days of appearance in the court of common bench.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

session

SES'SION, n. [L. sessio, from sedeo. See Set.]

1. A sitting or being placed; as the ascension of Christ and his session at the right hand of God.

2. The actual sitting of a court, council, legislature, &c.; or the actual assembly of the members of these o rany similar body for the transaction of business. Thus we say, the court is now in session, meaning that the members are assembled for business.

3. The time, space or term during which a court, council, legislature and the like, meet for daily business; or the space of time between the first meeting and the prorogation of adjournment. Thus a session of parliament is opened with a speech from the throne, and closed by prorogation. The session of a judicial court is called a term. Thus a court may have two sessions or four sessions annually. The supreme court of the United States has one anual session. The legislatures of most of the states have one anualsession only; some have more. The congress of the United States has one only.

4. Sessions, in some of the states, is particularly used for a court of justices, held for granting licenses to innkeepers or taverners, for laying out new highways or altering old ones and the like.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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