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Tuesday - December 18, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [dare]

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dare

DARE, v.i. pret. durst. To have courage to any purpose; to have strength of mind or hardihood to undertake anything; to be bold enough; not to be afraid; to venture; to be adventurous.

I dare do all that may become a man. Shak.

Dare any of you go to law before the unjust? 1
Cor. vi

None of his disciples durst ask him, who art thou.
John xxi

In this intransitive sense, dare is not generally followed by the sign to before another verb in the infinitive; though to may be used with propriety. In German, the verb is numbered among the auxiliaries. In the transitive form, it is regular; thus,

DARE, v.t. pret. and pp. dared. To challenge; to provoke; to defy; as, to dare a man to fight.

Time, I dare thee to discover such a youth and
such a lover. Dryden.

To dare larks, to catch them by means of a looking glass, or by keeping a bird of prey hovering aloft, which keeps them in amaze till caught; to terrify or amaze.

DARE, Defiance; challenge.

DARE, n. A small fish, the same as the dace.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [dare]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

DARE, v.i. pret. durst. To have courage to any purpose; to have strength of mind or hardihood to undertake anything; to be bold enough; not to be afraid; to venture; to be adventurous.

I dare do all that may become a man. Shak.

Dare any of you go to law before the unjust? 1
Cor. vi

None of his disciples durst ask him, who art thou.
John xxi

In this intransitive sense, dare is not generally followed by the sign to before another verb in the infinitive; though to may be used with propriety. In German, the verb is numbered among the auxiliaries. In the transitive form, it is regular; thus,

DARE, v.t. pret. and pp. dared. To challenge; to provoke; to defy; as, to dare a man to fight.

Time, I dare thee to discover such a youth and
such a lover. Dryden.

To dare larks, to catch them by means of a looking glass, or by keeping a bird of prey hovering aloft, which keeps them in amaze till caught; to terrify or amaze.

DARE, Defiance; challenge.

DARE, n. A small fish, the same as the dace.


DARE, n.1

Defiance; challenge. [Not used.] – Shak.


DARE, n.2

A small fish, the same as the dace. – Encyc. Johnson.


DARE, v.i. [pret. durst. Sax. dearran, durran; D. darren, durven; G. dürfen; Sw. dierf, bold; dierfvas, to dare, and töras, to dare; Dan. tör, to dare, and tör, dry, torrid; L. torreo; Dan. törhed, dryness, barrenness; törstig, thirsty. The German dürfen, compounded, bedürfen, signifies to want, to need, to lack, and this in Dutch is derven. The Sw. dåre, rash, mad, sottish, dåra, to infatuate, Dan. daarer, may be of the same family. The Gr. θαρῤεω, and Russ. derzayu, to dare, are evidently the same word. ذَأَرَ dhaura, to be bold, audacious; to be angry, or averse; to be terrified, to flee. So in Sw. darra, to tremble. The sense of boldness, daring, is sometimes from the sense of advancing; but some of the senses of these words indicate the sense of receding.]

To have courage for any purpose; to have strength of mind or hardihood to undertake any thing; to be bold enough; not to be afraid; to venture; to be adventurous. I dare do all that may become a man. – Shak. Dare any of you go to law before the unjust? – 1 Cor. vi. None of his disciples durst ask him, who are thou. – John xxi. In this intransitive sense, dare is not generally followed by the sign to before another verb in the infinitive; though to may be used with propriety. In German, the verb is numbered among the auxiliaries. In the transitive form, it is regular: thus,


DARE, v.t. [pret. and pp. dared.]

To challenge; to provoke; to defy; as, to dare a man to fight. Time, I dare thee to discover. Such a youth, and such a lover. – Dryden. To dare larks, to catch them by means of a looking-glass, or by keeping a bird of prey hovering aloft, which keeps them in amaze till caught; to terrify or amaze. – Johnson. Dryden.


Dare
  1. To have adequate or sufficient courage for any purpose; to be bold or venturesome; not to be afraid; to venture.

    I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more is none. Shak.

    Why then did not the ministers use their new law? Bacause they durst not, because they could not. Macaulay.

    Who dared to sully her sweet love with suspicion. Thackeray.

    The tie of party was stronger than the tie of blood, because a partisan was more ready to dare without asking why. Jowett (Thu(?)yd.).

    * The present tense, I dare, is really an old past tense, so that the third person is he dare, but the form he dares is now often used, and will probably displace the obsolescent he dare, through grammatically as incorrect as he shalls or he cans. Skeat.

    The pore dar plede (the poor man dare plead). P. Plowman.

    You know one dare not discover you. Dryden.

    The fellow dares not deceive me. Shak.

    Here boldly spread thy hands, no venom'd weed
    Dares blister them, no slimy snail dare creep.
    Beau. *** Fl.

    &fist] Formerly durst was also used as the present. Sometimes the old form dare is found for durst or dared.

  2. To have courage for] to attempt courageously; to venture to do or to undertake.

    What high concentration of steady feeling makes men dare every thing and do anything? Bagehot.

    To wrest it from barbarism, to dare its solitudes. The Century.

  3. The quality of daring; venturesomeness; boldness; dash.

    [R.]

    It lends a luster . . .
    A large dare to our great enterprise.
    Shak.

  4. To lurk; to lie hid.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.
  5. To terrify; to daunt.

    [Obs.]

    For I have done those follies, those mad mischiefs,
    Would dare a woman.
    Beau. *** Fl.

    To dare larks, to catch them by producing terror through to use of mirrors, scarlet cloth, a hawk, etc., so that they lie still till a net is thrown over them. Nares.

  6. A small fish; the dace.
  7. To challenge; to provoke; to defy.

    Time, I dare thee to discover
    Such a youth and such a lover.
    Dryden.

  8. Defiance; challenge.

    Childish, unworthy dares
    Are not enought to part our powers.
    Chapman.

    Sextus Pompeius
    Hath given the dare to Cæsar.
    Shak.

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Dare

DARE, verb intransitive preterit tense durst. To have courage to any purpose; to have strength of mind or hardihood to undertake anything; to be bold enough; not to be afraid; to venture; to be adventurous.

I dare do all that may become a man. Shak.

DARE any of you go to law before the unjust? 1

Cor. vi

None of his disciples durst ask him, who art thou.

John 21:1

In this intransitive sense, dare is not generally followed by the sign to before another verb in the infinitive; though to may be used with propriety. In German, the verb is numbered among the auxiliaries. In the transitive form, it is regular; thus,

DARE, verb transitive preterit tense and participle passive dared. To challenge; to provoke; to defy; as, to dare a man to fight.

Time, I dare thee to discover such a youth and

such a lover. Dryden.

To dare larks, to catch them by means of a looking glass, or by keeping a bird of prey hovering aloft, which keeps them in amaze till caught; to terrify or amaze.

DARE, Defiance; challenge.

DARE, noun A small fish, the same as the dace.

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— Floyd (Temecula, CA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

rescript

RE'SCRIPT, n. [L. rescriptum, rescribo.] The answer of an emperor, when consulted by particular persons on some difficult question. This answer serves as a decision of the question, and is therefore equivalent to an edict or decree.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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