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Sunday - December 16, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [dance]

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dance

D'ANCE, v.i.

1. Primarily, to leap or spring; hence, to leap or move with measured steps, regulated by a tune, sung or played on a musical instrument; to leap or step with graceful motions of the body, corresponding with the sound of the voice or an instrument.

There is a time to mourn, and a time to dance.
Eccles. iii

2. To leap and frisk about; to move nimbly or up and down.

To dance attendance, to wait with obsequiousness; to strive to please and gain favor by assiduous attentions and officious civilities; as, to dance attendance at court.

D'ANCE, v.t. To make to dance; to move up and down, or back and forth; to dandle; as, to dance a child on the knee.

D'ANCE, n.

1. In general sense, a leaping and frisking about. Appropriately, a leaping or stepping with motions of the body adjusted to the measure of a tune, particularly by two or more in concert. A lively brisk exercise or amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figure, and by the sound of instruments, in measure.

2. A tune by which dancing is regulated, as the minuet, the waltz, the cotillon, &c.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [dance]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

D'ANCE, v.i.

1. Primarily, to leap or spring; hence, to leap or move with measured steps, regulated by a tune, sung or played on a musical instrument; to leap or step with graceful motions of the body, corresponding with the sound of the voice or an instrument.

There is a time to mourn, and a time to dance.
Eccles. iii

2. To leap and frisk about; to move nimbly or up and down.

To dance attendance, to wait with obsequiousness; to strive to please and gain favor by assiduous attentions and officious civilities; as, to dance attendance at court.

D'ANCE, v.t. To make to dance; to move up and down, or back and forth; to dandle; as, to dance a child on the knee.

D'ANCE, n.

1. In general sense, a leaping and frisking about. Appropriately, a leaping or stepping with motions of the body adjusted to the measure of a tune, particularly by two or more in concert. A lively brisk exercise or amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figure, and by the sound of instruments, in measure.

2. A tune by which dancing is regulated, as the minuet, the waltz, the cotillon, &c.

DANCE, n.

  1. In a general sense, a leaping and frisking about. Appropriately, a leaping or stepping with motions of the body adjusted to the measure of a tune, particularly by two or more in concert. A lively brisk exercise or amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figure, and by the sound of instruments, in measure.
  2. A tune by which dancing is regulated, as the minuet, the waltz, the cotillon, &c.

DANCE, v.i. [Fr. danser; Sp. danzar; Port. dançar; Arm. dançzal; It. danzare; G. tanzen; Sw. dansa; Dan. dandser; D. danssen; Basque danzta; Russ. tantzyu. Qu. the radical letters, and the Oriental דןץ, with a casual n.]

  1. Primarily, to leap or spring; hence, to leap or move with measured steps, regulated by a tune, sung or played on a musical instrument; to leap or step with graceful motions of the body, corresponding with the sound of the voice or of an instrument. There is a time to mourn, and a time to dance. Eccles. iii.
  2. To leap and frisk about; to move nimbly or up and down. To dance attendance, to wait with obsequiousness; to strive to please and gain favor by assiduous attentions and officious civilities; as, to dance attendance at court.

DANCE, v.t.

To make to dance; to move up and down, or back and forth; to dandle; as, to dance a child on the knee. Bacon.


Dance
  1. To move with measured steps, or to a musical accompaniment; to go through, either alone or in company with others, with a regulated succession of movements, (commonly) to the sound of music; to trip or leap rhythmically.

    Jack shall pipe and Gill shall dance. Wither.

    Good shepherd, what fair swain is this
    Which dances with your daughter?
    Shak.

  2. To cause to dance, or move nimbly or merrily about, or up and down; to dandle.

    To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind. Shak.

    Thy grandsire loved thee well;
    Many a time he danced thee on his knee.
    Shak.

    To dance attendance, to come and go obsequiously; to be or remain in waiting, at the beck and call of another, with a view to please or gain favor.

    A man of his place, and so near our favor,
    To dance attendance on their lordships' pleasure.
    Shak.

  3. The leaping, tripping, or measured stepping of one who dances; an amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figures and in accord with music.
  4. To move nimbly or merrily; to express pleasure by motion; to caper; to frisk; to skip about.

    Then, 'tis time to dance off. Thackeray.

    More dances my rapt heart
    Than when I first my wedded mistress saw.
    Shak.

    Shadows in the glassy waters dance. Byron.

    Where rivulets dance their wayward round. Wordsworth.

    To dance on a rope, or To dance on nothing, to be hanged.

  5. A tune by which dancing is regulated, as the minuet, the waltz, the cotillon, etc.

    * The word dance was used ironically, by the older writers, of many proceedings besides dancing.

    Of remedies of love she knew parchance
    For of that art she couth the olde dance.
    Chaucer.

    Dance of Death (Art), an allegorical representation of the power of death over all, -- the old, the young, the high, and the low, being led by a dancing skeleton. -- Morris dance. See Morris. -- To lead one a dance, to cause one to go through a series of movements or experiences as if guided by a partner in a dance not understood.

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Dance

D'ANCE, verb intransitive

1. Primarily, to leap or spring; hence, to leap or move with measured steps, regulated by a tune, sung or played on a musical instrument; to leap or step with graceful motions of the body, corresponding with the sound of the voice or an instrument.

There is a time to mourn, and a time to dance

Ecclesiastes 3:4

2. To leap and frisk about; to move nimbly or up and down.

To dance attendance, to wait with obsequiousness; to strive to please and gain favor by assiduous attentions and officious civilities; as, to dance attendance at court.

D'ANCE, verb transitive To make to dance; to move up and down, or back and forth; to dandle; as, to dance a child on the knee.

D'ANCE, noun

1. In general sense, a leaping and frisking about. Appropriately, a leaping or stepping with motions of the body adjusted to the measure of a tune, particularly by two or more in concert. A lively brisk exercise or amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figure, and by the sound of instruments, in measure.

2. A tune by which dancing is regulated, as the minuet, the waltz, the cotillon, etc.

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spiritual word definitons

— Tom (Klamath Falls, OR)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

drain

DRAIN, v.t.

1. To filter; to cause to pass through some porous substance.

Salt water, drained through twenty vessels of earth, hath become fresh.

2. To empty or clear of liquor, by causing the liquor to drop or run off slowly; as, to drain a vessel or its contents.

3. To make dry; to exhaust of water or other liquor, by causing it to flow off in channels, or through porous substances; as, to drain land; to drain a swamp or marsh.

4. To empty; to exhaust; to draw off gradually; as, a foreign war drains a country of specie.

DRAIN, v.i.

1. To flow off gradually; as, let the water of low ground drain off.

2. To be emptied of liquor, by flowing or dropping; as, let the vessel stand and drain; let the cloth hand and drain.

DRAIN, n. A channel through which water or other liquid flows off; particularly, a trench or ditch to convey water from wet land; a watercourse; a sewer; a sink.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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