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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [crystal]

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crystal

CRYSTAL, n. [L. Gr., frost.]

1. In chemistry and mineralogy, an inorganic body, which, by the operation of affinity, has assumed the form of a regular solid, terminated by a certain number of plane and smooth surfaces.

2. A factitious body, cast in glass houses, called crystal glass; a species of glass, more perfect in its composition and manufacture, than common glass. The best kind is the Venice crystal. It is called also factitious crystal or paste.

3. A substance of any kind having the form of a crystal.

4. The glass of a watch-case.

Rock crystal, or mountain crystal, a general name for all the transparent crystals of quartz, particularly of limpid or colorless quartz.

Iceland crystal, a variety of calcarious spar, or crystalized carbonate of lime, brought from Iceland. It occurs in laminated masses, easily divisible into rhombs, and is remarkable for its double refraction.

CRYSTAL, a. Consisting of crystal, or like crystal; clear; transparent; lucid; pellucid.

By crystal streams that murmur thorough the meads.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [crystal]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

CRYSTAL, n. [L. Gr., frost.]

1. In chemistry and mineralogy, an inorganic body, which, by the operation of affinity, has assumed the form of a regular solid, terminated by a certain number of plane and smooth surfaces.

2. A factitious body, cast in glass houses, called crystal glass; a species of glass, more perfect in its composition and manufacture, than common glass. The best kind is the Venice crystal. It is called also factitious crystal or paste.

3. A substance of any kind having the form of a crystal.

4. The glass of a watch-case.

Rock crystal, or mountain crystal, a general name for all the transparent crystals of quartz, particularly of limpid or colorless quartz.

Iceland crystal, a variety of calcarious spar, or crystalized carbonate of lime, brought from Iceland. It occurs in laminated masses, easily divisible into rhombs, and is remarkable for its double refraction.

CRYSTAL, a. Consisting of crystal, or like crystal; clear; transparent; lucid; pellucid.

By crystal streams that murmur thorough the meads.

CRYS'TAL, a.

Consisting of crystal, or like crystal; clear; transparent; lucid; pellucid. By crystal streams that murmur through the meads. – Dryden.


CRYS'TAL, n. [L. crystallus; Gr. κρυσταλλος; Fr. cristal; Sp. cristal; It. cristallo; D. kristal; G. krystall; W. crisial, from cris, it is said, a hard crust. It is from the same root as crisp, and W. cresu, to parch, crest, a crust, crasu, to roast. The Greek, from which we have the word, is composed of the root of κρυος, frost, a contracted word, probably from the root of the Welsh words, supra, and στελλω, to set. The primary sense of the Welsh words is to shrink, draw, contract; a sense equally applicable to the effects of heat and cold. Qu. Ar. قَرَسَ karasa, Ch. קרש kerash, to congeal. Class Rd, No. 83, 85.]

  1. In chimistry and mineralogy, an inorganic body, which, by the operation of affinity, has assumed the form of a regular solid, terminated by a certain number of plane and smooth surfaces. Cleaveland.
  2. A factitious body, cast in glass-houses, called crystal glass; a species of glass, more perfect in its composition and manufacture, than common glass. The best kind is the Venice crystal. It is called also factitious crystal or paste. – Encyc. Nicholson.
  3. A substance of any kind having the form of a crystal.
  4. The glass of a watch-case. Rock crystal, or mountain crystal, a general name for all the transparent crystals of quartz, particularly of limpid or colorless quartz. Iceland crystal, a variety of calcarious spar, or crystalized carbonate of lime, brought from Iceland. It occurs in laminated masses, easily divisible into rhombs, and is remarkable for its double refraction. – Cleaveland.

Crys"tal
  1. The regular form which a substance tends to assume in solidifying, through the inherent power of cohesive attraction. It is bounded by plane surfaces, symmetrically arranged, and each species of crystal has fixed axial ratios. See Crystallization.
  2. Consisting of, or like, crystal; clear; transparent; lucid; pellucid; crystalline.

    Through crystal walls each little mote will peep.
    Shak.

    By crystal streams that murmur through the meads.
    Dryden.

    The crystal pellets at the touch congeal,
    And from the ground rebounds the ratting hail.
    H. Brooks.

  3. The material of quartz, in crystallization transparent or nearly so, and either colorless or slightly tinged with gray, or the like] -- called also rock crystal. Ornamental vessels are made of it. Cf. Smoky quartz, Pebble; also Brazilian pebble, under Brazilian.
  4. A species of glass, more perfect in its composition and manufacture than common glass, and often cut into ornamental forms. See Flint glass.
  5. The glass over the dial of a watch case.
  6. Anything resembling crystal, as clear water, etc.

    The blue crystal of the seas.
    Byron.

    Blood crystal. See under Blood. -- Compound crystal. See under Compound. -- Iceland crystal, a transparent variety of calcite, or crystallized calcium carbonate, brought from Iceland, and used in certain optical instruments, as the polariscope. -- Rock crystal, or Mountain crystal, any transparent crystal of quartz, particularly of limpid or colorless quartz.

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Crystal

CRYSTAL, noun [Latin Gr., frost.]

1. In chemistry and mineralogy, an inorganic body, which, by the operation of affinity, has assumed the form of a regular solid, terminated by a certain number of plane and smooth surfaces.

2. A factitious body, cast in glass houses, called crystal glass; a species of glass, more perfect in its composition and manufacture, than common glass. The best kind is the Venice crystal It is called also factitious crystal or paste.

3. A substance of any kind having the form of a crystal

4. The glass of a watch-case.

Rock crystal or mountain crystal a general name for all the transparent crystals of quartz, particularly of limpid or colorless quartz.

Iceland crystal a variety of calcarious spar, or crystalized carbonate of lime, brought from Iceland. It occurs in laminated masses, easily divisible into rhombs, and is remarkable for its double refraction.

CRYSTAL, adjective Consisting of crystal or like crystal; clear; transparent; lucid; pellucid.

By crystal streams that murmur thorough the meads.

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Now that I am aware of the KJV and how that is the only translation worthy of my time, this dictionary I found out is going to help me to get to the true meaning of the words.

— Rick (Long Beach, CA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

impertinency

IMPER'TINENCY, n. [L. impertinens; in and pertinens, pertineo, to pertain; per and teneo, to hold.]

1. That which is not pertinent; that which does not belong to the subject in hand; that which is of no weight.

2. The state of not being pertinent.

3. Folly; rambling thought. [Little used.]

4. Rudeness; improper intrusion; interference by word or conduct which is not consistent with the age or station of the person. [This is the most usual sense.]

We should avoid the vexation and impertinence of pedants.

5. A trifle, a thing of little or no value.

There are many subtile impertinencies learnt in schools-

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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