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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [course]

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course

COURSE, n.

1. In its general sense, a passing; a moving, or motion forward, in a direct or curving line; applicable to any body or substance, solid or fluid.

Applied to animals, a running, or walking; a race; a career; a passing, or passage, with any degree of swiftness indefinitely.

Applied to fluids, a flowing, as in a stream in any direction; as a straight course, or winding course. It is applied to water or other liquids, to air or wind, and to light, in the sense of motion or passing.

Applied to solid bodies, it signifies motion or passing; as the course of a rolling stone; the course of a carriage; the course of the earth in its orbit.

Applied to navigation, it signifies a passing or motion on water, or in balloons in air; a voyage.

2. The direction of motion; line of advancing; point of compass, in which motion is directed; as, what course shall the pilot steer? In technical language, the angel contained between the nearest meridian and that point of compass on which a ship sails in any direction.

3. Ground on which a race is run.

4. A passing or process; the progress of any thing; as the course of an argument, or of a debate; a course of thought or reflexion.

5. Order of proceeding or of passing from an ancestor to an heir; as the course of descent in inheritance.

6. Order; turn; class; succession of one to another in office, or duty.

The chief fathers of every course. 1 Chronicles 27.

Solomon appointed the courses of the priests. 2 Chronicles 8.

7. Stated and orderly method of proceeding; usual manner. He obtained redress in due course of law. Leave nature to her course.

8. Series of successive and methodical procedure; a train of acts, or applications; as a course of medicine administered.

9. A methodical series, applied to the arts or sciences; a systemized order of principles in arts or sciences, for illustration of instruction. We say, the author has completed a course of principles or of lectures in philosophy. Also, the order pursued by a student; as, he has completed a course of studies in law or physics.

10. Manner of proceeding; way of life or conduct; deportment; series of actions.

That I might finish my course with joy. Acts 20.

Their course is evil. Jeremiah 23.

11. Line of conduct; manner of proceeding; as, we know not what course to pursue.

12. Natural bent; propensity; uncontrolled will. Let not a perverse child take his own course.

13. Tilt; act of running in the lists.

14. Orderly structure; system.

The tongue setteth on fire the course of nature. James 3.

15. Any regular series. In architecture, a continued range of stones, level or of the same highth, throughout the whole length of the building, and not interrupted by any aperture. A laying of bricks, &c.

16. The dishes set on table at one time; service of meat.

17. Regularity; order; regular succession; as, let the classes follow in course.

18. Empty form; as, compliments are often words of course.

Of course, by consequence; in regular or natural order; in the common manner of proceeding; without specila direction or provision. This effect will follow of course. If the defendant resides no in the state, the cause is continued of course.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [course]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

COURSE, n.

1. In its general sense, a passing; a moving, or motion forward, in a direct or curving line; applicable to any body or substance, solid or fluid.

Applied to animals, a running, or walking; a race; a career; a passing, or passage, with any degree of swiftness indefinitely.

Applied to fluids, a flowing, as in a stream in any direction; as a straight course, or winding course. It is applied to water or other liquids, to air or wind, and to light, in the sense of motion or passing.

Applied to solid bodies, it signifies motion or passing; as the course of a rolling stone; the course of a carriage; the course of the earth in its orbit.

Applied to navigation, it signifies a passing or motion on water, or in balloons in air; a voyage.

2. The direction of motion; line of advancing; point of compass, in which motion is directed; as, what course shall the pilot steer? In technical language, the angel contained between the nearest meridian and that point of compass on which a ship sails in any direction.

3. Ground on which a race is run.

4. A passing or process; the progress of any thing; as the course of an argument, or of a debate; a course of thought or reflexion.

5. Order of proceeding or of passing from an ancestor to an heir; as the course of descent in inheritance.

6. Order; turn; class; succession of one to another in office, or duty.

The chief fathers of every course. 1 Chronicles 27.

Solomon appointed the courses of the priests. 2 Chronicles 8.

7. Stated and orderly method of proceeding; usual manner. He obtained redress in due course of law. Leave nature to her course.

8. Series of successive and methodical procedure; a train of acts, or applications; as a course of medicine administered.

9. A methodical series, applied to the arts or sciences; a systemized order of principles in arts or sciences, for illustration of instruction. We say, the author has completed a course of principles or of lectures in philosophy. Also, the order pursued by a student; as, he has completed a course of studies in law or physics.

10. Manner of proceeding; way of life or conduct; deportment; series of actions.

That I might finish my course with joy. Acts 20.

Their course is evil. Jeremiah 23.

11. Line of conduct; manner of proceeding; as, we know not what course to pursue.

12. Natural bent; propensity; uncontrolled will. Let not a perverse child take his own course.

13. Tilt; act of running in the lists.

14. Orderly structure; system.

The tongue setteth on fire the course of nature. James 3.

15. Any regular series. In architecture, a continued range of stones, level or of the same highth, throughout the whole length of the building, and not interrupted by any aperture. A laying of bricks, &c.

16. The dishes set on table at one time; service of meat.

17. Regularity; order; regular succession; as, let the classes follow in course.

18. Empty form; as, compliments are often words of course.

Of course, by consequence; in regular or natural order; in the common manner of proceeding; without specila direction or provision. This effect will follow of course. If the defendant resides no in the state, the cause is continued of course.

COURSE, n. [Fr. course; Sp. curso; It. corso; Ir. cursa; from L. cursus, from curro, to run, W. gyru, Eng. hurry. See Class Gr, No. 7, 15, 32, 34.]

  1. In its general sense, a passing; a moving, or motion forward, in a direct or curving line; applicable to any body or distance, solid or fluid. Applied to animals, a running, or walking; a race; a career; a passing, or passage, with any degree of swiftness indefinitely. Applied to fluids, a flowing, as in a stream in any direction; as, a straight course, or winding course. It is applied to water or other liquids, to air or wind, and to light, in the sense of motion or passing. Applied to solid bodies, it signifies motion or passing; as, the course of a rolling stone; the course of a carriage; the course of the earth in its orbit. Applied to navigation, it signifies a passing or motion on water, or in balloons in air; a voyage.
  2. The direction of motion; line of advancing; point of compass, in which motion is directed; as, what course shall the pilot steer? In technical language, the angle contained between the nearest meridian and that point of compass on which a ship sails in any direction. – Mar. Dict.
  3. Ground on which a race is run.
  4. A passing or process; the progress of any thing; as, the course of an argument, or of a debate; a course of thought of reflection.
  5. Order of proceeding or of passing from an ancestor to an heir; as, the course of descent in inheritance.
  6. Order; turn; class; succession of one to another in office, or duty. The chief fathers of every course. – 1 Chron. xxvii. Solomon appointed the courses of the priests. – 2 Chron. viii.
  7. Stated and orderly method of proceeding; usual manner. He obtained redress in due course of law. Leave nature to her course.
  8. Series of successive and methodical procedure; a train of acts, or applications; as, a course of medicine administered.
  9. A methodical series, applied to the arts or sciences; a systemized order of principles in arts or sciences, for illustration or instruction. We say, the author has completed a course of principles or of lectures in philosophy. Also, the order pursued by a student; as, he has completed a course of studies in law or physics.
  10. Manner of proceeding; way of life or conduct; deportment; series of actions. That I might finish my course with joy. – Acts xx. Their course is evil. – Jer. xxii.
  11. Line of conduct; manner of proceeding; as, we know not what course to pursue.
  12. Natural bent; propensity; uncontrolled will. Let not a perverse child take his own course.
  13. Tilt; act of running in the lists.
  14. Orderly structure; system. The tongue setteth on fire the course of nature. – James iii.
  15. Any regular series. In architecture, a continued range of stones, level or of the same highth, throughout the whole length of the building, and not interrupted by any aperture. A laying of bricks, &c.
  16. The dishes set on table at one time; service of meat.
  17. Regularity; order; regular succession; as, let the classes follow in course.
  18. Empty form; as, compliments are often words of course. Of course, by consequence; in regular or natural order; in the common manner of proceeding; without special direction or provision. This effect will follow of course. If the defendant resides not in the state, the cause is continued of course.

COURSE, v.i.

To run; to move with speed; to run or move about; as, the blood courses. – Shak. The greyhounds coursed through the fields.


COURSE, v.t.

  1. To hunt; to pursue; to chase. We coursed him at the heels. – Shak.
  2. To cause to run; to force to move with speed. – May.
  3. To run through or over. The blood courses the winding arteries. The bounding steed courses the dusty plain.

Course
  1. The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage.

    And when we had finished our course from Tyre, we came to Ptolemais.
    Acts xxi. 7.

  2. To run, hunt, or chase after] to follow hard upon; to pursue.

    We coursed him at the heels.
    Shak.

  3. To run as in a race, or in hunting; to pursue the sport of coursing; as, the sportsmen coursed over the flats of Lancashire.
  4. The ground or path traversed; track; way.

    The same horse also run the round course at Newmarket.
    Pennant.

  5. To cause to chase after or pursue game; as, to course greyhounds after deer.
  6. To move with speed; to race; as, the blood courses through the veins.

    Shak.
  7. Motion, considered as to its general or resultant direction or to its goal; line progress or advance.

    A light by which the Argive squadron steers
    Their silent course to Ilium's well known shore.
    Dennham.

    Westward the course of empire takes its way.
    Berkeley.

  8. To run through or over.

    The bounding steed courses the dusty plain.
    Pope.

  9. Progress from point to point without change of direction; any part of a progress from one place to another, which is in a straight line, or on one direction; as, a ship in a long voyage makes many courses; a course measured by a surveyor between two stations; also, a progress without interruption or rest; a heat; as, one course of a race.
  10. Motion considered with reference to manner; or derly progress; procedure in a certain line of thought or action; as, the course of an argument.

    The course of true love never did run smooth.
    Shak.

  11. Customary or established sequence of events; recurrence of events according to natural laws.

    By course of nature and of law.
    Davies.

    Day and night,
    Seedtime and harvest, heat and hoary frost,
    Shall hold their course.
    Milton.

  12. Method of procedure; manner or way of conducting; conduct; behavior.

    My lord of York commends the plot and the general course of the action.
    Shak.

    By perseverance in the course prescribed.
    Wodsworth.

    You hold your course without remorse.
    Tennyson.

  13. A series of motions or acts arranged in order; a succession of acts or practices connectedly followed; as, a course of medicine; a course of lectures on chemistry.
  14. The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn.

    He appointed . . . the courses of the priests
    2 Chron. viii. 14.

  15. That part of a meal served at one time, with its accompaniments.

    He [Goldsmith] wore fine clothes, gave dinners of several courses, paid court to venal beauties.
    Macaulay.

  16. A continuous level range of brick or stones of the same height throughout the face or faces of a building.

    Gwilt.
  17. The lowest sail on any mast of a square-rigged vessel; as, the fore course, main course, etc.
  18. The menses.

    In course, in regular succession. - - Of course, by consequence; as a matter of course; in regular or natural order. -- In the course of, at same time or times during. "In the course of human events." T. Jefferson.

    Syn. -- Way; road; route; passage; race; series; succession; manner; method; mode; career; progress.

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Course

COURSE, noun

1. In its general sense, a passing; a moving, or motion forward, in a direct or curving line; applicable to any body or substance, solid or fluid.

Applied to animals, a running, or walking; a race; a career; a passing, or passage, with any degree of swiftness indefinitely.

Applied to fluids, a flowing, as in a stream in any direction; as a straight course or winding course It is applied to water or other liquids, to air or wind, and to light, in the sense of motion or passing.

Applied to solid bodies, it signifies motion or passing; as the course of a rolling stone; the course of a carriage; the course of the earth in its orbit.

Applied to navigation, it signifies a passing or motion on water, or in balloons in air; a voyage.

2. The direction of motion; line of advancing; point of compass, in which motion is directed; as, what course shall the pilot steer? In technical language, the angel contained between the nearest meridian and that point of compass on which a ship sails in any direction.

3. Ground on which a race is run.

4. A passing or process; the progress of any thing; as the course of an argument, or of a debate; a course of thought or reflexion.

5. Order of proceeding or of passing from an ancestor to an heir; as the course of descent in inheritance.

6. Order; turn; class; succession of one to another in office, or duty.

The chief fathers of every course 1 Chronicles 27:1.

Solomon appointed the courses of the priests. 2 Chronicles 8:14.

7. Stated and orderly method of proceeding; usual manner. He obtained redress in due course of law. Leave nature to her course

8. Series of successive and methodical procedure; a train of acts, or applications; as a course of medicine administered.

9. A methodical series, applied to the arts or sciences; a systemized order of principles in arts or sciences, for illustration of instruction. We say, the author has completed a course of principles or of lectures in philosophy. Also, the order pursued by a student; as, he has completed a course of studies in law or physics.

10. Manner of proceeding; way of life or conduct; deportment; series of actions.

That I might finish my course with joy. Acts 20:24.

Their course is evil. Jeremiah 23:10.

11. Line of conduct; manner of proceeding; as, we know not what course to pursue.

12. Natural bent; propensity; uncontrolled will. Let not a perverse child take his own course

13. Tilt; act of running in the lists.

14. Orderly structure; system.

The tongue setteth on fire the course of nature. James 3:6.

15. Any regular series. In architecture, a continued range of stones, level or of the same highth, throughout the whole length of the building, and not interrupted by any aperture. A laying of bricks, etc.

16. The dishes set on table at one time; service of meat.

17. Regularity; order; regular succession; as, let the classes follow in course

18. Empty form; as, compliments are often words of course

Of course by consequence; in regular or natural order; in the common manner of proceeding; without specila direction or provision. This effect will follow of course If the defendant resides no in the state, the cause is continued of course

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It is important to understand the language of the 1800 to know what the great Bible students of that time was saying.

— Hein (Pietermaritzburg, KZN)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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parasitic

PARASIT'IC

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