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Wednesday - December 11, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [comfort]

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comfort

COMFORT, v.t.

1. To strengthen; to invigorate; to cheer or enliven.

Light excelleth in comforting the spirits of men.

Comfort ye your hearts. Gen. 18.

2. To strengthen the mind when depressed or enfeebled; to console; to give new vigor to the spirits; to cheer, or relieve from depression, or trouble.

His friends came to mourn with him and to comfort him. Job. 2.

3. In law, to relieve, assist or encourage, as the accessory to a crime after the fact.

COMFORT, n.

1. Relief from pain; ease; rest or moderate pleasure after pain, cold or distress or uneasiness of body. The word signifies properly new strength, or animation; and relief from pain is often the effect of strength. In a popular sense, the word signifies rather negatively the absence of pain and the consequent quiet, than positive animation.

2. Relief from distress of mind; the ease and quiet which is experienced when pain, trouble, agitation or affliction ceases. It implies also some degree of positive animation of the spirits; or some pleasurable sensations derived from hope, and agreeable prospects; consolation.

Let me alone, that I may take comfort a little. Job 10.

Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole. Matt. 9.

3. Support; consolation under calamity, distress or danger.

Let thy merciful kindness be for my comfort. Ps. 119.

4. That which gives strength or support in distress, difficulty, danger, or infirmity.

Pious children are the comfort of their aged parents.

5. In law, support; assistance; countenance; encouragement; as, an accessory affords aid or comfort to a felon.

6. That which gives security from want and furnishes moderate enjoyment; as the comforts of life.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [comfort]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

COMFORT, v.t.

1. To strengthen; to invigorate; to cheer or enliven.

Light excelleth in comforting the spirits of men.

Comfort ye your hearts. Gen. 18.

2. To strengthen the mind when depressed or enfeebled; to console; to give new vigor to the spirits; to cheer, or relieve from depression, or trouble.

His friends came to mourn with him and to comfort him. Job. 2.

3. In law, to relieve, assist or encourage, as the accessory to a crime after the fact.

COMFORT, n.

1. Relief from pain; ease; rest or moderate pleasure after pain, cold or distress or uneasiness of body. The word signifies properly new strength, or animation; and relief from pain is often the effect of strength. In a popular sense, the word signifies rather negatively the absence of pain and the consequent quiet, than positive animation.

2. Relief from distress of mind; the ease and quiet which is experienced when pain, trouble, agitation or affliction ceases. It implies also some degree of positive animation of the spirits; or some pleasurable sensations derived from hope, and agreeable prospects; consolation.

Let me alone, that I may take comfort a little. Job 10.

Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole. Matt. 9.

3. Support; consolation under calamity, distress or danger.

Let thy merciful kindness be for my comfort. Ps. 119.

4. That which gives strength or support in distress, difficulty, danger, or infirmity.

Pious children are the comfort of their aged parents.

5. In law, support; assistance; countenance; encouragement; as, an accessory affords aid or comfort to a felon.

6. That which gives security from want and furnishes moderate enjoyment; as the comforts of life.

COM'FORT, n.

  1. Relief from pain; ease; rest or moderate pleasure after pain, cold, or distress, or uneasiness of body. The word signifies properly, new strength, or animation; and relief from pain is often the effect of strength. In a popular sense, the word signifies rather negatively, the absence of pain and the consequent quiet, than positive animation.
  2. Relief from distress of mind; the ease and quiet which is experienced when pain, trouble, agitation, or affliction ceases. It implies also some degree of positive animation of the spirits; or some pleasurable sensations derived from hope, and agreeable prospects; consolation. Let me alone, that I may take comfort a little. – Job x. Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole. – Matth. ix.
  3. Support; consolation under calamity, distress, or danger. Let thy merciful kindness be for my comfort. – Ps. cxix.
  4. That which gives strength or support in distress, difficulty, danger, or infirmity; as, pious children are the comfort of their aged parents.
  5. In law, support; assistance; countenance; encouragement; as, an accessory affords aid or comfort to a felon.
  6. That which gives security from want and furnishes moderate enjoyment; as, the comforts of life.

COM'FORT, v.t. [Low L. conforto; Fr. conforter; Arm. conforti, or conforta; It. confortare; Sp. and Port. confortar; Ir. comh-fhurtach, comfort, and furtachd, id.; furtaighim, to relieve or help; from the L. con and fortis, strong.]

  1. To strengthen; to invigorate; to cheer or enliven. Light excelleth in comforting the spirits of men. – Bacon. Comfort ye your hearts. – Gen. xviii.
  2. To strengthen the mind when depressed or enfeebled; to console; to give new vigor to the spirits; to cheer, or relieve from depression, or trouble. His friends came to mourn with him and to comfort him. – Job ii.
  3. In law, to relieve, assist or encourage, as the accessory to a crime after the fact. – Blackstone.

Com"fort
  1. To make strong; to invigorate; to fortify; to corroborate.

    [Obs.] Wyclif.

    God's own testimony . . . doth not a little comfort and confirm the same.
    Hooker.

  2. Assistance; relief; support.

    [Obs. except in the phrase "aid and comfort." See 5 below.] Shak.
  3. To assist or help; to aid.

    [Obs.]

    I . . . can not help the noble chevalier:
    God comfort him in this necessity!
    Shak.

  4. Encouragement; solace; consolation in trouble; also, that which affords consolation.

    In comfort of her mother's fears.
    Shak.

    Cheer thy spirit with this comfort.
    Shak.

    Speaking words of endearment where words of comfort availed not.
    Longfellow.

  5. To impart strength and hope to; to encourage; to relieve; to console; to cheer.

    Light excelleth in comforting the spirits of men.
    Bacon.

    That we may be able to comfort them that are in any affliction.
    2 Cor. i. 4 (Rev. Ver.).

    A perfect woman, nobly planned,
    To warn, to comfort, and command.
    Wordsworth.

    Syn. -- To cheer; solace; console; revive; encourage; enliven; invigorate; inspirit; gladden; recreate; exhilarate; refresh; animate; confirm; strengthen. -- To Comfort, Console, Solace. These verbs all suppose some antecedent state of suffering or sorrow. Console is confined to the act giving sympathetic relief to the mind under affliction or sorrow, and points to some definite source of that relief; as, the presence of his friend consoled him; he was much consoled by this intelligence. The act of consoling commonly implies the inculcation of resignation. Comfort points to relief afforded by the communication of positive pleasure, hope, and strength, as well as by the diminution of pain; as, "They brought the young man alive, and were not a little comforted." Acts xx. 12. Solace is from L. solacium, which means according to Dumesnil, consolation inwardly felt or applied to the case of the sufferer. Hence, the verb to solace denotes the using of things for the purpose of affording relief under sorrow or suffering; as, to solace one's self with reflections, with books, or with active employments.

  6. A state of quiet enjoyment; freedom from pain, want, or anxiety; also, whatever contributes to such a condition.

    I had much joy and comfort in thy love.
    Phil. 7 (Rev. Ver.).

    He had the means of living in comfort.
    Macaulay.

  7. A wadded bedquilt; a comfortable.

    [U. S.]
  8. Unlawful support, countenance, or encouragement; as, to give aid and comfort to the enemy.

    Syn. -- Comfort, Consolation. Comfort has two meanin

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Comfort

COMFORT, verb transitive

1. To strengthen; to invigorate; to cheer or enliven.

Light excelleth in comforting the spirits of men.

COMFORT ye your hearts. Genesis 18:5.

2. To strengthen the mind when depressed or enfeebled; to console; to give new vigor to the spirits; to cheer, or relieve from depression, or trouble.

His friends came to mourn with him and to comfort him. Job 2:11.

3. In law, to relieve, assist or encourage, as the accessory to a crime after the fact.

COMFORT, noun

1. Relief from pain; ease; rest or moderate pleasure after pain, cold or distress or uneasiness of body. The word signifies properly new strength, or animation; and relief from pain is often the effect of strength. In a popular sense, the word signifies rather negatively the absence of pain and the consequent quiet, than positive animation.

2. Relief from distress of mind; the ease and quiet which is experienced when pain, trouble, agitation or affliction ceases. It implies also some degree of positive animation of the spirits; or some pleasurable sensations derived from hope, and agreeable prospects; consolation.

Let me alone, that I may take comfort a little. Job 10:20.

Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath made thee whole. Matthew 9:22.

3. Support; consolation under calamity, distress or danger.

Let thy merciful kindness be for my comfort Psalms 119:50.

4. That which gives strength or support in distress, difficulty, danger, or infirmity.

Pious children are the comfort of their aged parents.

5. In law, support; assistance; countenance; encouragement; as, an accessory affords aid or comfort to a felon.

6. That which gives security from want and furnishes moderate enjoyment; as the comforts of life.

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Because I mostly read Christian books written from that time because those people really had pure hearts for the Lord

— Ray (Durban)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

shadow

SHAD'OW, n.

1. Shade within defined limits; obscurity or deprivation of light, apparent on a plane and represtnting the form of the body which intercepts the rays of light; as the shadow of a man, of a tree or a tower. The shadow of the earth in in an eclipse of the moon is proof of its sphericity.

2. Darkness; shade; obscurity.

Night's sable shadows from the ocean rise. Denham.

3. Shelter made by any thing that intercepts the light, heat or influence of the air.

In secret shadow from the sunny ray,

On a sweet bed of lilies softly laid. Spenser.

4. Obscure place; secluded retreat.

To secret shadows I retire. [Obs.] Dryden.

5. Dark part of a picture. Obs. [In the last two senses, shade is now used.]

6. A spirit; a ghost. Obs. [In this sense, shade is now used.]

7. In painting, the representation of a real shadow.

8. An imperfect and faint representation; opposed to substance.

The law of having a shadow of good things to come. Heb. 10.

9. Inseparable companion.

Sin and her shadow, death. Milton.

10. Type; mystical representaion.

Types and shadows of that destin'd seed. Milton.

11. Protection; shelter; favor.

12. Slight or faint appearance.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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