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Tuesday - January 21, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [cloud]

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cloud

CLOUD, n. [I have not found this word in any other language. The sense is obvious--a collection.]

1. A collection f visible vapor, or watery particles, suspended in the atmosphere, at some altitude. A like collection of vapors near the earth is usually called fog.

I do set my bow in the cloud. Gen. 9.

Behold, a white cloud. Rev. 14.

2. A state of obscurity or darkness.

3. A collection of smoke, or a dense collection of dust, rising or floating in the air; as a cloud of dust.

A cloud of incense. Ezek. 8.

4. The dark or varied colors, in veins or spots, on stones or other bodies, are called clouds.

5. A great multitude; a vast collection.

Seeing we are encompassed with so great a cloud of witnesses. Heb. 12.

CLOUD, v.t. To overspread with a cloud or clouds; as, the sky is clouded; clouds intercept the rays of the sun. Hence,

2. To obscure; to darken; as, to cloud the day, or truth, or reason.

3. To darken in veins or spots; to variegate with colors; as clouded marble.

4. To make of a gloomy aspect; to give the appearance of sullenness.

What sullen fury clouds his scornful brow.

5. To sully; to tarnish.

CLOUD, v.i. To grow cloudy; to become obscure with clouds; sometimes followed by over; as, the sky clouds over.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [cloud]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

CLOUD, n. [I have not found this word in any other language. The sense is obvious--a collection.]

1. A collection f visible vapor, or watery particles, suspended in the atmosphere, at some altitude. A like collection of vapors near the earth is usually called fog.

I do set my bow in the cloud. Gen. 9.

Behold, a white cloud. Rev. 14.

2. A state of obscurity or darkness.

3. A collection of smoke, or a dense collection of dust, rising or floating in the air; as a cloud of dust.

A cloud of incense. Ezek. 8.

4. The dark or varied colors, in veins or spots, on stones or other bodies, are called clouds.

5. A great multitude; a vast collection.

Seeing we are encompassed with so great a cloud of witnesses. Heb. 12.

CLOUD, v.t. To overspread with a cloud or clouds; as, the sky is clouded; clouds intercept the rays of the sun. Hence,

2. To obscure; to darken; as, to cloud the day, or truth, or reason.

3. To darken in veins or spots; to variegate with colors; as clouded marble.

4. To make of a gloomy aspect; to give the appearance of sullenness.

What sullen fury clouds his scornful brow.

5. To sully; to tarnish.

CLOUD, v.i. To grow cloudy; to become obscure with clouds; sometimes followed by over; as, the sky clouds over.


CLOUD, n. [I have not found this word in any other language. The sense is obvious – a collection. Its elements are those of clod, and L. claudo.]

  1. A collection of visible vapor, or watery particles, suspended in the atmosphere, at some altitude. A like collection of vapors near the earth is usually called fog. – Locke. I do set my bow in the cloud. – Gen. ix. Behold a white cloud. – Rev. xiv.
  2. A state of obscurity or darkness. – Waller. Addison.
  3. A collection of smoke, or a dense collection of dust, rising or floating in the air; as, a cloud of dust. A cloud of incense. – Ezek. viii.
  4. The dark or varied colors, in veins or spots, on stones or other bodies, are called clouds.
  5. A great multitude; a vast collection. Seeing we are encompassed with so great a cloud of witnesses. – Heb. xii.

CLOUD, v.i.

To grow cloudy; to become obscure with clouds; sometimes followed by over; as, the sky clouds over.


CLOUD, v.t.

  1. To overspread with a cloud or clouds; as, the sky is clouded; clouds intercept the rays of the sun. Hence,
  2. To obscure; to darken; as, to cloud the day, or truth, or reason.
  3. To darken in veins or spots; to variegate with colors; as, clouded marble.
  4. To make of a gloomy aspect; to give the appearance of sullenness. What sullen fury clouds his scornful brow. – Pope.
  5. To sully; to tarnish. – Shak.

Cloud
  1. A collection of visible vapor, or watery particles, suspended in the upper atmosphere.

    I do set my bow in the cloud.
    Gen. ix. 13.

    * A classification of clouds according to their chief forms was first proposed by the meteorologist Howard, and this is still substantially employed. The following varieties and subvarieties are recognized: (a) Cirrus. This is the most elevated of all the forms of clouds; is thin, long-drawn, sometimes looking like carded wool or hair, sometimes like a brush or room, sometimes in curl-like or fleecelike patches. It is the cat's-tail of the sailor, and the mare's-tail of the landsman. (b) Cumulus. This form appears in large masses of a hemispherical form, or nearly so, above, but flat below, one often piled above another, forming great clouds, common in the summer, and presenting the appearance of gigantic mountains crowned with snow. It often affords rain and thunder gusts. (c) Stratus. This form appears in layers or bands extending horizontally. (d) Nimbus. This form is characterized by its uniform gray tint and ragged edges; it covers the sky in seasons of continued rain, as in easterly storms, and is the proper rain cloud. The name is sometimes used to denote a raining cumulus, or cumulostratus. (e) Cirro-cumulus. This form consists, like the cirrus, of thin, broken, fleecelice clouds, but the parts are more or less rounded and regulary grouped. It is popularly called mackerel sky. (f) Cirro-stratus. In this form the patches of cirrus coalesce in long strata, between cirrus and stratus. (g) Cumulo-stratus. A form between cumulus and stratus, often assuming at the horizon a black or bluish tint. -- Fog, cloud, motionless, or nearly so, lying near or in contact with the earth's surface. -- Storm scud, cloud lying quite low, without form, and driven rapidly with the wind.

  2. To overspread or hide with a cloud or clouds] as, the sky is clouded.
  3. To grow cloudy; to become obscure with clouds; -- often used with up.

    Worthies, away! The scene begins to cloud.
    Shak.

  4. A mass or volume of smoke, or flying dust, resembling vapor.

    "A thick cloud of incense." Ezek. viii. 11.
  5. To darken or obscure, as if by hiding or enveloping with a cloud; hence, to render gloomy or sullen.

    One day too late, I fear me, noble lord,
    Hath clouded all thy happy days on earth.
    Shak.

    Be not disheartened, then, nor cloud those looks.
    Milton.

    Nothing clouds men's minds and impairs their honesty like prejudice.
    M. Arnold.

  6. A dark vein or spot on a lighter material, as in marble; hence, a blemish or defect; as, a cloud upon one's reputation; a cloud on a title.
  7. To blacken; to sully; to stain; to tarnish; to damage; -- esp. used of reputation or character.

    I would not be a stander-by to hear
    My sovereign mistress clouded so, without
    My present vengeance taken.
    Shak.

  8. That which has a dark, lowering, or threatening aspect; that which temporarily overshadows, obscures, or depresses; as, a cloud of sorrow; a cloud of war; a cloud upon the intellect.
  9. To mark with, or darken in, veins or sports; to variegate with colors; as, to cloud yarn.

    And the nice conduct of a clouded cane.
    Pope.

  10. A great crowd or multitude; a vast collection.

    "So great a cloud of witnesses." Heb. xii. 1.
  11. A large, loosely-knitted scarf, worn by women about the head.

    Cloud on a (or the) title (Law), a defect of title, usually superficial and capable of removal by release, decision in equity, or legislation. -- To be under a cloud, to be under suspicion or in disgrace; to be in disfavor. -- In the clouds, in the realm of facy and imagination; beyond reason; visionary.

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Cloud

CLOUD, noun [I have not found this word in any other language. The sense is obvious--a collection.]

1. A collection f visible vapor, or watery particles, suspended in the atmosphere, at some altitude. A like collection of vapors near the earth is usually called fog.

I do set my bow in the cloud Genesis 9:13.

Behold, a white cloud Revelation 14:14.

2. A state of obscurity or darkness.

3. A collection of smoke, or a dense collection of dust, rising or floating in the air; as a cloud of dust.

A cloud of incense. Ezekiel 8:11.

4. The dark or varied colors, in veins or spots, on stones or other bodies, are called clouds.

5. A great multitude; a vast collection.

Seeing we are encompassed with so great a cloud of witnesses. Hebrews 12:1.

CLOUD, verb transitive To overspread with a cloud or clouds; as, the sky is clouded; clouds intercept the rays of the sun. Hence,

2. To obscure; to darken; as, to cloud the day, or truth, or reason.

3. To darken in veins or spots; to variegate with colors; as clouded marble.

4. To make of a gloomy aspect; to give the appearance of sullenness.

What sullen fury clouds his scornful brow.

5. To sully; to tarnish.

CLOUD, verb intransitive To grow cloudy; to become obscure with clouds; sometimes followed by over; as, the sky clouds over.

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Scriptural basis

— Gloria (Houston, TX)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

pentagyn

PEN'TAGYN, n. [Gr. five, and a female.] In botany, a plant having five pistils.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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