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Tuesday - February 18, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [challenge]

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challenge

CHALLENGE, n. Literally, a calling, or crying out, the primary sense of many words expressing a demand, as claim. Hence appropriately,

1. A calling upon one to fight in single combat; an invitation or summons, verbal or written, to decide a controversy by a duel. Hence the letter containing the summons is also called a challenge.

2. A claim or demand made of a right or supposed right.

There must be no challenge of superiority.

3. Among hunters, the opening and crying of hounds at the first finding the scent of their game.

4. In law, an exception to jurors; the claim of a party that certain jurors shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause; that is, a calling them off. The right of challenge is given both in civil and criminal trials, for certain causes which are supposed to disqualify a juror to be an impartial judge. The right of challenge extends either to the whole panel or array, or only to particular jurors, called a challenge to the polls. A principal challenge is that which the law allows without cause assigned. A challenge to the favor, is when the party alleges a special cause. In criminal cases, a prisoner may challenge twenty jurors, without assigning a cause. This is called a peremptory challenge.

CHALLENGE, VT

1. To call, invite or summon to answer for an offense by single combat, or duel.

2. To call to a contest; to invite to a trial; as, I challenge a man to prove what he asserts, implying defiance.

3. To accuse; to call to answer.

4. To claim as due; to demand as a right; as, the Supreme Being challenges our reverence and homage.

5. In law, to call off a juror, or jurors; or to demand that jurors shall not sit in trial upon a cause. [See the noun.]

6. To call to the performance of conditions.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [challenge]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

CHALLENGE, n. Literally, a calling, or crying out, the primary sense of many words expressing a demand, as claim. Hence appropriately,

1. A calling upon one to fight in single combat; an invitation or summons, verbal or written, to decide a controversy by a duel. Hence the letter containing the summons is also called a challenge.

2. A claim or demand made of a right or supposed right.

There must be no challenge of superiority.

3. Among hunters, the opening and crying of hounds at the first finding the scent of their game.

4. In law, an exception to jurors; the claim of a party that certain jurors shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause; that is, a calling them off. The right of challenge is given both in civil and criminal trials, for certain causes which are supposed to disqualify a juror to be an impartial judge. The right of challenge extends either to the whole panel or array, or only to particular jurors, called a challenge to the polls. A principal challenge is that which the law allows without cause assigned. A challenge to the favor, is when the party alleges a special cause. In criminal cases, a prisoner may challenge twenty jurors, without assigning a cause. This is called a peremptory challenge.

CHALLENGE, VT

1. To call, invite or summon to answer for an offense by single combat, or duel.

2. To call to a contest; to invite to a trial; as, I challenge a man to prove what he asserts, implying defiance.

3. To accuse; to call to answer.

4. To claim as due; to demand as a right; as, the Supreme Being challenges our reverence and homage.

5. In law, to call off a juror, or jurors; or to demand that jurors shall not sit in trial upon a cause. [See the noun.]

6. To call to the performance of conditions.

CHAL'LENGE, n. [Norm. calenge, an accusation; chalunge, a claim; challenger, to claim; from the root of call, Gr. καλεω, κελλω, L. calo. See Call. Literally, a calling, or crying out, the primary sense of many words expressing a demand, as claim, L. clamo. Hence appropriately,]

  1. A calling upon one to fight in single combat; an invitation or summons, verbal or written, to decide a controversy a duel. Hence the letter containing the summons is also called a challenge.
  2. A claim or demand made of a right or supposed right. There must be no challenge of superiority. – Collier.
  3. Among hunters, the opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game. – Encyc.
  4. In law, an exception to jurors; the claim of a party that certain jurors shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause; that is, a calling them off. The right of challenge is given both in civil and criminal trials, for certain causes which are supposed to disqualify a juror to be an impartial judge. The right of challenge extends either to the whole panel or array, or only to particular jurors, called a challenge to the polls. A principal challenge is that which the law allows without cause assigned. A challenge to the favor, is when the party alledges a special cause. In criminal cases, a prisoner may challenge twenty jurors, without assigning a cause. This is called a peremptory challenge. – Blackstone.

CHAL'LENGE, v.t.

  1. To call, invite or summon to answer for an offense by single combat, or duel.
  2. To call to a contest; to invite to a trial; as, I challenge a man to prove what he asserts, implying defiance.
  3. To accuse; to call to answer. – Spenser. Shak.
  4. To claim as due; to demand as a right; as, the Supreme Being challenges our reverence and homage.
  5. In law, to call off a juror, or jurors; or to demand that jurors shall not sit in trial upon a cause. [See the noun.]
  6. To call to the performance of conditions.

Chal"lenge
  1. An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons.

    A challenge to controversy.
    Goldsmith.

  2. To call to a contest of any kind] to call to answer; to defy.

    I challenge any man to make any pretense to power by right of fatherhood.
    Locke.

  3. To assert a right; to claim a place.

    Where nature doth with merit challenge.
    Shak.

  4. The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign.
  5. To call, invite, or summon to answer for an offense by personal combat.

    By this I challenge him to single fight.
    Shak.

  6. A claim or demand.

    [Obs.]

    There must be no challenge of superiority.
    Collier.

  7. To claim as due; to demand as a right.

    Challenge better terms.
    Addison.

  8. The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game.
  9. To censure; to blame.

    [Obs.]

    He complained of the emperors . . . and challenged them for that he had no greater revenues . . . from them.
    Holland.

  10. An exception to a juror or to a member of a court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause.

    Blackstone
  11. To question or demand the countersign from (one who attempts to pass the lines); as, the sentinel challenged us, with "Who comes there?"
  12. An exception to a person as not legally qualified to vote. The challenge must be made when the ballot is offered.

    [U. S.]

    Challenge to the array (Law), an exception to the whole panel. -- Challenge to the favor, the alleging a special cause, the sufficiency of which is to be left to those whose duty and office it is to decide upon it. -- Challenge to the polls, an exception taken to any one or more of the individual jurors returned. -- Peremptory challenge, a privilege sometimes allowed to defendants, of challenging a certain number of jurors (fixed by statute in different States) without assigning any cause. -- Principal challenge, that which the law allows to be sufficient if found to be true.

  13. To take exception to; question; as, to challenge the accuracy of a statement or of a quotation.
  14. To object to or take exception to, as to a juror, or member of a court.
  15. To object to the reception of the vote of, as on the ground that the person in not qualified as a voter.

    [U. S.]

    To challenge to the array, favor, polls. See under Challenge, n.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Challenge

CHALLENGE, noun Literally, a calling, or crying out, the primary sense of many words expressing a demand, as claim. Hence appropriately,

1. A calling upon one to fight in single combat; an invitation or summons, verbal or written, to decide a controversy by a duel. Hence the letter containing the summons is also called a challenge

2. A claim or demand made of a right or supposed right.

There must be no challenge of superiority.

3. Among hunters, the opening and crying of hounds at the first finding the scent of their game.

4. In law, an exception to jurors; the claim of a party that certain jurors shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause; that is, a calling them off. The right of challenge is given both in civil and criminal trials, for certain causes which are supposed to disqualify a juror to be an impartial judge. The right of challenge extends either to the whole panel or array, or only to particular jurors, called a challenge to the polls. A principal challenge is that which the law allows without cause assigned. A challenge to the favor, is when the party alleges a special cause. In criminal cases, a prisoner may challenge twenty jurors, without assigning a cause. This is called a peremptory challenge

CHALLENGE, VT

1. To call, invite or summon to answer for an offense by single combat, or duel.

2. To call to a contest; to invite to a trial; as, I challenge a man to prove what he asserts, implying defiance.

3. To accuse; to call to answer.

4. To claim as due; to demand as a right; as, the Supreme Being challenges our reverence and homage.

5. In law, to call off a juror, or jurors; or to demand that jurors shall not sit in trial upon a cause. [See the noun.]

6. To call to the performance of conditions.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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