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Friday - July 19, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [calamus]

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calamus

CALAMUS, n.

1. The generic name of the Indian cane, called also rotang. It is without branches, has a crown at the top, and is beset with spines.

2. In antiquity, a pipe or fistula, a wind instrument, made of a reed or oaten stalk.

3. A rush or reed used anciently as a pen to write on parchment or papyrus.

4. A sort of reed, or sweet-scented cane, used by the Jews as a perfume. It is a knotty root, reddish without and white within, and filled with a spungy substance. It has an aromatic smell.

5. The sweet flag, called by Linne Acorus.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [calamus]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

CALAMUS, n.

1. The generic name of the Indian cane, called also rotang. It is without branches, has a crown at the top, and is beset with spines.

2. In antiquity, a pipe or fistula, a wind instrument, made of a reed or oaten stalk.

3. A rush or reed used anciently as a pen to write on parchment or papyrus.

4. A sort of reed, or sweet-scented cane, used by the Jews as a perfume. It is a knotty root, reddish without and white within, and filled with a spungy substance. It has an aromatic smell.

5. The sweet flag, called by Linne Acorus.

CAL'A-MUS, n. [L. from Gr. καλαμος, a stalk or stem, a reed, stubble; Eth. and Ar. قَلَمٌ, kalaman, calamus scriptorius, a writing reed, or pen. The verb in Arabic signifies to cut or pare. But qu., for it would seem to be allied to culmus.]

  1. The generic name of the Indian cane, called also Rotang. It is without branches, has a crown at the top, and is beset with spines. – Encyc.
  2. In antiquity, a pipe or fistula, a wind instrument, made of a reed or oaten stalk. – Encyc.
  3. A rush or reed, used anciently as a pen to write on parchment or papyrus. – Encyc.
  4. A sort of reed, or sweet-scented cane, used by the Jews as a perfume. It is a knotty root, reddish without and white within, and filled with a spungy substance. It has an aromatic smell. – Brown. Calmet.
  5. The sweet flag, called by Linnæus, Acorus. – Encyc.

Cal"a*mus
  1. The indian cane, a plant of the Palm family. It furnishes the common rattan. See Rattan, and Dragon's blood.
  2. A species of Acorus (A. calamus), commonly called calamus, or sweet flag. The root has a pungent, aromatic taste, and is used in medicine as a stomachic; the leaves have an aromatic odor, and were formerly used instead of rushes to strew on floors.
  3. The horny basal portion of a feather; the barrel or quill.
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Calamus

CALAMUS, noun

1. The generic name of the Indian cane, called also rotang. It is without branches, has a crown at the top, and is beset with spines.

2. In antiquity, a pipe or fistula, a wind instrument, made of a reed or oaten stalk.

3. A rush or reed used anciently as a pen to write on parchment or papyrus.

4. A sort of reed, or sweet-scented cane, used by the Jews as a perfume. It is a knotty root, reddish without and white within, and filled with a spungy substance. It has an aromatic smell.

5. The sweet flag, called by Linne Acorus.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

waste

WASTE, v.t. [G., L.]

1. To diminish by gradual dissipation or loss. Thus disease wastes the patient; sorrows waste the strength and spirits.

2. To cause to be lost; to destroy by scattering or by injury. Thus cattle waste their fodder when fed in the open field.

3. To expend without necessity or use; to destroy wantonly or luxuriously; to squander; to cause to be lost through wantonness or negligence. Careless people waste their fuel, their food or their property. Children waster their inheritance.

And wasted his substance with riotous living. Luke 15.

4. To destroy in enmity; to desolate; as, to waste an enemys country.

5. To suffer to be lost unnecessarily; or to throw away; as, to waste the blood and treasure of a nation.

6. To destroy by violence.

The Tyber insults our walls, and wastes our fruitful grounds.

7. To impair strength gradually.

Now wasting years my former strength confounds.

8. To lose in idleness or misery; to wear out.

Here condemnd to waste eternal days in woe and pain.

9. To spend; to consume.

O were I able to waste it all myself, and leave you none.

10. In law, to damage, impair or injure, as an estate, voluntarily, or by suffering the buildings, fences, &c. To go to decay. See the Noun.

11. To exhaust; to be consumed by time or mortality.

Till your carcasses be wasted in the wilderness. Numbers 14.

12. To scatter and lose for want of use or of occupiers.

Full many a flowr is born to blush unseen, and waste its sweetness on the desert air.

WASTE, v.i.

1. To dwindle; to be diminished; to lose bulk or substance gradually; as, the body wastes in sickness.

The barrel of meal shall not waste. 1 Kings 17.

2. To be diminished or lost by slow dissipation, consumption or evaporation; as, water wastes by evaporation; fuel wastes in combustion.

3. To be consumed by time or mortality.

Gut man dieth, and wasteth away. Job 14.

WASTE, a.

1. Destroyed; ruined.

The Sophi leaves all waste in his retreat.

2. Desolate; uncultivated; as a waste country; a waste howling wilderness. Deuteronomy 32.

3. Destitute; stripped; as lands laid waste.

4. Superfluous; lost for want of occupiers.

--And strangled with her waste fertility.

5. Worthless; that which is rejected, or used only for mean purposes; as waste wood.

6. That of which no account is taken, or of which no value is found; as waste paper.

7. Uncultivated; untilled; unproductive.

There is yet much waste land in England.

Laid waste, desolated; ruined.

WASTE, n.

1. The act of squandering; the dissipation of property through wantonness, ambition, extravagance, luxury or negligence.

For all this waste of wealth, and loss of blood.

2. Consumption; loss; useless expense; any loss or destruction which is neither necessary nor promotive of a good end; a loss for which there is no equivalent; as a waste of goods or money; a waste of time; a waste of labor; a waste of words.

Little wastes in great establishments, constantly occurring, may defeat the energies of a mighty capital.

3. A desolate or uncultivated country. The plains of Arabia are mostly a wide waste.

4. Land untilled, though capable of tillage; as the wastes in England.

5. Ground, space or place unoccupied; as the etherial waste.

In the dead waste and middle of the night.

6. Region ruined and deserted.

All the leafy nation sinks at last, and Vulcan rides in triumph oer the waste.

7. Mischief; destruction.

He will never, I think, in the way of waste, attempt us again.

8. In law, spoil, destruction or injury done to houses, woods, fences, lands, &c., by a tenant for life or for years, to the prejudice of the heir, or of him in reversion or remainder. Waste is voluntary, as by pulling down buildings; or permissive, as by suffering them to fall for want of necessary repairs. Whatever does a lasting damage to the freehold, is a waste.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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