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Tuesday - October 22, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [bush]

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bush

BUSH, n. [L. pasco, originally, to feed on sprouts.]

1. A shrub with branches; a thick shrub; also, a cluster of shrubs. With hunters, a fox tail.

2. An assemblage of branches interwoven.

3. A branch of a tree fixed or hung out as a tavern sign. Hence, since the branch has been discontinued, a coronated frame of wood hung out as a tavern sign, is so called. Hence the English proverb, "Good wine needs no bush."

[I know not that this word is thus used in the U. States.]

4. A circle of metal let into the sheaves of such blocks as have iron pins, to prevent their wearing.

This word when applied to sheaves is called bush, but when applied to the circular iron of a cart wheel is, in America, called a box.

BUSH, v.i. To grow thick or bushy.

BUSH, v.t. To furnish a block with a bush.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bush]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BUSH, n. [L. pasco, originally, to feed on sprouts.]

1. A shrub with branches; a thick shrub; also, a cluster of shrubs. With hunters, a fox tail.

2. An assemblage of branches interwoven.

3. A branch of a tree fixed or hung out as a tavern sign. Hence, since the branch has been discontinued, a coronated frame of wood hung out as a tavern sign, is so called. Hence the English proverb, "Good wine needs no bush."

[I know not that this word is thus used in the U. States.]

4. A circle of metal let into the sheaves of such blocks as have iron pins, to prevent their wearing.

This word when applied to sheaves is called bush, but when applied to the circular iron of a cart wheel is, in America, called a box.

BUSH, v.i. To grow thick or bushy.

BUSH, v.t. To furnish a block with a bush.


BUSH, n. [D. bosch; G. busch; Dan. busk; Sw. buska; It. bosco; Sp. bosque; Port. bosque; whence Sp. boscage, Fr. bocage, It. boscata, a grove or cluster of trees. Qu. Gr. βοσκω, L. pasco, originally, to feed on sprouts.]

  1. A shrub with branches; a thick shrub; also, a cluster of shrubs. With hunters, a fox tail. – Spenser. Waller. Encyc. Ash.
  2. An assemblage of branches interwoven. – Encyc.
  3. A branch of a tree fixed or hung out as a tavern sign. Hence, since the branch has been discontinued, a coronated frame of wood hung out as a tavern sign, is so called. Hence the English proverb, “Good wine needs no bush.” – Encyc. [I know not that this word is thus used in the United States.]
  4. A circle of metal let into the sheaves of such blocks as have iron pins, to prevent their wearing. – Mar. Dict. The word is applicable to a like circle in other round holes, as to the key-hole of a watch, the vent of a gun, &c. This word when applied to sheaves is called bush, but when applied to the circular iron of a cart wheel is, in America, called a box. Qu. It. bosso, the box-tree; bossolo, a little box. Johnson writes it bushel.

BUSH, v.i.

To grow thick or bushy. – Milton.


BUSH, v.t.

To furnish a block with a bush, or to line any orifice with metal to prevent wearing.


Bush
  1. A thicket, or place abounding in trees or shrubs; a wild forest.

    * This was the original sense of the word, as in the Dutch bosch, a wood, and was so used by Chaucer. In this sense it is extensively used in the British colonies, especially at the Cape of Good Hope, and also in Australia and Canada; as, to live or settle in the bush.

  2. To branch thickly in the manner of a bush.

    "The bushing alders." Pope.
  3. To set bushes for] to support with bushes; as, to bush peas.
  4. A lining for a hole to make it smaller; a thimble or ring of metal or wood inserted in a plate or other part of machinery to receive the wear of a pivot or arbor.

    Knight.

    * In the larger machines, such a piece is called a box, particularly in the United States.

  5. To furnish with a bush, or lining; as, to bush a pivot hole.
  6. A shrub; esp., a shrub with branches rising from or near the root; a thick shrub or a cluster of shrubs.

    To bind a bush of thorns among sweet-smelling flowers.
    Gascoigne.

  7. To use a bush harrow on (land), for covering seeds sown; to harrow with a bush; as, to bush a piece of land; to bush seeds into the ground.
  8. A piece of copper, screwed into a gun, through which the venthole is bored.

    Farrow.
  9. A shrub cut off, or a shrublike branch of a tree; as, bushes to support pea vines.
  10. A shrub or branch, properly, a branch of ivy (as sacred to Bacchus), hung out at vintners' doors, or as a tavern sign; hence, a tavern sign, and symbolically, the tavern itself.

    If it be true that good wine needs no bush, 't is true that a good play needs no epilogue.
    Shak.

  11. The tail, or brush, of a fox.

    To beat about the bush, to approach anything in a round-about manner, instead of coming directly to it; -- a metaphor taken from hunting. -- Bush bean (Bot.), a variety of bean which is low and requires no support (Phaseolus vulgaris, variety nanus). See Bean, 1. -- Bush buck, or Bush goat (Zoöl.), a beautiful South African antelope (Tragelaphus sylvaticus); -- so called because found mainly in wooden localities. The name is also applied to other species. -- Bush cat (Zoöl.), the serval. See Serval. -- Bush chat (Zoöl.), a bird of the genus Pratincola, of the Thrush family. -- Bush dog. (Zoöl.) See Potto. -- Bush hammer. See Bushhammer in the Vocabulary. -- Bush harrow (Agric.) See under Harrow. -- Bush hog (Zoöl.), a South African wild hog (Potamochœrus Africanus); -- called also bush pig, and water hog. -- Bush master (Zoöl.), a venomous snake (Lachesis mutus) of Guinea; -- called also surucucu. -- Bush pea (Bot.), a variety of pea that needs to be bushed. -- Bush shrike (Zoöl.), a bird of the genus Thamnophilus, and allied genera; -- called also batarg. Many species inhabit tropical America. -- Bush tit (Zoöl.), a small bird of the genus Psaltriparus, allied to the titmouse. P. minimus inhabits California.

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Bush

BUSH, noun [Latin pasco, originally, to feed on sprouts.]

1. A shrub with branches; a thick shrub; also, a cluster of shrubs. With hunters, a fox tail.

2. An assemblage of branches interwoven.

3. A branch of a tree fixed or hung out as a tavern sign. Hence, since the branch has been discontinued, a coronated frame of wood hung out as a tavern sign, is so called. Hence the English proverb, 'Good wine needs no bush '

[I know not that this word is thus used in the U. States.]

4. A circle of metal let into the sheaves of such blocks as have iron pins, to prevent their wearing.

This word when applied to sheaves is called bush but when applied to the circular iron of a cart wheel is, in America, called a box.

BUSH, verb intransitive To grow thick or bushy.

BUSH, verb transitive To furnish a block with a bush

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Less politically correct definitions.

— Peggy (Chatsworth, CA)

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IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

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He believes himself a man of importance.

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Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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