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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [brake]

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brake

BRAKE, pp. of break. [See Break.]

BRAKE, n. [L. erica; Gr. to break.]

1. Brake is a name given to fern, or rather to the female fern, a species of cryptogamian plants, of the genus Pteris, whose fructification is in lines under the margin of the leaf or frond.

2. A place overgrown with brake.

3. A thicket; a place overgrown with shrubs and brambles.

4. In the U. States, a thicket of canes, as a cane-brake; but I believe used only in composition.

BRAKE, n. [See Break.] An instrument to break flax or hemp.

1. The handle or lever by which a pump is worked; that is, brac, brachium, an arm.

2. A baker's kneading trough.

3. A sharp bit, or snaffle.

4. A machine for confining refractory horses, while the smith is shoeing them.

5. That part of the carriage of a movable battery or engine which enables it to turn.

6. A large heavy harrow for breaking clods after plowing; called also a drag.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [brake]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BRAKE, pp. of break. [See Break.]

BRAKE, n. [L. erica; Gr. to break.]

1. Brake is a name given to fern, or rather to the female fern, a species of cryptogamian plants, of the genus Pteris, whose fructification is in lines under the margin of the leaf or frond.

2. A place overgrown with brake.

3. A thicket; a place overgrown with shrubs and brambles.

4. In the U. States, a thicket of canes, as a cane-brake; but I believe used only in composition.

BRAKE, n. [See Break.] An instrument to break flax or hemp.

1. The handle or lever by which a pump is worked; that is, brac, brachium, an arm.

2. A baker's kneading trough.

3. A sharp bit, or snaffle.

4. A machine for confining refractory horses, while the smith is shoeing them.

5. That part of the carriage of a movable battery or engine which enables it to turn.

6. A large heavy harrow for breaking clods after plowing; called also a drag.

BRAKE, n. [See Break.]

  1. An instrument or machine to break flax or hemp.
  2. The handle or lever by which a pump is worked; that is brac, brachium, an arm.
  3. A baker's kneading trough.
  4. A sharp bit, or snaffle.
  5. A machine for confining refractory horses while the smith is shoeing them. – Johnson.
  6. That part of the carriage of a movable battery, or engine which enables it to turn. – Farifax.
  7. A large heavy harrow for breaking clods after plowing; called also a drag.
  8. A something that is or may be used to stop the motion of a body.

BRAKE, n. [W. brwg; Ir. fraoch; Port. brejo; Sp. brezo; Dan. bregne; G. breche; L. erica; Gr. ερικω, ερεικω, to break. So named probably from its roughness or broken appearance.]

  1. Brake is a name given to fern, or rather to the female fern, a species of cryptogamian plants of the genus Pteris, whose fructification is in lines under the margin of the leaf or a frond. – Fam. of Plants. Encyc.
  2. A place overgrown with brake. – Encyc.
  3. A thicket; a place overgrown with shrubs and brambles. – Johnson.
  4. In the United States, a thicket of canes, as a cane-brake; but I believe used only in composition. – Ellicott.

BRAKE, pp. [of Break. Obs.]

[See Break.]


Brake
  1. imp. of Break.

    [Arhaic] Tennyson.
  2. A fern of the genus Pteris, esp. the P. aquilina, common in almost all countries. It has solitary stems dividing into three principal branches. Less properly: Any fern.
  3. An instrument or machine to break or bruise the woody part of flax or hemp so that it may be separated from the fiber.
  4. A thicket; a place overgrown with shrubs and brambles, with undergrowth and ferns, or with canes.

    Rounds rising hillocks, brakes obscure and rough,
    To shelter thee from tempest and from rain.
    Shak.

    He stayed not for brake, and he stopped not for stone.
    Sir W. Scott.

    Cane brake, a thicket of canes. See Canebrake.

  5. An extended handle by means of which a number of men can unite in working a pump, as in a fire engine.
  6. A baker's kneading though.

    Johnson.
  7. A sharp bit or snaffle.

    Pampered jades . . . which need nor break nor bit.
    Gascoigne.

  8. A frame for confining a refractory horse while the smith is shoeing him; also, an inclosure to restrain cattle, horses, etc.

    A horse . . . which Philip had bought . . . and because of his fierceness kept him within a brake of iron bars.
    J. Brende.

  9. That part of a carriage, as of a movable battery, or engine, which enables it to turn.
  10. An ancient engine of war analogous to the crossbow and ballista.
  11. A large, heavy harrow for breaking clods after plowing; a drag.
  12. A piece of mechanism for retarding or stopping motion by friction, as of a carriage or railway car, by the pressure of rubbers against the wheels, or of clogs or ratchets against the track or roadway, or of a pivoted lever against a wheel or drum in a machine.
  13. An apparatus for testing the power of a steam engine, or other motor, by weighing the amount of friction that the motor will overcome; a friction brake.
  14. A cart or carriage without a body, used in breaking in horses.
  15. An ancient instrument of torture.

    Holinshed.

    Air brake. See Air brake, in the Vocabulary. -- Brake beam or Brake bar, the beam that connects the brake blocks of opposite wheels. -- Brake block. (a) The part of a brake holding the brake shoe. (b) A brake shoe. -- Brake shoe or Brake rubber, the part of a brake against which the wheel rubs. -- Brake wheel, a wheel on the platform or top of a car by which brakes are operated. -- Continuous brake . See under Continuous.

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Brake

BRAKE, participle passive of break. [See Break.]

BRAKE, noun [Latin erica; Gr. to break.]

1. brake is a name given to fern, or rather to the female fern, a species of cryptogamian plants, of the genus Pteris, whose fructification is in lines under the margin of the leaf or frond.

2. A place overgrown with brake

3. A thicket; a place overgrown with shrubs and brambles.

4. In the U. States, a thicket of canes, as a cane-brake; but I believe used only in composition.

BRAKE, noun [See Break.] An instrument to break flax or hemp.

1. The handle or lever by which a pump is worked; that is, brac, brachium, an arm.

2. A baker's kneading trough.

3. A sharp bit, or snaffle.

4. A machine for confining refractory horses, while the smith is shoeing them.

5. That part of the carriage of a movable battery or engine which enables it to turn.

6. A large heavy harrow for breaking clods after plowing; called also a drag.

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Want a Christian perspective on the definition of words

— Matthew (Holland, MI)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

undisciplined

UNDIS'CIPLINED, a.

1. Not disciplined; not duly exercised and taught; not subdued to regularity and order; raw; as undisciplined troops; undisciplined valor.

2. Not instructed; untaught; as undisciplined minds.

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