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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [brace]

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brace

BRACE, n. [L. brachium; Gr. the arm.]

1. In architecture, a piece of timber framed in with bevel joints, to keep the building from swerving either way. It extends like an arm from the post or main timber.

2. That which holds any thing tight; a cincture or bandage. The braces of a drum are not bands.

3. A pair; a couple; as a brace of ducks. It is used of persons only in contempt, or in the style of drollery.

4. In music, a double curve at the beginning of stave.

5. A thick strap, which supports a carriage on wheels.

6. A crooked line in printing, connecting two or more words or lines; thus boll, bowl. It is used to connect triplets in poetry.

7. In marine language, a rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, to square or traverse the yard. The name is given also to pieces of iron which are used as supports; such as of the poop lanterns, &c.

8. Brace, or brasse,is a foreign measure answering to our fathom.

9. Harness; warlike preparation; as we say, girded for battle.

10. Tension; tightness.

11. Braces, plu., suspenders, the straps that sustain pantaloons, &c.

12. The braces of a drum, are the cords on the sides of it, for tightening the heads and snares.

BRACE, v.t. To draw tight; to tighten; to bind or tie close; to make tight and firm.

1. To make tense; to strain up; as, to brace a drum.

2. To furnish with braces; as, to brace a building.

3. To strengthen; to increase tension; as, to brace the nerves.

4. In marine language, to bring the yards to either side.

To brace about is to turn the yards round for the contrary tack.

To brace sharp is to cause the yards to have the smallest possible angle with the keel.

To brace to is to check or ease off the leg braces, and round-in the weather ones, to assist in tacking.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [brace]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BRACE, n. [L. brachium; Gr. the arm.]

1. In architecture, a piece of timber framed in with bevel joints, to keep the building from swerving either way. It extends like an arm from the post or main timber.

2. That which holds any thing tight; a cincture or bandage. The braces of a drum are not bands.

3. A pair; a couple; as a brace of ducks. It is used of persons only in contempt, or in the style of drollery.

4. In music, a double curve at the beginning of stave.

5. A thick strap, which supports a carriage on wheels.

6. A crooked line in printing, connecting two or more words or lines; thus boll, bowl. It is used to connect triplets in poetry.

7. In marine language, a rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, to square or traverse the yard. The name is given also to pieces of iron which are used as supports; such as of the poop lanterns, &c.

8. Brace, or brasse,is a foreign measure answering to our fathom.

9. Harness; warlike preparation; as we say, girded for battle.

10. Tension; tightness.

11. Braces, plu., suspenders, the straps that sustain pantaloons, &c.

12. The braces of a drum, are the cords on the sides of it, for tightening the heads and snares.

BRACE, v.t. To draw tight; to tighten; to bind or tie close; to make tight and firm.

1. To make tense; to strain up; as, to brace a drum.

2. To furnish with braces; as, to brace a building.

3. To strengthen; to increase tension; as, to brace the nerves.

4. In marine language, to bring the yards to either side.

To brace about is to turn the yards round for the contrary tack.

To brace sharp is to cause the yards to have the smallest possible angle with the keel.

To brace to is to check or ease off the leg braces, and round-in the weather ones, to assist in tacking.


BRACE, n. [Fr. bras; Sp. brazo; Port. braço; Arm. breach, or breh; Ir. brac, and raigh; W. braic; Corn. breck, or breh; L. brachium; Gr. βραχιων, the arm. This word furnishes a clear and decisive evidence of the change of a palatal letter into a sibilant. The change comes through the Spanish or other Celtic dialect, brach, brazo, the Sp. z being originally a palatal or guttural; thence to the Fr. bras, and Eng. brace. In like manner, Durazzo is formed from Dyrrachium. The Greek verbs furnish a multitude of similar changes. This word furnishes also a proof that b is a prefix, for in Irish, brac is written also raigh. The sense of arm is, that which breaks forth, a shoot. From bras, the French have embrasser, to embrace, and in Sp. brazas is braces, and bracear, is to brace, and to swing the arms. Brace, in naval affairs, is in D. bras; Dan. bras, and braser, to brace. Qu. is this the same word as the Fr. bras, an arm?]

  1. In architecture, a piece of timber framed in with bevel-joints, to keep the building from swerving either way. It extends like an arm from the post or main timber.
  2. That which holds any thing tight; a cincture or bandage. The braces of a drum are not bands.
  3. A pair; a couple; as, a brace of ducks. It is used of persons, only in contempt, or in a style of drollery.
  4. In music, a double curve at the beginning of a stave.
  5. A thick strap, which supports a carriage on wheels.
  6. A crooked line in printing, connecting two or more words or lines; thus, boll, or bowl. It is used to connect triplets in poetry.
  7. In marine language, a rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, to square or traverse the yard. The name is given also to pieces of iron which are used as supports; such as the poop lanterns, &c. – Mar. Dict.
  8. Brace, or brasse, is a foreign measure answering to our fathom.
  9. Harness; warlike preparation; as, we say, girded for battle. – Shak.
  10. Tension; tightness. – Holder.
  11. Braces, [plur.,] suspenders, the straps that sustain pantaloons, &c.
  12. The braces of a drum, are the cords on the sides of it, for tightening the heads and snares.

BRACE, v.t.

  1. To draw tight; to tighten; to bind or tie close; to make tight and firm.
  2. To make tense; to strain up; as, to brace a drum.
  3. To furnish with braces; as, to brace a building.
  4. To strengthen; to increase tension; as, to brace the nerves.
  5. In marine language, to bring the yards to either side. To brace about, is to turn the yards round for the contrary tack. To brace sharp, is to cause the yards to have the smallest possible angle with the keel. To brace to, is to check or ease off the lee braces, and round-in the weather ones, to assist in tacking. – Mar. Dict.

Brace
  1. That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop.
  2. To furnish with braces] to support; to prop; as, to brace a beam in a building.
  3. To get tone or vigor; to rouse one's energies; -- with up.

    [Colloq.]
  4. A cord, ligament, or rod, for producing or maintaining tension, as a cord on the side of a drum.

    The little bones of the ear drum do in straining and relaxing it as the braces of the war drum do in that.
    Derham.

  5. To draw tight; to tighten; to put in a state of tension; to strain; to strengthen; as, to brace the nerves.

    And welcome war to brace her drums.
    Campbell.

  6. The state of being braced or tight; tension.

    The laxness of the tympanum, when it has lost its brace or tension.
    Holder.

  7. To bind or tie closely; to fasten tightly.

    The women of China, by bracing and binding them from their infancy, have very little feet.
    Locke.

    Some who spurs had first braced on.
    Sir W. Scott.

  8. A piece of material used to transmit, or change the direction of, weight or pressure] any one of the pieces, in a frame or truss, which divide the structure into triangular parts. It may act as a tie, or as a strut, and serves to prevent distortion of the structure, and transverse strains in its members. A boiler brace is a diagonal stay, connecting the head with the shell.
  9. To place in a position for resisting pressure; to hold firmly; as, he braced himself against the crowd.

    A sturdy lance in his right hand he braced.
    Fairfax.

  10. A vertical curved line connecting two or more words or lines, which are to be taken together; thus, boll, bowl; or, in music, used to connect staves.
  11. To move around by means of braces; as, to brace the yards.

    To brace about (Naut.), to turn (a yard) round for the contrary tack. -- To brace a yard (Naut.), to move it horizontally by means of a brace. -- To brace in (Naut.), to turn (a yard) by hauling in the weather brace. -- To brace one's self, to call up one's energies. "He braced himself for an effort which he was little able to make." J. D. Forbes. -- To brace to (Naut.), to turn (a yard) by checking or easing off the lee brace, and hauling in the weather one, to assist in tacking. -- To brace up (Naut.), to bring (a yard) nearer the direction of the keel by hauling in the lee brace. -- To brace up sharp (Naut.), to turn (a yard) as far forward as the rigging will permit.

  12. A rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, by which the yard is moved horizontally; also, a rudder gudgeon.
  13. A curved instrument or handle of iron or wood, for holding and turning bits, etc.; a bitstock.
  14. A pair; a couple; as, a brace of ducks; now rarely applied to persons, except familiarly or with some contempt.

    "A brace of greyhounds." Shak.

    He is said to have shot . . . fifty brace of pheasants.
    Addison.

    A brace of brethren, both bishops, both eminent for learning and religion, now appeared in the church.
    Fuller.

    But you, my brace of lords.
    Shak.

  15. Straps or bands to sustain trousers; suspenders.

    I embroidered for you a beautiful pair of braces.
    Thackeray.

  16. Harness; warlike preparation.

    [Obs.]

    For that it stands not in such warlike brace.
    Shak.

  17. Armor for the arm; vantbrace.
  18. The mouth of a shaft.

    [Cornwall]

    Angle brace. See under Angle.

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Brace

BRACE, noun [Latin brachium; Gr. the arm.]

1. In architecture, a piece of timber framed in with bevel joints, to keep the building from swerving either way. It extends like an arm from the post or main timber.

2. That which holds any thing tight; a cincture or bandage. The braces of a drum are not bands.

3. A pair; a couple; as a brace of ducks. It is used of persons only in contempt, or in the style of drollery.

4. In music, a double curve at the beginning of stave.

5. A thick strap, which supports a carriage on wheels.

6. A crooked line in printing, connecting two or more words or lines; thus boll, bowl. It is used to connect triplets in poetry.

7. In marine language, a rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, to square or traverse the yard. The name is given also to pieces of iron which are used as supports; such as of the poop lanterns, etc.

8. brace or brasse, is a foreign measure answering to our fathom.

9. Harness; warlike preparation; as we say, girded for battle.

10. Tension; tightness.

11. Braces, plural , suspenders, the straps that sustain pantaloons, etc.

12. The braces of a drum, are the cords on the sides of it, for tightening the heads and snares.

BRACE, verb transitive To draw tight; to tighten; to bind or tie close; to make tight and firm.

1. To make tense; to strain up; as, to brace a drum.

2. To furnish with braces; as, to brace a building.

3. To strengthen; to increase tension; as, to brace the nerves.

4. In marine language, to bring the yards to either side.

To brace about is to turn the yards round for the contrary tack.

To brace sharp is to cause the yards to have the smallest possible angle with the keel.

To brace to is to check or ease off the leg braces, and round-in the weather ones, to assist in tacking.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

uncrowded

UNCROWD'ED, a. Not crowded; not compressed; not straitened for want of room.

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