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Thursday - August 13, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [bound]

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bound

BOUND, n.

1. A limit; the line which comprehends the whole of any given object or space. It differs from boundary. See the latter. Bound is applied to kingdoms, states,cities, towns, tracts of land, and to territorial jurisdiction.

2. A limit by which any excursion is restrained; the limit of indulgence or desire; as, the love of money knows no bounds.

3. A leap; a spring; a jump; a rebound.

4. In dancing, a spring from one foot to the other.

BOUND, v.t. To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension,whether of natural or moral objects, as of land, or empire, or of passion, desire,indulgence. Hence, to restrain or confine; as, to bound our wishes. To bound in is hardly legitimate.

1. To make to bound.

BOUND, v.i. To leap; to jump; to spring; to move forward by leaps.

Before his lord the ready spaniel bounds.

1. To rebound--but the sense is the same.

BOUND, pret. and pp. of bind. As a participle, made fast by a band,or by chains or fetters; obliged by moral ties; confined; restrained.

1. As a participle or perhaps more properly an adj.,destined; tending; going, or intending to go; with to or for; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz.

The application of this word,in this use, is taken from the orders given for the government of the voyage,implying obligation, or from tending, stretching. So destined implies being bound.

Bound is used in composition, as in ice-bound, wind-bound, when a ship is confined or prevented from sailing by ice or by contrary winds.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bound]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BOUND, n.

1. A limit; the line which comprehends the whole of any given object or space. It differs from boundary. See the latter. Bound is applied to kingdoms, states,cities, towns, tracts of land, and to territorial jurisdiction.

2. A limit by which any excursion is restrained; the limit of indulgence or desire; as, the love of money knows no bounds.

3. A leap; a spring; a jump; a rebound.

4. In dancing, a spring from one foot to the other.

BOUND, v.t. To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension,whether of natural or moral objects, as of land, or empire, or of passion, desire,indulgence. Hence, to restrain or confine; as, to bound our wishes. To bound in is hardly legitimate.

1. To make to bound.

BOUND, v.i. To leap; to jump; to spring; to move forward by leaps.

Before his lord the ready spaniel bounds.

1. To rebound--but the sense is the same.

BOUND, pret. and pp. of bind. As a participle, made fast by a band,or by chains or fetters; obliged by moral ties; confined; restrained.

1. As a participle or perhaps more properly an adj.,destined; tending; going, or intending to go; with to or for; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz.

The application of this word,in this use, is taken from the orders given for the government of the voyage,implying obligation, or from tending, stretching. So destined implies being bound.

Bound is used in composition, as in ice-bound, wind-bound, when a ship is confined or prevented from sailing by ice or by contrary winds.


BOUND, n. [Norm. bonne, boune, a bound; bond, limited; bundes, limits; from bind, bond, that which binds; or from French bondir, to spring, and denoting the utmost extent.]

  1. A limit; the line which comprehends the whole of any given object or space. It differs from boundary. See the latter. Bound is applied to kingdoms, states, cities, towns, tracts of land, and to territorial jurisdiction.
  2. A limit by which any excursion is restrained; the limit of indulgence or desire; as, the love of money knows no bounds.
  3. A leap; a spring; a jump; a rebound; [Fr. bondir, to spring.]
  4. In dancing, a spring from one foot to the other.

BOUND, pp. [and pret. of Bind.]

  1. As a participle, made fast by a band, or by chains or fetters; obliged by moral ties; confined; restrained.
  2. As a participle, or perhaps more properly as adjective, destined; tending; going, or intending to go; with to or for; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz. The application of this word, in this use, is taken from the orders given for the government of the voyage, implying obligation, or from tending, stretching. So destined implies being bound. Bound is used in composition, as in ice-bound, wind-bound, when a ship is confined or prevented from sailing by ice or by contrary winds.

BOUND, v.i. [Fr. bondir; Arm. boundiçza.]

  1. To leap; to jump; to spring; to move forward by leaps. Before his lord the ready spaniel bounds. – Pope.
  2. To rebound - but the sense is the same.

BOUND, v.t.

  1. To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension, whether of natural or moral objects, as of land, or empire, or of passion, desire, indulgence. Hence, to restrain or confine; as, to bound our wishes. To bound in is hardly legitimate.
  2. To make to bound. – Shak.

Bound
  1. The external or limiting line, either real or imaginary, of any object or space; that which limits or restrains, or within which something is limited or restrained; limit; confine; extent; boundary.

    He hath compassed the waters with bounds.
    Job xxvi. 10.

    On earth's remotest bounds.
    Campbell.

    And mete the bounds of hate and love.
    Tennyson.

    To keep within bounds, not to exceed or pass beyond assigned limits; to act with propriety or discretion.

    Syn. -- See Boundary.

  2. To limit] to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension of; -- said of natural or of moral objects; to lie along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine.

    Where full measure only bounds excess.
    Milton.

    Phlegethon . . .
    Whose fiery flood the burning empire bounds.
    Dryden.

  3. To move with a sudden spring or leap, or with a succession of springs or leaps; as the beast bounded from his den; the herd bounded across the plain.

    Before his lord the ready spaniel bounds.
    Pope.

    And the waves bound beneath me as a steed
    That knows his rider.
    Byron.

  4. To make to bound or leap; as, to bound a horse.

    [R.] Shak.
  5. A leap; an elastic spring; a jump.

    A bound of graceful hardihood.
    Wordsworth.

  6. Restrained by a hand, rope, chain, fetters, or the like.
  7. Ready or intending to go; on the way toward; going; -- with to or for, or with an adverb of motion; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz.

    "The mariner bound homeward." Cowper.
  8. To name the boundaries of; as, to bound France.
  9. To rebound, as an elastic ball.
  10. To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; as, to bound a ball on the floor.

    [Collog.]
  11. Rebound; as, the bound of a ball.

    Johnson.
  12. Inclosed in a binding or cover] as, a bound volume.
  13. Spring from one foot to the other.
  14. Under legal or moral restraint or obligation.
  15. Constrained or compelled; destined; certain; -- followed by the infinitive; as, he is bound to succeed; he is bound to fail.
  16. Resolved; as, I am bound to do it.

    [Collog. U. S.]
  17. Constipated; costive.

    * Used also in composition; as, icebound, windbound, hidebound, etc.

    Bound bailiff (Eng. Law), a sheriff's officer who serves writs, makes arrests, etc. The sheriff being answerable for the bailiff's misdemeanors, the bailiff is usually under bond for the faithful discharge of his trust. -- Bound up in, entirely devoted to; inseparable from.

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Bound

BOUND, noun

1. A limit; the line which comprehends the whole of any given object or space. It differs from boundary. See the latter. bound is applied to kingdoms, states, cities, towns, tracts of land, and to territorial jurisdiction.

2. A limit by which any excursion is restrained; the limit of indulgence or desire; as, the love of money knows no bounds.

3. A leap; a spring; a jump; a rebound.

4. In dancing, a spring from one foot to the other.

BOUND, verb transitive To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension, whether of natural or moral objects, as of land, or empire, or of passion, desire, indulgence. Hence, to restrain or confine; as, to bound our wishes. To bound in is hardly legitimate.

1. To make to bound

BOUND, verb intransitive To leap; to jump; to spring; to move forward by leaps.

Before his lord the ready spaniel bounds.

1. To rebound--but the sense is the same.

BOUND, preterit tense and participle passive of bind. As a participle, made fast by a band, or by chains or fetters; obliged by moral ties; confined; restrained.

1. As a participle or perhaps more properly an adj., destined; tending; going, or intending to go; with to or for; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz.

The application of this word, in this use, is taken from the orders given for the government of the voyage, implying obligation, or from tending, stretching. So destined implies being bound

BOUND is used in composition, as in ice-bound, wind-bound, when a ship is confined or prevented from sailing by ice or by contrary winds.

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This is important for study, especially in order to understand more perfectly the truer meaning of words used when the Holy Bible was translated from the Hebrew and Greek. This facilitates genuine comprehension...to get the understanding. Prov 4:7

— Barbara (Lemont, PA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

unproportioned

UNPROPORTIONED, a. not proportioned; not suitable.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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