HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Thursday - October 29, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [bottom]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

bottom

BOT'TOM, n.

1. The lowest part of any thing; as the bottom of a well, vat or ship; the bottom of a hill.

2. The ground under any body of water; as the bottom of the sea, of a river or lake.

3. The foundation or ground work of any thing, as of an edifice,or of any system or moral subject; the base, or that which supports any superstructure.

4. A low ground; a dale; a valley; applied in the U. States to the flat lands adjoining rivers, &c. It is so used in some parts of England.

5. The deepest part; that which is most remote from the view; as, let us examine this subject to the bottom.

6. Bound; limit.

There is no bottom in my voluptuousness.

7. The utmost extent or depth of cavity, or of intellect, whether deep or shallow.

I do see the bottom of justice Shallow.

8. The foundation, considered as the cause, spring or origin; the first moving cause; as, a foreign prince is at the bottom of the confederacy.

9. A ship or vessel. Goods imported in foreign bottoms pay a higher duty, than those imported in our own. Hence, a state of hazard,chance or risk; but in this sense it is used chiefly or solely in the singular. We say, venture not too much in one bottom; that is, do not hazard too much at a single risk.

10. A ball of thread.

11. The bottom of a lane or alley, is the lowest end. This phrase supposed a declivity; but it is often used for the most remote part, when there is very little declivity.

12. The bottom of beer, or other liquor,is the grounds or dregs.

13. In the language of jockeys, stamina, native strength; as a horse of good bottom.

BOT'TOM, v.t. To found or build upon; to fix upon as a support; followed by on; as, sound reasoning is bottomed on just premises.

1. To furnish with a seat or bottom; as, to bottom a chair.

2. To wind round something, as in making a ball of thread.

BOT'TOM, v.i. To rest upon, as its ultimate support.

Find on what foundation a proposition bottoms.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bottom]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BOT'TOM, n.

1. The lowest part of any thing; as the bottom of a well, vat or ship; the bottom of a hill.

2. The ground under any body of water; as the bottom of the sea, of a river or lake.

3. The foundation or ground work of any thing, as of an edifice,or of any system or moral subject; the base, or that which supports any superstructure.

4. A low ground; a dale; a valley; applied in the U. States to the flat lands adjoining rivers, &c. It is so used in some parts of England.

5. The deepest part; that which is most remote from the view; as, let us examine this subject to the bottom.

6. Bound; limit.

There is no bottom in my voluptuousness.

7. The utmost extent or depth of cavity, or of intellect, whether deep or shallow.

I do see the bottom of justice Shallow.

8. The foundation, considered as the cause, spring or origin; the first moving cause; as, a foreign prince is at the bottom of the confederacy.

9. A ship or vessel. Goods imported in foreign bottoms pay a higher duty, than those imported in our own. Hence, a state of hazard,chance or risk; but in this sense it is used chiefly or solely in the singular. We say, venture not too much in one bottom; that is, do not hazard too much at a single risk.

10. A ball of thread.

11. The bottom of a lane or alley, is the lowest end. This phrase supposed a declivity; but it is often used for the most remote part, when there is very little declivity.

12. The bottom of beer, or other liquor,is the grounds or dregs.

13. In the language of jockeys, stamina, native strength; as a horse of good bottom.

BOT'TOM, v.t. To found or build upon; to fix upon as a support; followed by on; as, sound reasoning is bottomed on just premises.

1. To furnish with a seat or bottom; as, to bottom a chair.

2. To wind round something, as in making a ball of thread.

BOT'TOM, v.i. To rest upon, as its ultimate support.

Find on what foundation a proposition bottoms.

BOT'TOM, n. [Sax. botm; Sw. botn; D. bodem; G. boden. It seems to be allied to Gr. βαθος, and to the Russ. pad, a valley, padayu, to fall. The sense is from throwing down, setting, laying or beating down; a dialect perhaps of basis. Class Bd.]

  1. The lowest part of any thing; as, the bottom of a well, vat or ship; the bottom of a hill.
  2. The ground under any body of water; as, the bottom of the sea, of a river or lake.
  3. The foundation or ground work of any thing, as of an edifice, or of any system or moral subject; the base, or that which supports any superstructure.
  4. A low ground; a dale; a valley; applied in the United States to the flat lands adjoining rivers, &c. It is so used in some parts of England. – Mitford.
  5. The deepest part; that which is most remote from the view; as, let us examine this subject to the bottom.
  6. Bound; limit. There is no bottom in my voluptuousness. – Shak.
  7. The utmost extent or depth of cavity, or of intellect, whether deep or shallow. I do see the bottom of justice Shallow. – Shak.
  8. The foundation, considered as the cause, spring or origin; the first moving cause; as, a foreign prince is at the bottom of the confederacy.
  9. A ship or vessel. Goods imported in foreign bottoms pay a higher duty than those imported in our own. Hence, a, state of hazard, chance or risk; but in this sense it is used chiefly or solely in the singular. We say, venture not too much in one bottom; that is, do not hazard too much at a single risk.
  10. A ball of thread. [W. botwm, a button; Corn. id. See Bottle.]
  11. The bottom of a lane or alley, is the lowest end. This phrase supposes a declivity; but it is often used for the most remote part, when there is very little declivity.
  12. The bottom of beer, or other liquor, is the grounds or dregs.
  13. In the language of jockeys, stamina, native strength; as, a horse of good bottom.

BOT'TOM, v.i.

To rest upon, as its ultimate support. Find on what foundation a proposition bottoms. – Locke.


BOT'TOM, v.t.

  1. To found or build upon; to fix upon as a support; followed by on; as, sound reasoning is bottomed on just premises.
  2. To furnish with a seat or bottom; as, to bottom a chair.
  3. To wind round something, as in making a ball of thread. – Shak.

Bot"tom
  1. The lowest part of anything; the foot; as, the bottom of a tree or well; the bottom of a hill, a lane, or a page.

    Or dive into the bottom of the deep.
    Shak.

  2. Of or pertaining to the bottom; fundamental; lowest; under; as, bottom rock; the bottom board of a wagon box; bottom prices.

    Bottom glade, a low glade or open place; a valley; a dale. Milton.

    -- Bottom grass, grass growing on bottom lands. -- Bottom land. See 1st Bottom, n., 7.

  3. To found or build upon] to fix upon as a support; -- followed by on or upon.

    Action is supposed to be bottomed upon principle.
    Atterbury.

    Those false and deceiving grounds upon which many bottom their eternal state].
    South.

  4. To rest, as upon an ultimate support; to be based or grounded; -- usually with on or upon.

    Find on what foundation any proposition bottoms.
    Locke.

  5. A ball or skein of thread; a cocoon.

    [Obs.]

    Silkworms finish their bottoms in . . . fifteen days.
    Mortimer.

  6. To wind round something, as in making a ball of thread.

    [Obs.]

    As you unwind her love from him,
    Lest it should ravel and be good to none,
    You must provide to bottom it on me.
    Shak.

  7. The part of anything which is beneath the contents and supports them, as the part of a chair on which a person sits, the circular base or lower head of a cask or tub, or the plank floor of a ship's hold; the under surface.

    Barrels with the bottom knocked out.
    Macaulay.

    No two chairs were alike; such high backs and low backs and leather bottoms and worsted bottoms.
    W. Irving.

  8. To furnish with a bottom; as, to bottom a chair.
  9. To reach or impinge against the bottom, so as to impede free action, as when the point of a cog strikes the bottom of a space between two other cogs, or a piston the end of a cylinder.
  10. That upon which anything rests or is founded, in a literal or a figurative sense; foundation; groundwork.
  11. To reach or get to the bottom of.

    Smiles.
  12. The bed of a body of water, as of a river, lake, sea.
  13. The fundament; the buttocks.
  14. An abyss.

    [Obs.] Dryden.
  15. Low land formed by alluvial deposits along a river; low-lying ground; a dale; a valley.

    "The bottoms and the high grounds." Stoddard.
  16. The part of a ship which is ordinarily under water; hence, the vessel itself; a ship.

    My ventures are not in one bottom trusted.
    Shak.

    Not to sell the teas, but to return them to London in the
    same bottoms in which they were shipped.
    Bancroft.

    Full bottom, a hull of such shape as permits carrying a large amount of merchandise.

  17. Power of endurance; as, a horse of a good bottom.
  18. Dregs or grounds; lees; sediment.

    Johnson.

    At bottom, At the bottom, at the foundation or basis; in reality. "He was at the bottom a good man." J. F. Cooper. -- To be at the bottom of, to be the cause or originator of; to be the source of. [Usually in an opprobrious sense.] J. H. Newman.

    He was at the bottom of many excellent counsels.
    Addison.

    -- To go to the bottom, to sink; esp. to be wrecked. -- To touch bottom, to reach the lowest point; to find something on which to rest.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

97

718

83

783

122

793
Bottom

BOT'TOM, noun

1. The lowest part of any thing; as the bottom of a well, vat or ship; the bottom of a hill.

2. The ground under any body of water; as the bottom of the sea, of a river or lake.

3. The foundation or ground work of any thing, as of an edifice, or of any system or moral subject; the base, or that which supports any superstructure.

4. A low ground; a dale; a valley; applied in the U. States to the flat lands adjoining rivers, etc. It is so used in some parts of England.

5. The deepest part; that which is most remote from the view; as, let us examine this subject to the bottom

6. Bound; limit.

There is no bottom in my voluptuousness.

7. The utmost extent or depth of cavity, or of intellect, whether deep or shallow.

I do see the bottom of justice Shallow.

8. The foundation, considered as the cause, spring or origin; the first moving cause; as, a foreign prince is at the bottom of the confederacy.

9. A ship or vessel. Goods imported in foreign bottoms pay a higher duty, than those imported in our own. Hence, a state of hazard, chance or risk; but in this sense it is used chiefly or solely in the singular. We say, venture not too much in one bottom; that is, do not hazard too much at a single risk.

10. A ball of thread.

11. The bottom of a lane or alley, is the lowest end. This phrase supposed a declivity; but it is often used for the most remote part, when there is very little declivity.

12. The bottom of beer, or other liquor, is the grounds or dregs.

13. In the language of jockeys, stamina, native strength; as a horse of good bottom

BOT'TOM, verb transitive To found or build upon; to fix upon as a support; followed by on; as, sound reasoning is bottomed on just premises.

1. To furnish with a seat or bottom; as, to bottom a chair.

2. To wind round something, as in making a ball of thread.

BOT'TOM, verb intransitive To rest upon, as its ultimate support.

Find on what foundation a proposition bottoms.

Why 1828?

0
6
 


Because it offers words that I can find from my King James Version bible that I can't find anywhere else

— Robin (Rainbow City, AL)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

bamboozle

BAMBOO'ZLE, v.t. To confound; to deceiving; to play low tricks. [ A low word.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

218

407

Compact Edition

201

154

CD-ROM

163

123

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 4.516 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top