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Tuesday - January 21, 2020

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [book]

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book

BOOK, n. [Like the Latin liber, book signifies primarily bark and beech, the tree being probably named from its bark.]

A general name of every literary composition which is printed; but appropriately, a printed composition bound; a volume. The name is given also to any number of written sheets when bound or sewed together, and to a volume of blank paper, intended for any species of writing, as for memorandums, for accounts, or receipts.

1. A particular part of a literary composition; a division of a subject in the same volume.

2. A volume or collection of sheets in which accounts are kept; a register of debts and credits, receipts and expenditures, &c.

In books, in kind remembrance; in favor.

I was so much in his books, that at his decease he left me his lamp.

Without book, by memory; without reading;without notes; as, a sermon was delivered without book. This phrase is used also in the sense of without authority; as,a man asserts without book.

BOOK, v.t. To enter, write or register in a book.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [book]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BOOK, n. [Like the Latin liber, book signifies primarily bark and beech, the tree being probably named from its bark.]

A general name of every literary composition which is printed; but appropriately, a printed composition bound; a volume. The name is given also to any number of written sheets when bound or sewed together, and to a volume of blank paper, intended for any species of writing, as for memorandums, for accounts, or receipts.

1. A particular part of a literary composition; a division of a subject in the same volume.

2. A volume or collection of sheets in which accounts are kept; a register of debts and credits, receipts and expenditures, &c.

In books, in kind remembrance; in favor.

I was so much in his books, that at his decease he left me his lamp.

Without book, by memory; without reading;without notes; as, a sermon was delivered without book. This phrase is used also in the sense of without authority; as,a man asserts without book.

BOOK, v.t. To enter, write or register in a book.


BOOK, n. [Sax. boc, a book and the beech-tree; Goth. boka; Icelandic, book; D. boek, a book, and the mast of beech; beuke, a beech-tree; G. buch, a book, and buche, a beech; Dan. bog; Sw. bok; Russ. buk; Gypsy, buchos. Like the Latin liber, book, signifies primarily bark and beech, the tree being probably named from its bark.]

  1. A general name of every literary composition which is printed; but appropriately, a printed composition bound; a volume. The name is given also to any number of written sheets when bound or sewed together, and to a volume of blank paper, intended for any species of writing, as for memorandums, for accounts, or receipts.
  2. A particular part of a literary composition; a division of a subject in the same volume.
  3. A volume or collection of sheets in which accounts are kept; a register of debts and credits, receipts and expenditures, &c. In books, in kind remembrance; in favor. I was so much in his books, that at his decease he left me his lamps. – Addison. Without book, by memory; without reading; without notes; as, a sermon was delivered without book. This phrase is used also in the sense of without authority; as, a man asserts without book.

BOOK, v.t.

To enter, write, or register in a book.


Book
  1. A collection of sheets of paper, or similar material, blank, written, or printed, bound together; commonly, many folded and bound sheets containing continuous printing or writing.

    * When blank, it is called a blank book. When printed, the term often distinguishes a bound volume, or a volume of some size, from a pamphlet.

    * It has been held that, under the copyright law, a book is not necessarily a volume made of many sheets bound together; it may be printed on a single sheet, as music or a diagram of patterns. Abbott.

  2. To enter, write, or register in a book or list.

    Let it be booked with the rest of this day's deeds.
    Shak.

  3. A composition, written or printed; a treatise.

    A good book is the precious life blood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life.
    Milton.

  4. To enter the name of (any one) in a book for the purpose of securing a passage, conveyance, or seat] as, to be booked for Southampton; to book a seat in a theater.
  5. A part or subdivision of a treatise or literary work; as, the tenth book of "Paradise Lost."
  6. To mark out for; to destine or assign for; as, he is booked for the valedictory.

    [Colloq.]

    Here I am booked for three days more in Paris.
    Charles Reade.

  7. A volume or collection of sheets in which accounts are kept; a register of debts and credits, receipts and expenditures, etc.
  8. Six tricks taken by one side, in the game of whist; in certain other games, two or more corresponding cards, forming a set.

    * Book is used adjectively or as a part of many compounds; as, book buyer, bookrack, book club, book lore, book sale, book trade, memorandum book, cashbook.

    Book account, an account or register of debt or credit in a book. -- Book debt, a debt for items charged to the debtor by the creditor in his book of accounts. -- Book learning, learning acquired from books, as distinguished from practical knowledge. "Neither does it so much require book learning and scholarship, as good natural sense, to distinguish true and false." Burnet. -- Book louse (Zoöl.), one of several species of minute, wingless insects injurious to books and papers. They belong to the Pseudoneuroptera. -- Book moth (Zoöl.), the name of several species of moths, the larvæ of which eat books. -- Book oath, an oath made on The Book, or Bible. -- The Book of Books, the Bible. -- Book post, a system under which books, bulky manuscripts, etc., may be transmitted by mail. -- Book scorpion (Zoöl.), one of the false scorpions (Chelifer cancroides) found among books and papers. It can run sidewise and backward, and feeds on small insects. -- Book stall, a stand or stall, often in the open air, for retailing books. -- Canonical books. See Canonical. -- In one's books, in one's favor. "I was so much in his books, that at his decease he left me his lamp." Addison. -- To bring to book. (a) To compel to give an account. (b) To compare with an admitted authority. "To bring it manifestly to book is impossible." M. Arnold. -- To curse by bell, book, and candle. See under Bell. -- To make a book (Horse Racing), to lay bets (recorded in a pocket book) against the success of every horse, so that the bookmaker wins on all the unsuccessful horses and loses only on the winning horse or horses. -- To speak by the book, to speak with minute exactness. -- Without book. (a) By memory. (b) Without authority.

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Book

BOOK, noun [Like the Latin liber, book signifies primarily bark and beech, the tree being probably named from its bark.]

A general name of every literary composition which is printed; but appropriately, a printed composition bound; a volume. The name is given also to any number of written sheets when bound or sewed together, and to a volume of blank paper, intended for any species of writing, as for memorandums, for accounts, or receipts.

1. A particular part of a literary composition; a division of a subject in the same volume.

2. A volume or collection of sheets in which accounts are kept; a register of debts and credits, receipts and expenditures, etc.

In books, in kind remembrance; in favor.

I was so much in his books, that at his decease he left me his lamp.

Without book by memory; without reading; without notes; as, a sermon was delivered without book This phrase is used also in the sense of without authority; as, a man asserts without book

BOOK, verb transitive To enter, write or register in a book

Why 1828?

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Because I mostly read Christian books written from that time because those people really had pure hearts for the Lord

— Ray (Durban)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

chromatically

CHROMATICALLY, adv. In the chromatic manner.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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monte

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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