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Bone [ BONE, n.1. A firm hard substance of a dull white color, composing ... ] :: Search the 1828 Noah Webster's Dictionary of the English Language (FREE) :: 1828.mshaffer.com
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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bone

BONE, n.

1. A firm hard substance of a dull white color, composing some part of the frame of an animal body. The bones of an animal support all the softer parts, as the flesh and vessels. They vary in texture in different bones, and in different parts of the same bone. The long bones are compact in their middle portion, with a central cavity occupied by a network of plates and fibers, and cellular or spongy at the extremities. The flat bones are compact externally, and cellular internally. The bones in a fetus are soft and cartilaginous, but they gradually harden with age. The ends of the long bones are larger than the middle, which renders the articulations more firm, and in the fetus are distinct portions, called epiphyses. Bones are supplied with blood vessels, and in the fetus, or in a diseased state, are very vascular. They are probably also furnished with nerves and absorbents, though less easily detected in a sound state. They are covered with a thin, strong membrane, called the periosteum, which, together with the bones, has very little sensibility in a sound state, but when inflamed, is extremely sensible. Their cells and cavities are occupied by a fatty substance, called the medulla or marrow. They consist of earthy matter, rather more than half, gelatin, one sixteenth, and cartilage, about one third of the whole. The earthy matter gives them their solidity, and consists of phosphate of lime, with a small portion of carbonate of lime and phosphate of magnesia.

2. A piece of bone, with fragments of meat adhering to it.

To be upon the bones, is to attack. [Little used, and vulgar.]

To make no bones, is to make no scruple; a metaphor taken from a dog who greedily swallows meat that has no bones.

Bones, a sort of bobbins, made of trotter bones, for weaving lace; also dice.

BONE, v.t. To take out bones from the flesh, as in cookery.

1. To put whale bone into stays.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bone]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BONE, n.

1. A firm hard substance of a dull white color, composing some part of the frame of an animal body. The bones of an animal support all the softer parts, as the flesh and vessels. They vary in texture in different bones, and in different parts of the same bone. The long bones are compact in their middle portion, with a central cavity occupied by a network of plates and fibers, and cellular or spongy at the extremities. The flat bones are compact externally, and cellular internally. The bones in a fetus are soft and cartilaginous, but they gradually harden with age. The ends of the long bones are larger than the middle, which renders the articulations more firm, and in the fetus are distinct portions, called epiphyses. Bones are supplied with blood vessels, and in the fetus, or in a diseased state, are very vascular. They are probably also furnished with nerves and absorbents, though less easily detected in a sound state. They are covered with a thin, strong membrane, called the periosteum, which, together with the bones, has very little sensibility in a sound state, but when inflamed, is extremely sensible. Their cells and cavities are occupied by a fatty substance, called the medulla or marrow. They consist of earthy matter, rather more than half, gelatin, one sixteenth, and cartilage, about one third of the whole. The earthy matter gives them their solidity, and consists of phosphate of lime, with a small portion of carbonate of lime and phosphate of magnesia.

2. A piece of bone, with fragments of meat adhering to it.

To be upon the bones, is to attack. [Little used, and vulgar.]

To make no bones, is to make no scruple; a metaphor taken from a dog who greedily swallows meat that has no bones.

Bones, a sort of bobbins, made of trotter bones, for weaving lace; also dice.

BONE, v.t. To take out bones from the flesh, as in cookery.

1. To put whale bone into stays.

BONE, n. [Sax. ban; Sw. ben; D. been, bone or leg; Ger. bein, a leg; Dan. been, leg or bone. The sense probably is, that which is set or fixed.]

  1. A firm hard substance, of a dull white color, composing some part of the frame of an animal body. The bones of an animal support all the softer parts, as the flesh and vessels. They vary in texture in different bones, and in different parts of the same bone. The long bones are compact in their middle portion, with a central cavity occupied by a network of plates and fibers, and cellular or spongy at the extremities. The flat bones are compact externally, and cellular internally. The bones in a fetus are soft and cartilaginous, but they gradually harden with age. The ends of the long bones are larger than the middle, which renders the articulations more firm, and in the fetus are distinct portions, called epiphyses. Bones are supplied with blood-vessels, and in the fetus, or in a diseased state, are very vascular. They are probably also furnished with nerves and absorbents, though less easily detected in a sound state. They are covered with a thin, strong membrane, called the periosteum, which, together with the bones, has very little sensibility in a sound state, but when inflamed, is extremely sensible. Their cells and cavities are occupied by a fatty substance, called the medulla or marrow. They consist of earthy matter rather more than half, gelatin one sixteenth, and cartilage about one third of the whole. The earthy matter gives them their solidity, and consists of phosphate of lime, with a small portion of carbonate of lime and phosphate of magnesia. – Cyc. Wistar. Thomson.
  2. A piece of bone, with fragments of meat adhering to it. To be upon the bones, is to attack. [Little used, and vulgar.] To make no bones, is to make no scruple; a metaphor taken from a dog who greedily swallows meat that has no bones. – Johnson. Bones, a sort of bobbins, made of trotter bones, for weaving lace; also, dice. – Johnson.

BONE, v.t.

  1. To take out bones from the flesh, as in cookery. – Johnson.
  2. To put whale-bone into stays. – Ash.

Bone
  1. The hard, calcified tissue of the skeleton of vertebrate animals, consisting very largely of calcic carbonate, calcic phosphate, and gelatine; as, blood and bone.

    * Even in the hardest parts of bone there are many minute cavities containing living matter and connected by minute canals, some of which connect with larger canals through which blood vessels ramify.

  2. To withdraw bones from the flesh of, as in cookery.

    "To bone a turkey." Soyer.
  3. To sight along an object or set of objects, to see if it or they be level or in line, as in carpentry, masonry, and surveying.

    Knight.

    Joiners, etc., bone their work with two straight edges. W.
    M. Buchanan.

  4. One of the pieces or parts of an animal skeleton; as, a rib or a thigh bone; a bone of the arm or leg; also, any fragment of bony substance. (pl.) The frame or skeleton of the body.
  5. To put whalebone into] as, to bone stays.

    Ash.
  6. Anything made of bone, as a bobbin for weaving bone lace.
  7. To fertilize with bone.
  8. Two or four pieces of bone held between the fingers and struck together to make a kind of music.
  9. To steal; to take possession of.

    [Slang]
  10. Dice.
  11. Whalebone; hence, a piece of whalebone or of steel for a corset.
  12. Fig.: The framework of anything.

    A bone of contention, a subject of contention or dispute. -- A bone to pick, something to investigate, or to busy one's self about; a dispute to be settled (with some one). -- Bone ash, the residue from calcined bones; -- used for making cupels, and for cleaning jewelry. - - Bone black (Chem.), the black, carbonaceous substance into which bones are converted by calcination in close vessels; - - called also animal charcoal. It is used as a decolorizing material in filtering sirups, extracts, etc., and as a black pigment. See Ivory black, under Black. -- Bone cave, a cave in which are found bones of extinct or recent animals, mingled sometimes with the works and bones of man. Am. Cyc. -- Bone dust, ground or pulverized bones, used as a fertilizer. -- Bone earth (Chem.), the earthy residuum after the calcination of bone, consisting chiefly of phosphate of calcium. -- Bone lace, a lace made of linen thread, so called because woven with bobbins of bone. -- Bone oil, an oil obtained by, heating bones (as in the manufacture of bone black), and remarkable for containing the nitrogenous bases, pyridine and quinoline, and their derivatives; -- also called Dippel's oil. -- Bone setter. Same as Bonesetter. See in the Vocabulary. -- Bone shark (Zoöl.), the basking shark. -- Bone spavin. See under Spavin. -- Bone turquoise, fossil bone or tooth of a delicate blue color, sometimes used as an imitation of true turquoise. -- Bone whale (Zoöl.), a right whale. - - To be upon the bones of, to attack. [Obs.] -- To make no bones, to make no scruple; not to hesitate. [Low] -- To pick a bone with, to quarrel with, as dogs quarrel over a bone; to settle a disagreement. [Colloq.]

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Bone

BONE, noun

1. A firm hard substance of a dull white color, composing some part of the frame of an animal body. The bones of an animal support all the softer parts, as the flesh and vessels. They vary in texture in different bones, and in different parts of the same bone The long bones are compact in their middle portion, with a central cavity occupied by a network of plates and fibers, and cellular or spongy at the extremities. The flat bones are compact externally, and cellular internally. The bones in a fetus are soft and cartilaginous, but they gradually harden with age. The ends of the long bones are larger than the middle, which renders the articulations more firm, and in the fetus are distinct portions, called epiphyses. Bones are supplied with blood vessels, and in the fetus, or in a diseased state, are very vascular. They are probably also furnished with nerves and absorbents, though less easily detected in a sound state. They are covered with a thin, strong membrane, called the periosteum, which, together with the bones, has very little sensibility in a sound state, but when inflamed, is extremely sensible. Their cells and cavities are occupied by a fatty substance, called the medulla or marrow. They consist of earthy matter, rather more than half, gelatin, one sixteenth, and cartilage, about one third of the whole. The earthy matter gives them their solidity, and consists of phosphate of lime, with a small portion of carbonate of lime and phosphate of magnesia.

2. A piece of bone with fragments of meat adhering to it.

To be upon the bones, is to attack. [Little used, and vulgar.]

To make no bones, is to make no scruple; a metaphor taken from a dog who greedily swallows meat that has no bones.

BONEs, a sort of bobbins, made of trotter bones, for weaving lace; also dice.

BONE, verb transitive To take out bones from the flesh, as in cookery.

1. To put whale bone into stays.

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I like the examples used from the King James Bible and like the traditional definitions.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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CLOSE-HANDEDNESS, n. Covetousness.

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