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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [bolt]

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bolt

BOLT,n. [L. pello.]

1. An arrow; a dart; a pointed shaft.

2. A strong cylindrical pin, of iron or other metal, used to fasten a door, a plank, a chain, &c. In ships, bolts are used in the sides and decks, and have different names, as rag-bolts, eye-bolts, ring-bolts,chain-bolts, &c. In gunnery, there are prise-bolts, transom-bolts, traverse-bolts, and bracket-bolts.

3. A thunder-bolt; a stream of lightning, so named from its darting like a bolt.

4. The quantity of twenty-eight ells of canvas.

BOLT, v.t. To fasten or secure with a bolt, or iron pin, whether a door, a plank, fetters or any thing else.

1. To fasten; to shackle; to restrain.

2. To blurt out; to utter or throw out precipitately.

I hate when vice can bolt her arguments.

In this sense it is often followed by out.

3. To sift or separate bran from flour. In America this term is applied only to the operation performed in mills.

4. Among sportsmen, to start or dislodge, used of coneys.

5. To examine by sifting; to open or separate the parts of a subject, to find the truth; generally followed by out. "Time and nature will bolt out the truth of things." [Inelegant.]

6. To purify; to purge. [Unusual.]

7. To discuss or argue; as at Gray's inn, where cases are privately discussed by students and barristers.

BOLT, v.i. To shoot forth suddenly; to spring out with speed and suddenness; to start forth like a bolt; commonly followed by out; as, to bolt out of the house, or out of a den.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bolt]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BOLT,n. [L. pello.]

1. An arrow; a dart; a pointed shaft.

2. A strong cylindrical pin, of iron or other metal, used to fasten a door, a plank, a chain, &c. In ships, bolts are used in the sides and decks, and have different names, as rag-bolts, eye-bolts, ring-bolts,chain-bolts, &c. In gunnery, there are prise-bolts, transom-bolts, traverse-bolts, and bracket-bolts.

3. A thunder-bolt; a stream of lightning, so named from its darting like a bolt.

4. The quantity of twenty-eight ells of canvas.

BOLT, v.t. To fasten or secure with a bolt, or iron pin, whether a door, a plank, fetters or any thing else.

1. To fasten; to shackle; to restrain.

2. To blurt out; to utter or throw out precipitately.

I hate when vice can bolt her arguments.

In this sense it is often followed by out.

3. To sift or separate bran from flour. In America this term is applied only to the operation performed in mills.

4. Among sportsmen, to start or dislodge, used of coneys.

5. To examine by sifting; to open or separate the parts of a subject, to find the truth; generally followed by out. "Time and nature will bolt out the truth of things." [Inelegant.]

6. To purify; to purge. [Unusual.]

7. To discuss or argue; as at Gray's inn, where cases are privately discussed by students and barristers.

BOLT, v.i. To shoot forth suddenly; to spring out with speed and suddenness; to start forth like a bolt; commonly followed by out; as, to bolt out of the house, or out of a den.


BOLT, n. [Dan. bolt; Russ. bolt; D. bout; G. bolzen; Sax. bolta, catapulta, that which is driven, from the roof of Gr. βαλλω, L. pello.]

  1. An arrow; a dart; a pointed shaft. – Dryden.
  2. A strong cylindrical pin, of iron or other metal, used to fasten a door, a plank, a chain, &c. In ships, bolts are used in the sides and decks, and have different names, as rag-bolts, eye-bolts, ring-bolts, chain-bolts, &c. In gunnery, there are prise-bolts, transom-bolts, traverse-bolts, and bracket-bolts.
  3. A thunder-bolt; a stream of lightning, so named from its darting like a bolt.
  4. The quantity of twenty-eight ells of canvas. – Encyc.

BOLT, v.i.

To shoot forth suddenly; to spring out with speed and suddenness; to start forth like a bolt; commonly followed by out; as, to bolt out of the house, or out of a den. – Dryden.


BOLT, v.t.

  1. To fasten or secure with a bolt or iron pin, whether a door, a plank, fetters, or any thing else.
  2. To fasten; to shackle; to restrain. – Shak.
  3. To blurt out; to utter or throw out precipitately. I hate when vice can bolt her arguments. – Milton. In this sense it is often followed by out.

BOLT, v.t. [Russ. boltayu, to shake, agitate, babble; Norm. bulter, a bolting sieve.]

  1. To sift or separate bran from flour, by passing the fine part of meal through a cloth.
  2. Among sportsmen, to start or dislodge, used of coneys.
  3. To examine by sifting; to open or separate the parts of a subject, to find the truth; generally followed by out. “Time and nature will bolt out the truth of things.” [Inelegant.] – L'Estrange.
  4. To purify; to purge. [Unusual.] – Shak.
  5. To discuss or argue; as at Gray's Inn, where cases are privately discussed by students and barristers. – Encyc.

Bolt
  1. A shaft or missile intended to be shot from a crossbow or catapult, esp. a short, stout, blunt-headed arrow; a quarrel; an arrow, or that which resembles an arrow; a dart.

    Look that the crossbowmen lack not bolts.
    Sir W. Scott.

    A fool's bolt is soon shot.
    Shak.

  2. To shoot] to discharge or drive forth.

  3. To start forth like a bolt or arrow; to spring abruptly; to come or go suddenly; to dart; as, to bolt out of the room.

    This Puck seems but a dreaming dolt, . . .
    And oft out of a bush doth bolt.
    Drayton.

  4. In the manner of a bolt; suddenly; straight; unbendingly.

    [He] came bolt up against the heavy dragoon.
    Thackeray.

    Bolt upright. (a) Perfectly upright; perpendicular; straight up; unbendingly erect. Addison. (b) On the back at full length. [Obs.] Chaucer.

  5. A sudden spring or start; a sudden spring aside; as, the horse made a bolt.
  6. To sift or separate the coarser from the finer particles of, as bran from flour, by means of a bolter; to separate, assort, refine, or purify by other means.

    He now had bolted all the flour.
    Spenser.

    Ill schooled in bolted language.
    Shak.

  7. A sieve, esp. a long fine sieve used in milling for bolting flour and meal; a bolter.

    B. Jonson.
  8. Lightning; a thunderbolt.
  9. To utter precipitately; to blurt or throw out.

    I hate when Vice can bolt her arguments.
    Milton.

  10. To strike or fall suddenly like a bolt.

    His cloudless thunder bolted on their heads.
    Milton.

  11. A sudden flight, as to escape creditors.

    This gentleman was so hopelessly involved that he contemplated a bolt to America -- or anywhere.
    Compton Reade.

  12. To separate, as if by sifting or bolting; -- with out.

    Time and nature will bolt out the truth of things.
    L'Estrange.

  13. A strong pin, of iron or other material, used to fasten or hold something in place, often having a head at one end and screw thread cut upon the other end.
  14. To swallow without chewing; as, to bolt food.
  15. To spring suddenly aside, or out of the regular path; as, the horse bolted.
  16. A refusal to support a nomination made by the party with which one has been connected; a breaking away from one's party.
  17. To discuss or argue privately, and for practice, as cases at law.

    Jacob.

    To bolt to the bran, to examine thoroughly, so as to separate or discover everything important. Chaucer.

    This bolts the matter fairly to the bran.
    Harte.

    The report of the committee was examined and sifted and bolted to the bran.
    Burke.

  18. A sliding catch, or fastening, as for a door or gate; the portion of a lock which is shot or withdrawn by the action of the key.
  19. To refuse to support, as a nomination made by a party to which one has belonged or by a caucus in which one has taken part.
  20. To refuse to support a nomination made by a party or a caucus with which one has been connected; to break away from a party.
  21. An iron to fasten the legs of a prisoner; a shackle; a fetter.

    [Obs.]

    Away with him to prison!
    lay bolts enough upon him.
    Shak.

  22. To cause to start or spring forth; to dislodge, as conies, rabbits, etc.
  23. A compact package or roll of cloth, as of canvas or silk, often containing about forty yards.
  24. To fasten or secure with, or as with, a bolt or bolts, as a door, a timber, fetters; to shackle; to restrain.

    Let tenfold iron bolt my door.
    Langhorn.

    Which shackles accidents and bolts up change.
    Shak.

  25. A bundle, as of oziers.

    Bolt auger, an auger of large size; an auger to make holes for the bolts used by shipwrights. -- Bolt and nut, a metallic pin with a head formed upon one end, and a movable piece (the nut) screwed upon a thread cut upon the other end. See B, C, and D, in illust. above.

    See Tap bolt, Screw bolt, and Stud bolt.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Bolt

BOLT,noun [Latin pello.]

1. An arrow; a dart; a pointed shaft.

2. A strong cylindrical pin, of iron or other metal, used to fasten a door, a plank, a chain, etc. In ships, bolts are used in the sides and decks, and have different names, as rag-bolts, eye-bolts, ring-bolts, chain-bolts, etc. In gunnery, there are prise-bolts, transom-bolts, traverse-bolts, and bracket-bolts.

3. A thunder-bolt; a stream of lightning, so named from its darting like a bolt

4. The quantity of twenty-eight ells of canvas.

BOLT, verb transitive To fasten or secure with a bolt or iron pin, whether a door, a plank, fetters or any thing else.

1. To fasten; to shackle; to restrain.

2. To blurt out; to utter or throw out precipitately.

I hate when vice can bolt her arguments.

In this sense it is often followed by out.

3. To sift or separate bran from flour. In America this term is applied only to the operation performed in mills.

4. Among sportsmen, to start or dislodge, used of coneys.

5. To examine by sifting; to open or separate the parts of a subject, to find the truth; generally followed by out. 'Time and nature will bolt out the truth of things.' [Inelegant.]

6. To purify; to purge. [Unusual.]

7. To discuss or argue; as at Gray's inn, where cases are privately discussed by students and barristers.

BOLT, verb intransitive To shoot forth suddenly; to spring out with speed and suddenness; to start forth like a bolt; commonly followed by out; as, to bolt out of the house, or out of a den.

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to get to the Bible's word meaning as close as possible to the original text

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

enform

ENFORM', v.t. To form; to fashion. [See Form.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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