HOME
SIGN UP LOGIN
https://1828.mshaffer.com
Sunday - December 8, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
- Preface

1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   <3

Search, browse, and study this dictionary to learn more about the early American, Christian language.

1828.mshaffer.comWord [bishop]

0
0
Cite this! Share Definition on Facebook Share Definition on Twitter Simple Definition Word-definition Evolution

bishop

BISH'OP, n. [L. episcopus; Gr. of, over, and inspector, or visitor; to view, or inspect; whence, to visit; also, to view. This Greek and Latin word accompanied the introduction of christianity into the west and north of Europe.]

1. An overseer; a spiritual superintendent, ruler or director; applied to Christ.

Ye were as sheep going astray, but are now returned to the shepherd and bishop of your souls. 1. Pet.2.

2. In the primitive church, a spiritual overseer; an elder or presbyter; one who had the pastoral care of a church.

The same persons are in this chapter called elders or presbyters,and overseers or bishops. Scott,Comm. Acts.20.

Till the churches were multiplied, the bishops and presbyters were the same. Ib. Phil.1.1. 1. Tim.3.1. Tit. 1.7.

Both the Greek and Latin fathers do, with one consent, declare, that bishops were called presbyters, and presbyters bishops, in apostolic times, the name being then common.

3. In the Greek, Latin, and some Protestant churches, a prelate, or person consecrated for the spiritual government and direction of a diocese. In Great Britain, bishops are nominated by the king, who, upon request of the dean and chapter, for leave to elect a bishop, sends a conge d'elire, or license to elect, with a letter missive, nominating the person whom he would have chosen. The election, by the chapter, must be made within twelve days, or the king has a right to appoint whom he pleases. Bishops are consecrated by an archbishop, with two assistant bishops. A bishop must be thirty years of age; and all bishops, except the bishop of Man, are peers of the realm.

By the canons of the Protestant Episcopal church in the United States, no diocese or state shall proceed to the election of a bishop, unless there are at least six officiating presbyters residing therein, who shall be qualified, according to the canons, to vote for a bishop; a majority of whom at least must concur in the election. But the conventions of two or more dioceses, or states, having together nine or more such presbyters,may join in the election of a bishop. A convention is composed of the clergy, and a lay delegation, consisting of one or more members from each parish. In every state, the bishop is to be chosen according to such rules as the convention of that state shall ordain. The mode of election, in most or all of the states,is by a concurrent vote of the clergy and laity, in convention, each body voting separately. Before a bishop can be consecrated, he must receive a testimonial of approbation from the General Convention of the church; or if that is not in session, from a majority of the standing committee in the several dioceses. The mode of consecrating bishops and ordaining priests and deacons differs not essentially from the practice in England.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bishop]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BISH'OP, n. [L. episcopus; Gr. of, over, and inspector, or visitor; to view, or inspect; whence, to visit; also, to view. This Greek and Latin word accompanied the introduction of christianity into the west and north of Europe.]

1. An overseer; a spiritual superintendent, ruler or director; applied to Christ.

Ye were as sheep going astray, but are now returned to the shepherd and bishop of your souls. 1. Pet.2.

2. In the primitive church, a spiritual overseer; an elder or presbyter; one who had the pastoral care of a church.

The same persons are in this chapter called elders or presbyters,and overseers or bishops. Scott,Comm. Acts.20.

Till the churches were multiplied, the bishops and presbyters were the same. Ib. Phil.1.1. 1. Tim.3.1. Tit. 1.7.

Both the Greek and Latin fathers do, with one consent, declare, that bishops were called presbyters, and presbyters bishops, in apostolic times, the name being then common.

3. In the Greek, Latin, and some Protestant churches, a prelate, or person consecrated for the spiritual government and direction of a diocese. In Great Britain, bishops are nominated by the king, who, upon request of the dean and chapter, for leave to elect a bishop, sends a conge d'elire, or license to elect, with a letter missive, nominating the person whom he would have chosen. The election, by the chapter, must be made within twelve days, or the king has a right to appoint whom he pleases. Bishops are consecrated by an archbishop, with two assistant bishops. A bishop must be thirty years of age; and all bishops, except the bishop of Man, are peers of the realm.

By the canons of the Protestant Episcopal church in the United States, no diocese or state shall proceed to the election of a bishop, unless there are at least six officiating presbyters residing therein, who shall be qualified, according to the canons, to vote for a bishop; a majority of whom at least must concur in the election. But the conventions of two or more dioceses, or states, having together nine or more such presbyters,may join in the election of a bishop. A convention is composed of the clergy, and a lay delegation, consisting of one or more members from each parish. In every state, the bishop is to be chosen according to such rules as the convention of that state shall ordain. The mode of election, in most or all of the states,is by a concurrent vote of the clergy and laity, in convention, each body voting separately. Before a bishop can be consecrated, he must receive a testimonial of approbation from the General Convention of the church; or if that is not in session, from a majority of the standing committee in the several dioceses. The mode of consecrating bishops and ordaining priests and deacons differs not essentially from the practice in England.


BISH'OP, n.1 [L. episcopus; Gr. επισκοπος, of επι, over, and σκοπος, inspector, or visitor; σκοπεω, to view or inspect; whence, επισκεπτομαι, to visit or inspect; also, επισκοπεω, to view. This Greek and Latin word accompanied the introduction of Christianity into the west and north of Europe, and has been corrupted into Saxon biscop, bisceop, Sw. and Dan. biskop, D. bisschop, Ger. bischof, It. vescovo, Fr. evêque, Sp. obispo, Port. bispo, W. esgob, and Ir. easgob. In Ar. and Pers. اُسْقُفْ oskof. This title the Athenians gave to those whom they sent into the provinces subject to them, to inspect the state of affairs; and the Romans gave the title to those who were inspectors of provisions.]

  1. An overseer; a spiritual superintendent, ruler or director: applied to Christ. Ye were as sheep going astray, but are now returned to the shepherd and bishop of your souls. – 1 Pet. ii.
  2. In the primitive Church, a spiritual overseer; an elder or presbyter; one who had the pastoral care of a church. The same persons are in this chapter called elders or presbyters, and overseers or bishops. – Scott. Comm. Acts xx. Till the churches were multiplied, the bishops and presbyters were the same. – Ib. Phil. i. 1.; 1 Tim. iii. 1; Titus. i. 7. Both the Greek and Latin fathers do, with one consent, declare, that bishops were called presbyters, and presbyters bishops, in apostolic times, the name being then common. – Whitby.
  3. In the Greek, Latin, and some Protestant churches, a prelate, or person consecrated for the spiritual government and direction of a diocese. In Great Britain, bishops are nominated by the king, who, upon request of the dean and chapter, for leave to elect a bishop, sends a congé d'elire or license to elect, with a letter missive, nominating the person whom he would have chosen. The election, by the chapter, must be made within twelve days, or the king has a right to appoint whom he pleases. Bishops are consecrated by an archbishop, with two assistant bishops. A bishop must be thirty years of age; and all bishops, except the bishop of Man, are peers of the realm. – Blackstone. By the canons of the Protestant Episcopal church in the United States, no diocese or state shall proceed to the election of a bishop, unless there are at least six officiating presbyters residing therein, who shall be qualified, according to the canons, to vote for a bishop; a majority of whom at least must concur in the election. But the conventions of two or more dioceses, or states, having together nine or more such presbyters, may join in the election of a bishop. A convention is composed of the clergy, and a lay delegation, consisting of one or more members from each parish. In every state, the bishop is to be chosen according to such rules as the convention of that state shall ordain. The mode of election, in most or all of the states, is by a concurrent vote of the clergy and laity, in convention, each body voting separately. Before a bishop can be consecrated, he must receive a testimonial of approbation from the General Convention of the church; or if that is not in session, from a majority of the standing committee in the several dioceses. The mode of consecrating bishops and ordaining priests and deacons, differs not essentially from the practice in England. – Bishop Brownell.

BISH'OP, n.2

  1. A cant word for a mixture of wine, oranges, and sugar. – Swift.
  2. A part of a lady's dress.

BISH'OP, v.t.

  1. To confirm; to admit solemnly into the church. – Johnson.
  2. Among horse-dealers, to use arts to make an old horse look like a young one, or to give a good appearance to a bad horse. – Ash. Encyc.

Bish"op
  1. A spiritual overseer, superintendent, or director.

    Ye were as sheep going astray; but are now returned unto the Shepherd and Bishop of your souls.
    1 Pet. ii. 25.

    It is a fact now generally recognized by theologians of all shades of opinion, that in the language of the New Testament the same officer in the church is called indifferently "bishop" ( (?) ) and "elder" or "presbyter."
    J. B. Lightfoot.

  2. To admit into the church by confirmation] to confirm; hence, to receive formally to favor.
  3. To make seem younger, by operating on the teeth] as, to bishop an old horse or his teeth.

    The plan adopted is to cut off all the nippers with a saw to the proper length, and then with a cutting instrument the operator scoops out an oval cavity in the corner nippers, which is afterwards burnt with a hot iron until it is black. J. H. Walsh.

  4. In the Roman Catholic, Greek, and Anglican or Protestant Episcopal churches, one ordained to the highest order of the ministry, superior to the priesthood, and generally claiming to be a successor of the Apostles. The bishop is usually the spiritual head or ruler of a diocese, bishopric, or see.

    Bishop in partibus [infidelium] (R. C. Ch.), a bishop of a see which does not actually exist; one who has the office of bishop, without especial jurisdiction. Shipley. -- Titular bishop (R. C. Ch.), a term officially substituted in 1882 for bishop in partibus. -- Bench of Bishops. See under Bench.

  5. In the Methodist Episcopal and some other churches, one of the highest church officers or superintendents.
  6. A piece used in the game of chess, bearing a representation of a bishop's miter; -- formerly called archer.
  7. A beverage, being a mixture of wine, oranges or lemons, and sugar.

    Swift.
  8. An old name for a woman's bustle.

    [U. S.]

    If, by her bishop, or her "grace" alone,
    A genuine lady, or a church, is known.
    Saxe.

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

Thank you for visiting!

  • Our goal is to try and improve the quality of the digital form of this dictionary being historically true and accurate to the first American dictionary. Read more ...
  • Below you will find three sketches from a talented artist and friend depicting Noah Webster at work. Please tell us what you think.
Divine Study
  • Divine StudyDivine Study
    Divine Study
Window of Reflection
  • Window of ReflectionWindow of Reflection
    Window of Reflection
Enlightening Grace
  • Enlightening GraceEnlightening Grace
    Enlightening Grace

87

653

71

703

101

700
Bishop

BISH'OP, noun [Latin episcopus; Gr. of, over, and inspector, or visitor; to view, or inspect; whence, to visit; also, to view. This Greek and Latin word accompanied the introduction of christianity into the west and north of Europe.]

1. An overseer; a spiritual superintendent, ruler or director; applied to Christ.

Ye were as sheep going astray, but are now returned to the shepherd and bishop of your souls. 1. Pet.2.

2. In the primitive church, a spiritual overseer; an elder or presbyter; one who had the pastoral care of a church.

The same persons are in this chapter called elders or presbyters, and overseers or bishops. Scott, Comm. Acts 20:1.

Till the churches were multiplied, the bishops and presbyters were the same. Ib. Philippians 1:1. 1. Tim.3.1. Titus 1:7.

Both the Greek and Latin fathers do, with one consent, declare, that bishops were called presbyters, and presbyters bishops, in apostolic times, the name being then common.

3. In the Greek, Latin, and some Protestant churches, a prelate, or person consecrated for the spiritual government and direction of a diocese. In Great Britain, bishops are nominated by the king, who, upon request of the dean and chapter, for leave to elect a bishop sends a conge d'elire, or license to elect, with a letter missive, nominating the person whom he would have chosen. The election, by the chapter, must be made within twelve days, or the king has a right to appoint whom he pleases. Bishops are consecrated by an archbishop, with two assistant bishops. A bishop must be thirty years of age; and all bishops, except the bishop of Man, are peers of the realm.

By the canons of the Protestant Episcopal church in the United States, no diocese or state shall proceed to the election of a bishop unless there are at least six officiating presbyters residing therein, who shall be qualified, according to the canons, to vote for a bishop; a majority of whom at least must concur in the election. But the conventions of two or more dioceses, or states, having together nine or more such presbyters, may join in the election of a bishop A convention is composed of the clergy, and a lay delegation, consisting of one or more members from each parish. In every state, the bishop is to be chosen according to such rules as the convention of that state shall ordain. The mode of election, in most or all of the states, is by a concurrent vote of the clergy and laity, in convention, each body voting separately. Before a bishop can be consecrated, he must receive a testimonial of approbation from the General Convention of the church; or if that is not in session, from a majority of the standing committee in the several dioceses. The mode of consecrating bishops and ordaining priests and deacons differs not essentially from the practice in England.

BISHOP,noun A cant word for a mixture of wine, oranges, and sugar.

BISHOP, verb transitive to confirm; to admit solemnly into the church.

1. Among horse-dealers, to use arts to make an old horse look like a young one, or to give a good appearance to a bad horse.

Why 1828?

2
2
 


It is important to me because I like to know the original intent of words especially when I read and study the Bible and U.S. History.

— Deborah (Kathleen, GA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

pastorly

P`ASTORLY , a. Becoming a pastor.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


Regards,


monte

{x:

Project:: 1828 Reprint










Hard-cover Edition

188

360

Compact Edition

149

125

CD-ROM

117

97

* As a note, I have purchased each of these products. In fact, as we have been developing the Project:: 1828 Reprint, I have purchased several of the bulky hard-cover dictionaries. My opinion is that the 2000-page hard-cover edition is the only good viable solution at this time. The compact edition was a bit disappointing and the CD-ROM as well.



[ + ]
Add Search To Your Site


Our goal is to convert the facsimile dictionary (PDF available: v1 and v2) to reprint it and make it digitally available in several formats.

Overview of Project

  1. Image dissection
  2. Text Emulation
  3. Dictionary Formatting
  4. Digital Applications
  5. Reprint

Please visit our friends:

{ourFriends}

Learn more about U.S. patents:

{ourPatent}

Privacy Policy

We want to provide the best 1828 dictionary service to you. As such, we collect data, allow you to login, and we want your feedback on other features you would like.

For details of our terms of use, please read our privacy policy here.

Page loaded in 0.289 seconds. [1828: 25, T:0]


1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

^ return to top
Back to Top