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Monday - October 21, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [bind]

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bind

BIND, v.t.

1. To tie together,or confine with a cord, or any thing that is flexible; to fasten as with a band, fillet or ligature.

2. To gird, inwrap or involve; to confine by a wrapper, cover or bandage; sometimes with up; as, to bind up a wound.

3. To confine or restrain, as with a chain, fetters or cord; as, bind him hand and foot.

4. To restrain in any manner.

He bindeth the floods from overflowing. Job.28.

5. To oblige by a promise, vow, stipulation, covenant, law, duty or any other moral tie; to engage.

If a man shall swear an oath to bind his soul with a bond. Numbers 30.

We are bound by the laws of kindness, of nature, of a state, &c.

6. To confirm or ratify.

Whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth, shall be bound in heaven. Matt.16.

7. To distress, trouble, or confine by infirmity.

Whom Satan hath bound these eighteen years. Luke 13.

8. To constrain by a powerful influence or persuasion.

I go bound in the spirit to Jerusalem. Acts.20.

9. To restrain the natural discharges of the bowels; to make costive; as, certain kinds of food bind the body or bowels.

10. To form a border; to fasten with a band, ribin, or any thing that strengthens the edges; as, to bind a garment or carpet.

11. To cover with leather or anything firm; to sew together and cover; as, to bind a book.

12. To cover or secure by a band; as, to bind a wheel with tire.

13. To oblige to serve, by contract; as, to bind an apprentice; often with out; as, to bind out a servant.

14. To make hard or firm; as, certain substances bind the earth.

To bind to is to contract; as, to bind one's self to a wife.

To bind over is to oblige by bond to appear at a court.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bind]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BIND, v.t.

1. To tie together,or confine with a cord, or any thing that is flexible; to fasten as with a band, fillet or ligature.

2. To gird, inwrap or involve; to confine by a wrapper, cover or bandage; sometimes with up; as, to bind up a wound.

3. To confine or restrain, as with a chain, fetters or cord; as, bind him hand and foot.

4. To restrain in any manner.

He bindeth the floods from overflowing. Job.28.

5. To oblige by a promise, vow, stipulation, covenant, law, duty or any other moral tie; to engage.

If a man shall swear an oath to bind his soul with a bond. Numbers 30.

We are bound by the laws of kindness, of nature, of a state, &c.

6. To confirm or ratify.

Whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth, shall be bound in heaven. Matt.16.

7. To distress, trouble, or confine by infirmity.

Whom Satan hath bound these eighteen years. Luke 13.

8. To constrain by a powerful influence or persuasion.

I go bound in the spirit to Jerusalem. Acts.20.

9. To restrain the natural discharges of the bowels; to make costive; as, certain kinds of food bind the body or bowels.

10. To form a border; to fasten with a band, ribin, or any thing that strengthens the edges; as, to bind a garment or carpet.

11. To cover with leather or anything firm; to sew together and cover; as, to bind a book.

12. To cover or secure by a band; as, to bind a wheel with tire.

13. To oblige to serve, by contract; as, to bind an apprentice; often with out; as, to bind out a servant.

14. To make hard or firm; as, certain substances bind the earth.

To bind to is to contract; as, to bind one's self to a wife.

To bind over is to oblige by bond to appear at a court.

BIND, n.

  1. A stalk of hops, so called from its winding round a pole or tree, or being bound to it.
  2. A bind of eels, is a quantity consisting of 10 strikes, each containing 25 eels, or 250 in the whole. – Encyc.
  3. Among miners, indurated clay, when much mixed with the oxyd of iron. – Kirwan.

BIND, v.i.

  1. To contract; to grow hard or stiff; as, clay binds by heat. – Mortimer.
  2. To grow or become costive.
  3. To be obligatory.

BIND, v.t. [pret. bound; pp. bound, and obs. bounden. Sax. bindan, gebindan, pret. band, bund, or bunden; Goth. bindan, gabindan; D. binden, verbinden; Ger. the same; Sw. binda, förbinda; Dan. binder, to bind, and bind, a band; also baand, a band; Hindu, bandna; Gypsy, bandopen; Pers. بَنْدَنْ bandan, and بَنْديدَنْ bandidan, to bind; the former signifies also, to apply, to bend the mind; and the latter, to shut, close, make fast. The sense is, to strain.]

  1. To tie together, or confine with a cord, or any thing that is flexible; to fasten as with a band, fillet or ligature.
  2. To gird, inwrap or involve; to confine by a wrapper, cover or bandage; sometimes with up; as, to bind up a wound.
  3. To confine or restrain, as with a chain, fetters or cord; as, bind him hand and foot.
  4. To restrain in any manner. He bindeth the floods from overflowing. – Job xxviii.
  5. To oblige by a promise, vow, stipulation, covenant, law, duty or any other moral tie; to engage; as, we are bound by the laws of kindness, of nature, of a state, &c. If a man shall swear an oath to bind his soul with a bond. – Numbers xxx.
  6. To confirm or ratify. Whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth, shall be bound in heaven. – Matth. xvi.
  7. To distress, trouble, or confine by infirmity. Whom Satan hath bound these eighteen years. – Luke xiii.
  8. To constrain by a powerful influence or persuasion. I go bound in the spirit to Jerusalem. – Acts xx.
  9. To restrain the natural discharges of the bowels; to make costive; as, certain kinds of food bind the body or bowels.
  10. To form a border; to fasten with a band, ribin, or any thing that strengthens the edges; as, to bind a garment or carpet.
  11. To cover with leather or any thing firm; to sew together and cover; as, to bind a book.
  12. To cover or secure by a band; as, to bind a wheel with tire.
  13. To oblige to serve, by contract; as, to bind an apprentice; often with out; as, to bind out a servant.
  14. To make hard or firm; as, certain substances bind the earth. The uses of this word are too various and numerous to be reduced to exact definitions. To bind to is to contract; as, to bind one's self to a wife. To bind over is to oblige by bond to appear at a court.

Bind
  1. To tie, or confine with a cord, band, ligature, chain, etc.; to fetter; to make fast; as, to bind grain in bundles; to bind a prisoner.
  2. To tie; to confine by any ligature.

    They that reap must sheaf and bind.
    Shak.

  3. That which binds or ties.
  4. To confine, restrain, or hold by physical force or influence of any kind; as, attraction binds the planets to the sun; frost binds the earth, or the streams.

    He bindeth the floods from overflowing.
    Job xxviii. 11.

    Whom Satan hath bound, lo, these eighteen years.
    Luke xiii. 16.

  5. To contract; to grow hard or stiff; to cohere or stick together in a mass; as, clay binds by heat.

    Mortimer.
  6. Any twining or climbing plant or stem, esp. a hop vine; a bine.
  7. To cover, as with a bandage; to bandage or dress; -- sometimes with up; as, to bind up a wound.
  8. To be restrained from motion, or from customary or natural action, as by friction.
  9. Indurated clay, when much mixed with the oxide of iron.

    Kirwan.
  10. To make fast ( a thing) about or upon something, as by tying; to encircle with something; as, to bind a belt about one; to bind a compress upon a part.
  11. To exert a binding or restraining influence.

    Locke.
  12. A ligature or tie for grouping notes.
  13. To prevent or restrain from customary or natural action; as, certain drugs bind the bowels.
  14. To protect or strengthen by a band or binding, as the edge of a carpet or garment.
  15. To sew or fasten together, and inclose in a cover; as, to bind a book.
  16. Fig.: To oblige, restrain, or hold, by authority, law, duty, promise, vow, affection, or other moral tie; as, to bind the conscience; to bind by kindness; bound by affection; commerce binds nations to each other.

    Who made our laws to bind us, not himself.
    Milton.

  17. To bring (any one) under definite legal obligations; esp. under the obligation of a bond or covenant.

    Abbott. (b)
1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Bind

BIND, verb transitive

1. To tie together, or confine with a cord, or any thing that is flexible; to fasten as with a band, fillet or ligature.

2. To gird, inwrap or involve; to confine by a wrapper, cover or bandage; sometimes with up; as, to bind up a wound.

3. To confine or restrain, as with a chain, fetters or cord; as, bind him hand and foot.

4. To restrain in any manner.

He bindeth the floods from overflowing. Job 28:11.

5. To oblige by a promise, vow, stipulation, covenant, law, duty or any other moral tie; to engage.

If a man shall swear an oath to bind his soul with a bond. Numbers 30:2.

We are bound by the laws of kindness, of nature, of a state, etc.

6. To confirm or ratify.

Whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth, shall be bound in heaven. Matthew 16:19.

7. To distress, trouble, or confine by infirmity.

Whom Satan hath bound these eighteen years. Luke 13:1.

8. To constrain by a powerful influence or persuasion.

I go bound in the spirit to Jerusalem. Acts 20:1.

9. To restrain the natural discharges of the bowels; to make costive; as, certain kinds of food bind the body or bowels.

10. To form a border; to fasten with a band, ribin, or any thing that strengthens the edges; as, to bind a garment or carpet.

11. To cover with leather or anything firm; to sew together and cover; as, to bind a book.

12. To cover or secure by a band; as, to bind a wheel with tire.

13. To oblige to serve, by contract; as, to bind an apprentice; often with out; as, to bind out a servant.

14. To make hard or firm; as, certain substances bind the earth.

To bind to is to contract; as, to bind one's self to a wife.

To bind over is to oblige by bond to appear at a court.

BIND, verb intransitive To contract; to grow hard or stiff; as, clay binds by heat.

1. To grow or become costive.

2. To be obligatory.

BIND, noun A stalk of hops, so called from its winding round a pole or tree, or being bound to it.

1. A bind of eels, is a quantity consisting of 10 strikes, each containing 25 eels, or 250 in the whole.

2. Among miners, indurated clay, when much mixed with the oxyd of iron.

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Because he used the bible to define words.

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Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

evenly

E'VENLY, adv. e'vnly. With an even, level or smooth surface; without roughness, elevations and depressions; as things evenly spread.

1. Equally; uniformly; in an equipoise; as evenly balanced.

2. In a level position; horizontally.

The surface of the sea is evenly distant from the center of the earth.

3. Impartially; without bias from favor or enmity.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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