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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [bell]

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bell

BELL, n.

1. A vessel or hollow body,used for making sounds. Its constituent parts are a barrel or hollow body, enlarged or expanded at one end, an ear or cannon by which it is hung to a beam, and a clapper on the inside. It is formed of a composition of metals. Bells are of high antiquity. The blue tunic of the Jewish High Priest was adorned with golden bells; and the kings of Persia are said to have the hem of their robe adorned with them in like manner. Among the Greeks, those who went the nightly rounds in camps or garrisons, used to ring a bell, at each sentinel-box, to see that the soldier on duty was awake. Bells were also put on the necks of criminals, to warn persons to move out of the way of so ill an omen, as the sight of a criminal or his executioner; also on the necks of beasts and birds, and in houses. In churches and other public buildings, bells are now used to notify the time of meeting of any congregation or other assembly.

In private houses, bells are used to call servants, either hung and moved by a wire, or as hand-bells. Small bells are also used in electrical experiments.

2. A hollow body of metal, perforated, and containing a solid ball, to give sounds when shaken; used on animals, as on horses or hawks.

3. Any thing in form of a bell, as the cup or calix of a flower.

To bear the bell, is to be the first or leader, in allusion to the bell-wether of a flock, or the leading horse of a team or drove, that wears bells on his collar.

To shake the bells, a phrase of Shakespeare, signifies to move, give notice or alarm.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bell]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BELL, n.

1. A vessel or hollow body,used for making sounds. Its constituent parts are a barrel or hollow body, enlarged or expanded at one end, an ear or cannon by which it is hung to a beam, and a clapper on the inside. It is formed of a composition of metals. Bells are of high antiquity. The blue tunic of the Jewish High Priest was adorned with golden bells; and the kings of Persia are said to have the hem of their robe adorned with them in like manner. Among the Greeks, those who went the nightly rounds in camps or garrisons, used to ring a bell, at each sentinel-box, to see that the soldier on duty was awake. Bells were also put on the necks of criminals, to warn persons to move out of the way of so ill an omen, as the sight of a criminal or his executioner; also on the necks of beasts and birds, and in houses. In churches and other public buildings, bells are now used to notify the time of meeting of any congregation or other assembly.

In private houses, bells are used to call servants, either hung and moved by a wire, or as hand-bells. Small bells are also used in electrical experiments.

2. A hollow body of metal, perforated, and containing a solid ball, to give sounds when shaken; used on animals, as on horses or hawks.

3. Any thing in form of a bell, as the cup or calix of a flower.

To bear the bell, is to be the first or leader, in allusion to the bell-wether of a flock, or the leading horse of a team or drove, that wears bells on his collar.

To shake the bells, a phrase of Shakespeare, signifies to move, give notice or alarm.


BELL, n. [Sax. bell, bella, belle, so named from its sound; Sax. bellan, to bawl or bellow; W. ballaw; G. bellen; D. id.; coinciding with βαλλω and pello. See Peal.]

  1. A vessel or hollow body, used for making sounds. Its constituent parts are a barrel or hollow body, enlarged or expanded at one end, an ear or cannon by which it is hung to a beam, and a clapper on the inside. It is formed of a composition of metals. Bells are of high antiquity. The blue tunic of the Jewish high-priest was adorned with golden bells; and the kings of Persia are said to have the hem of their robe adorned with them in like manner. Among the Greeks, those who went the nightly rounds in camps or garrisons, used to ring a bell, at each sentinel-box, to see that the soldier on duty was awake. Bells were also put on the necks of criminals, to warn persons to move out of the way of so ill an omen, as the sight of a criminal or his executioner; also on the necks of beasts and birds and in houses. In churches and other public buildings, bells are now used to notify the time of meeting of any congregation or other assembly. – Encyc. In private houses, bells are used to call servants, either hung and moved by a wire, or as hand-bells. Small bells are also used in electrical experiments.
  2. A hollow body of metal, perforated, and containing a solid ball, to give sounds when shaken; used on animals, as on horses or hawks.
  3. Any thing in form of a bell, as the cup or calyx of a flower. To bear the bell, is to be the first or leader, in allusion to the bell-wether of a flock, or the leading horse of a team or drove, that wears bells on his collar. To shake the bells, a phrase of Shakspeare, signifies to move, give notice or alarm.

BELL, v.i.

To grow in the form of bells, as buds or flowers.


Bell
  1. A hollow metallic vessel, usually shaped somewhat like a cup with a flaring mouth, containing a clapper or tongue, and giving forth a ringing sound on being struck.

    * Bells have been made of various metals, but the best have always been, as now, of an alloy of copper and tin.

    The Liberty Bell, the famous bell of the Philadelphia State House, which rang when the Continental Congress declared the Independence of the United States, in 1776. It had been cast in 1753, and upon it were the words "Proclaim liberty throughout all the land, to all the inhabitants thereof."

  2. To make bell-mouthed; as, to bell a tube.
  3. To develop bells or corollas; to take the form of a bell; to blossom; as, hops bell.
  4. To utter by bellowing.

    [Obs.]
  5. To call or bellow, as the deer in rutting time; to make a bellowing sound; to roar.

    As loud as belleth wind in hell.
    Chaucer.

    The wild buck bells from ferny brake.
    Sir W. Scott.

  6. A hollow perforated sphere of metal containing a loose ball which causes it to sound when moved.
  7. Anything in the form of a bell, as the cup or corol of a flower.

    "In a cowslip's bell I lie." Shak.
  8. That part of the capital of a column included between the abacus and neck molding; also used for the naked core of nearly cylindrical shape, assumed to exist within the leafage of a capital.
  9. The strikes of the bell which mark the time; or the time so designated.

    * On shipboard, time is marked by a bell, which is struck eight times at 4, 8, and 12 o'clock. Half an hour after it has struck "eight bells" it is struck once, and at every succeeding half hour the number of strokes is increased by one, till at the end of the four hours, which constitute a watch, it is struck eight times.

    To bear away the bell, to win the prize at a race where the prize was a bell; hence, to be superior in something. Fuller. -- To bear the bell, to be the first or leader; -- in allusion to the bellwether or a flock, or the leading animal of a team or drove, when wearing a bell. -- To curse by bell, book, and candle, a solemn form of excommunication used in the Roman Catholic church, the bell being tolled, the book of offices for the purpose being used, and three candles being extinguished with certain ceremonies. Nares. -- To lose the bell, to be worsted in a contest. "In single fight he lost the bell." Fairfax. -- To shake the bells, to move, give notice, or alarm. Shak.

    * Bell is much used adjectively or in combinations; as, bell clapper; bell foundry; bell hanger; bell- mouthed; bell tower, etc., which, for the most part, are self- explaining.

    Bell arch (Arch.), an arch of unusual form, following the curve of an ogee. -- Bell cage, or Bell carriage (Arch.), a timber frame constructed to carry one or more large bells. -- Bell cot (Arch.), a small or subsidiary construction, frequently corbeled out from the walls of a structure, and used to contain and support one or more bells. -- Bell deck (Arch.), the floor of a belfry made to serve as a roof to the rooms below. -- Bell founder, one whose occupation it is to found or cast bells. -- Bell foundry, or Bell foundery, a place where bells are founded or cast. -- Bell gable (Arch.), a small gable-shaped construction, pierced with one or more openings, and used to contain bells. -- Bell glass. See Bell jar. -- Bell hanger, a man who hangs or puts up bells. -- Bell pull, a cord, handle, or knob, connecting with a bell or bell wire, and which will ring the bell when pulled. Aytoun. -- Bell punch, a kind of conductor's punch which rings a bell when used. -- Bell ringer, one who rings a bell or bells, esp. one whose business it is to ring a church bell or chime, or a set of musical bells for public entertainment. -- Bell roof (Arch.), a roof shaped according to the general lines of a bell. -- Bell rope, a rope by which a church or other bell is rung. -- Bell tent, a circular conical-topped tent. -- Bell trap, a kind of bell shaped stench trap.

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Bell

BELL, noun

1. A vessel or hollow body, used for making sounds. Its constituent parts are a barrel or hollow body, enlarged or expanded at one end, an ear or cannon by which it is hung to a beam, and a clapper on the inside. It is formed of a composition of metals. Bells are of high antiquity. The blue tunic of the Jewish High Priest was adorned with golden bells; and the kings of Persia are said to have the hem of their robe adorned with them in like manner. Among the Greeks, those who went the nightly rounds in camps or garrisons, used to ring a bell at each sentinel-box, to see that the soldier on duty was awake. Bells were also put on the necks of criminals, to warn persons to move out of the way of so ill an omen, as the sight of a criminal or his executioner; also on the necks of beasts and birds, and in houses. In churches and other public buildings, bells are now used to notify the time of meeting of any congregation or other assembly.

In private houses, bells are used to call servants, either hung and moved by a wire, or as hand-bells. Small bells are also used in electrical experiments.

2. A hollow body of metal, perforated, and containing a solid ball, to give sounds when shaken; used on animals, as on horses or hawks.

3. Any thing in form of a bell as the cup or calix of a flower.

To bear the bell is to be the first or leader, in allusion to the bell-wether of a flock, or the leading horse of a team or drove, that wears bells on his collar.

To shake the bells, a phrase of Shakespeare, signifies to move, give notice or alarm.

BELL, verb intransitive To grow in the form of bells, as buds or flowers.

BELL'-FASHIONED, adjective Having the form of a bell

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As an auther of spiritual material, I use it frequently to verify meanings and spelling

— Rock (Hartland, MN)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

obtrusive

OBTRU'SIVE, a. Disposed to obtrude any thing upon others; inclined to intrude or thrust one's self among others, or to enter uninvited.

Not obvious, not obtrusive, but retired, the more desirable.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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