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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [bay]

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bay

BAY, a. [L.badius. Blass Bd.] Red, or reddish, inclining to a chestnut color; applied to the color of horses. The shades of this color are called light bay, dark bay, dappled bay, gilded bay, chestnut bay. In popular language, in England, all bay horses are called brown.

BAY, n.

1. An arm of the sea, extending into the land, not of any definite form, but smaller than a gulf, and larger than a creek. The name,however, is not used with much precision, and is often applied to large tracts of water, around which the land forms a curve, as Hudson's Bay. Nor is the name restricted to tracts of water with a narrow entrance, but used for any recess or inlet between capes of head lands, as the bay of Biscay.

2. A pond-head,or a pond formed by a dam, for the purpose of driving mill-wheels. [ I believe not used in U.S.]

3. In a barn, a place between the floor and the end of the building, or a low inclosed place, for depositing hay.

In England, says Johnson, if a barn consists of a floor and two heads, where they lay corn, they call it a barn of two bays. These bays are from 14 to 20 feet long, and floors from 10 to 12 feet broad, and usually 20 feet long, which is the breadth of the barn.

4. In ships of war, that part on each side between decks which lies between the bitts.

5. Any kind of opening in walls.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bay]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BAY, a. [L.badius. Blass Bd.] Red, or reddish, inclining to a chestnut color; applied to the color of horses. The shades of this color are called light bay, dark bay, dappled bay, gilded bay, chestnut bay. In popular language, in England, all bay horses are called brown.

BAY, n.

1. An arm of the sea, extending into the land, not of any definite form, but smaller than a gulf, and larger than a creek. The name,however, is not used with much precision, and is often applied to large tracts of water, around which the land forms a curve, as Hudson's Bay. Nor is the name restricted to tracts of water with a narrow entrance, but used for any recess or inlet between capes of head lands, as the bay of Biscay.

2. A pond-head,or a pond formed by a dam, for the purpose of driving mill-wheels. [ I believe not used in U.S.]

3. In a barn, a place between the floor and the end of the building, or a low inclosed place, for depositing hay.

In England, says Johnson, if a barn consists of a floor and two heads, where they lay corn, they call it a barn of two bays. These bays are from 14 to 20 feet long, and floors from 10 to 12 feet broad, and usually 20 feet long, which is the breadth of the barn.

4. In ships of war, that part on each side between decks which lies between the bitts.

5. Any kind of opening in walls.

BAY, a. [Fr. bai or baie; It. baio; Sp. bayo; L. badius. Class Bd.]

Red, or reddish, inclining to a chestnut color; applied to the color of horses. The shades of this color are called light bay, dark bay, dappled bay, gilded bay, chestnut bay. In popular language, in England, all bay horses are called brown. – Johnson. Encyc.


BAY, n.1 [Fr. baie; Sp. and Port. bahia; It. baia; D. baai; contracted from the root of Sax. byge, an angle, bygan, D. boogen, to bend, whence bow.]

  1. An arm of the sea, extending into the land, not of any definite form, but smaller than a gulf, and larger than a creek. The name however is not used with much precision, and is often applied to large tracts of water, around which the land forms a curve, as Hudson's Bay. Nor is the name restricted to tracts of water with a narrow entrance, but used for any recess or inlet between capes or head lands, as the Bay of Biscay.
  2. A pond-head, or a pond formed by a dam for the purpose of driving mill-wheels. [I believe not used in the United States.]
  3. In a barn, a place between the floor and the end of the building, or a low inclosed place for depositing hay. In England, says Johnson, if a barn consists of a floor and two heads, where they lay corn, they call it a barn of two bays. These bays are from 14 to 20 feet long, and floors from 10 to 12 feet broad, and usually 20 feet long, which is the breadth of the barn. – Builder's Dict.
  4. In ships of war, that part on each side between decks which lies between the bitts. – Mar. Dict.
  5. Any kind of opening in walls. – Chambers.

BAY, n.2 [Qu. Gr. βαιον, a branch of the palm tree. In Sp. baya is a berry, the fruit of the laurel.]

  1. The laurel tree. Hence,
  2. Bays, in the plural, an honorary garland or crown, bestowed as a prize for victory or excellence, anciently made or consisting of branches of the laurel. The patriot's honors, and the poet's bays. – Trumbull.
  3. In some parts of the United States, a tract of land covered with bay trees. – Drayton, S. Carolina.

BAY, n.3 [Goth. beidan, to expect; It. bada; “tenere a bada,” to keep at bay; “star a bada,” to stand trifling; badare, to stand trifling; to amuse one's self, to take care, to watch, to covet; abbadare, to mind; Fr. bayer, to gape or stand gaping. Qu. aboyer.]

A state of expectation, watching or looking for; as, to keep a man at bay. So a stag at bay, is when he turns his head against the dogs. Whence abeyance, in law, or a state of expectancy.


BAY, v.i. [Fr. aboyer; It. baiare, to bark.]

  1. To bark, as a dog at his game. – Spenser.
  2. To encompass, or inclose, from bay. We now use embay. – Shak.

BAY, v.t.

To bark at; to follow with barking. – Shak.


Bay
  1. Reddish brown; of the color of a chestnut; -- applied to the color of horses.

    Bay cat (Zoöl.), a wild cat of Africa and the East Indies (Felis aurata). -- Bay lynx (Zoöl.), the common American lynx (Felis, or Lynx, rufa).

  2. An inlet of the sea, usually smaller than a gulf, but of the same general character.

    * The name is not used with much precision, and is often applied to large tracts of water, around which the land forms a curve; as, Hudson's Bay. The name is not restricted to tracts of water with a narrow entrance, but is used for any recess or inlet between capes or headlands; as, the Bay of Biscay.

  3. A berry, particularly of the laurel.

    [Obs.]
  4. To bark, as a dog with a deep voice does, at his game.

    The hounds at nearer distance hoarsely bayed.
    Dryden.

  5. To bark at; hence, to follow with barking; to bring or drive to bay; as, to bay the bear.

    Shak.
  6. Deep-toned, prolonged barking.

    "The bay of curs." Cowper.
  7. To bathe.

    [Obs.] Spenser.
  8. A bank or dam to keep back water.
  9. To dam, as water; -- with up or back.
  10. A small body of water set off from the main body; as a compartment containing water for a wheel; the portion of a canal just outside of the gates of a lock, etc.
  11. The laurel tree (Laurus nobilis). Hence, in the plural, an honorary garland or crown bestowed as a prize for victory or excellence, anciently made or consisting of branches of the laurel.

    The patriot's honors and the poet's bays.
    Trumbull.

  12. A state of being obliged to face an antagonist or a difficulty, when escape has become impossible.

    Embolden'd by despair, he stood at bay.
    Dryden.

    The most terrible evils are just kept at bay by incessant efforts.
    I. Taylor

  13. A recess or indentation shaped like a bay.
  14. A tract covered with bay trees.

    [Local, U. S.]

    Bay leaf, the leaf of the bay tree (Laurus nobilis). It has a fragrant odor and an aromatic taste.

  15. A principal compartment of the walls, roof, or other part of a building, or of the whole building, as marked off by the buttresses, vaulting, mullions of a window, etc.; one of the main divisions of any structure, as the part of a bridge between two piers.
  16. A compartment in a barn, for depositing hay, or grain in the stalks.
  17. A kind of mahogany obtained from Campeachy Bay.

    Sick bay, in vessels of war, that part of a deck appropriated to the use of the sick. Totten.

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Bay

BAY, adjective [Latin badius. Blass Bd.] Red, or reddish, inclining to a chestnut color; applied to the color of horses. The shades of this color are called light bay dark bay dappled bay gilded bay chestnut bay In popular language, in England, all bay horses are called brown.

BAY, noun

1. An arm of the sea, extending into the land, not of any definite form, but smaller than a gulf, and larger than a creek. The name, however, is not used with much precision, and is often applied to large tracts of water, around which the land forms a curve, as Hudson's bay Nor is the name restricted to tracts of water with a narrow entrance, but used for any recess or inlet between capes of head lands, as the bay of Biscay.

2. A pond-head, or a pond formed by a dam, for the purpose of driving mill-wheels. [ I believe not used in U.S.]

3. In a barn, a place between the floor and the end of the building, or a low inclosed place, for depositing hay.

In England, says Johnson, if a barn consists of a floor and two heads, where they lay corn, they call it a barn of two bays. These bays are from 14 to 20 feet long, and floors from 10 to 12 feet broad, and usually 20 feet long, which is the breadth of the barn.

4. In ships of war, that part on each side between decks which lies between the bitts.

5. Any kind of opening in walls.

BAY, noun [Gr. a branch of the palm tree.]

1. The laurel tree, Hence,

2. Bays, in the plural, an honorary garland or crown, bestowed as a prize for victory or excellence, anciently made or consisting of branches of the laurel.

The patriot's honors, and the poet's bays.

3. In some parts of the U.States, a tract of land covered with bay trees.

BAY, noun A state of expectation, watching or looking for; as, to keep a man at bay So a stag at bay is when he turns his head against the dogs. Whence abeyance, in law, or a state of expectancy.

BAY, verb intransitive

1. To bark, as a dog at his game.

2. To encompass, or inclose, from bay We now use embay.

BAY, verb transitive To bark at; to follow with barking.

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importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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CONTROVERTIST, n. One who controverts; a disputant; a man versed or engaged in controversy, or disputation.

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