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Thursday - April 18, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [bat]

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bat

BAT, n.

1. A heavy stick or club; a piece of wood with one end thicker or broader than the other.

2. Bat or bate, a small copper coin of Germany, with a small mixture of silver, worth four crutzers. Also a coin of Switzerland, worth five livres.

3. A term given by miners to shale or bituminous shale.

BAT, v.i. To manage a bat, or play with one.

BAT, n. [I have not found this word in any European language, except in English.]

A race of quadrupeds, technically called Vespertilio, of the order primates, in Linne's system. The fore feet have the toes connected by a membrane, expanded into a kind of wings, by means of which the animals fly. The species are numerous. Of these, the vampire or Ternate bat inhabits Africa and the Oriental Isles. These animals fly in flocks from isle to isle, obscuring the sun by their numbers. Their wings when extended measure five or six feet. They live on fruits; but are said sometimes to draw blood from persons when asleep. The bats of the northern latitudes are small; they are viviparous and suckle their young. Their skin resembles that of a mouse. They enter houses in pleasant summer evenings, feed upon moths, flies, flesh, and oily substances, and are torpid during the winter.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bat]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BAT, n.

1. A heavy stick or club; a piece of wood with one end thicker or broader than the other.

2. Bat or bate, a small copper coin of Germany, with a small mixture of silver, worth four crutzers. Also a coin of Switzerland, worth five livres.

3. A term given by miners to shale or bituminous shale.

BAT, v.i. To manage a bat, or play with one.

BAT, n. [I have not found this word in any European language, except in English.]

A race of quadrupeds, technically called Vespertilio, of the order primates, in Linne's system. The fore feet have the toes connected by a membrane, expanded into a kind of wings, by means of which the animals fly. The species are numerous. Of these, the vampire or Ternate bat inhabits Africa and the Oriental Isles. These animals fly in flocks from isle to isle, obscuring the sun by their numbers. Their wings when extended measure five or six feet. They live on fruits; but are said sometimes to draw blood from persons when asleep. The bats of the northern latitudes are small; they are viviparous and suckle their young. Their skin resembles that of a mouse. They enter houses in pleasant summer evenings, feed upon moths, flies, flesh, and oily substances, and are torpid during the winter.


BAT, n.1 [Sax. bat; Ir. bat, bata; Russ. bot; allied to beat.]

  1. A heavy stick or club; a piece of wood with one end thicker or broader than the other.
  2. Bat or bate, a small copper coin of Germany, with a small mixture of silver, worth four crutzers. Also a coin of Switzerland, worth five livres. – Encyc.
  3. A term given by miners to shale or bituminous shale. – Kirwan.
  4. A mass of cotton prepared for filling quilts or comfortables.

BAT, n.2 [Rab. and Tal. באות, באתא, or בואת. Buxtorf. I have not found this word in any European language, except in English.]

A race of quadrupeds, technically called Vespertilio, of the order Primates, in Linnæus's system. The fore feet have the toes connected by a membrane, expanded into a kind of wings, by means of which the animals fly. The species are numerous. Of these the vampire or Ternate bat inhabits Africa and the Oriental Isles. These animals fly in flocks from isle to isle, obscuring the sun by their numbers. Their wings when extended measure five or six feet. They live on fruits; but are said sometimes to draw blood from persons when asleep. The bats of the northern latitudes are small; they are viviparous and suckle their young. Their skin resembles that of a mouse. They enter houses in pleasant summer evenings, feed upon moths, flies, flesh, and oily substances, and are torpid during the winter. – Encyc.


BAT, v.i.

To manage a bat, or play with one. – Mason.


Bat
  1. A large stick; a club; specifically, a piece of wood with one end thicker or broader than the other, used in playing baseball, cricket, etc.
  2. To strike or hit with a bat or a pole] to cudgel; to beat.

    Holland.
  3. To use a bat, as in a game of baseball.
  4. One of the Cheiroptera, an order of flying mammals, in which the wings are formed by a membrane stretched between the elongated fingers, legs, and tail. The common bats are small and insectivorous. See Cheiroptera and Vampire.

    Silent bats in drowsy clusters cling. Goldsmith.

    Bat tick (Zoöl.), a wingless, dipterous insect of the genus Nycteribia, parasitic on bats.

  5. Same as Tical, n., 1.
  6. To bate or flutter, as a hawk.

    [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
  7. In badminton, tennis, and similar games, a racket.
  8. Shale or bituminous shale.

    Kirwan.
  9. To wink.

    [Local, U. S. & Prov Eng.]
  10. A stroke] a sharp blow.

    [Colloq. or Slang]
  11. A sheet of cotton used for filling quilts or comfortables; batting.
  12. A stroke of work.

    [Scot. *** Prov. Eng.]
  13. A part of a brick with one whole end.

    Bat bolt (Machinery), a bolt barbed or jagged at its butt or tang to make it hold the more firmly. Knight.

  14. Rate of motion] speed.

    [Colloq.] "A vast host of fowl . . . making at full bat for the North Sea." Pall Mall Mag.
  15. A spree; a jollification.

    [Slang, U. S.]
  16. Manner; rate; condition; state of health.

    [Scot. *** Prov. Eng.]
1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

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Bat

BAT, noun

1. A heavy stick or club; a piece of wood with one end thicker or broader than the other.

2. bat or bate, a small copper coin of Germany, with a small mixture of silver, worth four crutzers. Also a coin of Switzerland, worth five livres.

3. A term given by miners to shale or bituminous shale.

BAT, verb intransitive To manage a bat or play with one.

BAT, noun [I have not found this word in any European language, except in English.]

A race of quadrupeds, technically called Vespertilio, of the order primates, in Linne's system. The fore feet have the toes connected by a membrane, expanded into a kind of wings, by means of which the animals fly. The species are numerous. Of these, the vampire or Ternate bat inhabits Africa and the Oriental Isles. These animals fly in flocks from isle to isle, obscuring the sun by their numbers. Their wings when extended measure five or six feet. They live on fruits; but are said sometimes to draw blood from persons when asleep. The bats of the northern latitudes are small; they are viviparous and suckle their young. Their skin resembles that of a mouse. They enter houses in pleasant summer evenings, feed upon moths, flies, flesh, and oily substances, and are torpid during the winter.

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The connection to the Bible.

— Steve (Conyers, GA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

suburbed

SUB'URBED, a. Bordering on a suburb; having a suburb on its out part.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary

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