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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [base]

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base

BASE, a.

1. Low in place. Obs.

2. Mean; vile; worthless; that is, low in value or estimation; used of things.

3. Of low station; of mean account; without rank, dignity or estimation among men; used of persons.

The base shall behave proudly against the honorable. Is.iii.

4. Of mean spirit; disingenuous; illiberal; low; without dignity of sentiment; as a base and abject multitude.

5. Of little comparative value; applied to metals, and perhaps to all metals, except gold and silver.

6. Deep; grave; applied to sounds; as the base sounds of a viol.

7. Of illegitimate birth; born out of wedlock.

8. Not held by honorable tenure. A base estate is an estate held by services not honorable,not in capite, or by villenage. Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant, a base tenant. So writers on the laws of England use the terms, a base fee, a base court.

48

Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant, a base tenant. So writers on the laws of England use the terms, a base fee, a base court.

BASE, n. [L. basis; that which is set, the foundation or bottom.]

1. The bottom of any thing, considered as its support or the part of a thing on which it stands or rests; as the base of a column, the pedestal of a statue, the foundation of a house,&c.

In architecture, the base of a pillar properly is that part which is between the top of a pedestal and the bottom of the shaft; but when there is no pedestal, it is the part between the bottom of the column and the plinth. Usually it consists of certain spires or circles. The pedestal also has its base.

2. In fortification, the exterior side of the polygon, or that imaginary line which is drawn from the flanked angle of a bastion to the angle opposite to it.

3. In gunnery, the least sort of ordnance, the diameter of whose bore is l 1/4 inch.

4. The part of any ornament which hangs down, as housings.

5. The broad part of any thing, as the bottom of a cone.

6. In old authors, stockings; armor for the legs.

7. The place from which racers or tilters start; the bottom of the field; the carcer or starting post.

8. The lowest or gravest part in music; improperly written bass.

9. A rustic play, called also bays, or prison bars.

10. In geometry, the lowest side of the perimeter of a figure. Any side of a triangle may be called its base, but this term most properly belongs to the side which is parallel to the horizon. In rectangled triangles, the base, properly, is the side opposite to the right angle. The base of a solid figure is that on which it stands. The base of a conic section is a right line in the hyperbola and parabola, arising from the common intersection of the secant plane and the base of the cone.

11. In chimistry, any body which is dissolved by another body, which it receives and fixes. Thus any alkaline, earthy or metallic substance, combining with an acid, forms a compound or neutral salt, of which it is the base. Such salts are called salts with alkaline, earthy or metallic bases.

12. Thorough base, in music, is the part performed with base viols or theorbos, while the voices sing and other instruments perform their parts, or during the intervals when the other parts stop. It is distinguished by figures over the notes.

Counter base is a second or double base, when there are several in the same concert.

BASE, v.t. To embase; to reduce the value by the admixture of meaner metals. [Little used.]

2. To found; to lay the base or foundation.

To base and build the commonwealth of man.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [base]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BASE, a.

1. Low in place. Obs.

2. Mean; vile; worthless; that is, low in value or estimation; used of things.

3. Of low station; of mean account; without rank, dignity or estimation among men; used of persons.

The base shall behave proudly against the honorable. Is.iii.

4. Of mean spirit; disingenuous; illiberal; low; without dignity of sentiment; as a base and abject multitude.

5. Of little comparative value; applied to metals, and perhaps to all metals, except gold and silver.

6. Deep; grave; applied to sounds; as the base sounds of a viol.

7. Of illegitimate birth; born out of wedlock.

8. Not held by honorable tenure. A base estate is an estate held by services not honorable,not in capite, or by villenage. Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant, a base tenant. So writers on the laws of England use the terms, a base fee, a base court.

48

Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant, a base tenant. So writers on the laws of England use the terms, a base fee, a base court.

BASE, n. [L. basis; that which is set, the foundation or bottom.]

1. The bottom of any thing, considered as its support or the part of a thing on which it stands or rests; as the base of a column, the pedestal of a statue, the foundation of a house,&c.

In architecture, the base of a pillar properly is that part which is between the top of a pedestal and the bottom of the shaft; but when there is no pedestal, it is the part between the bottom of the column and the plinth. Usually it consists of certain spires or circles. The pedestal also has its base.

2. In fortification, the exterior side of the polygon, or that imaginary line which is drawn from the flanked angle of a bastion to the angle opposite to it.

3. In gunnery, the least sort of ordnance, the diameter of whose bore is l 1/4 inch.

4. The part of any ornament which hangs down, as housings.

5. The broad part of any thing, as the bottom of a cone.

6. In old authors, stockings; armor for the legs.

7. The place from which racers or tilters start; the bottom of the field; the carcer or starting post.

8. The lowest or gravest part in music; improperly written bass.

9. A rustic play, called also bays, or prison bars.

10. In geometry, the lowest side of the perimeter of a figure. Any side of a triangle may be called its base, but this term most properly belongs to the side which is parallel to the horizon. In rectangled triangles, the base, properly, is the side opposite to the right angle. The base of a solid figure is that on which it stands. The base of a conic section is a right line in the hyperbola and parabola, arising from the common intersection of the secant plane and the base of the cone.

11. In chimistry, any body which is dissolved by another body, which it receives and fixes. Thus any alkaline, earthy or metallic substance, combining with an acid, forms a compound or neutral salt, of which it is the base. Such salts are called salts with alkaline, earthy or metallic bases.

12. Thorough base, in music, is the part performed with base viols or theorbos, while the voices sing and other instruments perform their parts, or during the intervals when the other parts stop. It is distinguished by figures over the notes.

Counter base is a second or double base, when there are several in the same concert.

BASE, v.t. To embase; to reduce the value by the admixture of meaner metals. [Little used.]

2. To found; to lay the base or foundation.

To base and build the commonwealth of man.

BASE, a. [Fr. bas, low; W. bas; It. basso; Sp. baxo, low; W. basu, to fall, or lower. See Abase.]

  1. Low in place. [Obs.] – Spenser.
  2. Mean; vile; worthless; that is, low in value or estimation; used of things.
  3. Of low station; of mean account; without rank, dignity or estimation among men; used of persons. The base shall behave proudly against the honorable. Is. iii.
  4. Of mean spirit; disingenuous; illiberal; low; without dignity of sentiment; as, a base and abject multitude.
  5. Of little comparative value; applied to metals, and perhaps to all metals, except gold and silver.
  6. Deep; grave; applied to sounds; as, the base sounds of a viol. – Bacon.
  7. Of illegitimate birth; born out of wedlock. – Shak.
  8. Not held by honorable tenure. A base estate is an estate held by services not honorable, nor in capite, or by villenage. Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant, a base tenant. So writers on the laws of England use the terms, a base fee, a base court. – Encyc.

BASE, n. [Gr. βασις; L. basis; It. basa, base; Sp. basa; Fr. base; that which is set, the foundation or bottom.]

  1. The bottom of any thing, considered as its support or the part of a thing on which it stands or rests; as, the base of a column, the pedestal of a statue, the foundation of a house, &c. In architecture, the base of a pillar properly, is that part which is between the top of a pedestal and the bottom of the shaft; but when there is no pedestal, it is the part between the bottom of the column and the plinth. Usually it consists of certain spires or circles. The pedestal also has its base. – Encyc.
  2. In fortification, the exterior side of the polygon, or that imaginary line which is drawn from the flanked angle of a bastion to the angle opposite to it.
  3. In gunnery, the least sort of ordnance, the diameter of whose bore is 1 1/4 inch. – Encyc.
  4. The part of any ornament which hangs down; as housings. – Sidney.
  5. The broad part of any thing, as the bottom of a cone.
  6. In old authors, stockings; armor for the legs. – Hudibras.
  7. The place from which racers or tilters start; the bottom of the field; the career or starting post. – Dryden.
  8. The lowest or gravest part in music; improperly written bass.
  9. A rustic play, called also bays, or prison bars. – Shak.
  10. In geometry, the lowest side of the perimeter of a figure. Any side of a triangle may be called its base, but this term most properly belongs to the side which is parallel to the horizon. In rectangled triangles, the base, properly, is the side opposite to the right angle. The base of a solid figure is that on which it stands. The base of a conic section is a right line in the hyperbola and parabola, arising from the common intersection of the secant plane and the base of the cone. – Encyc.
  11. In chimistry, the electro-positive ingredient in a compound. Thus any alkaline or earthy substance, combining with an acid, forms a compound or salt, of which it is the base. Such salts, are called salts with alkaline or earthy bases.
  12. Thorough base, in music, is the part performed with base viols or theorbos, while the voices sing and other instruments perform their parts, or during the intervals when the other parts stop. It is distinguished by figures over the notes.
  13. Counter base is a second or double base, when there are several in the same concert. – Encyc.
  14. In botany, the base of the fruit is the part where it is united with the peduncle. – Lindley.

BASE, v.t.

  1. To embase; to reduce the value by the admixture of meaner metals. [Little used.] – Bacon.
  2. To found; to lay the base or foundation. To base and build the commonwealth of man. – Columbiad.

Base
  1. Of little, or less than the usual, height; of low growth; as, base shrubs.

    [Archaic] Shak.
  2. The bottom of anything, considered as its support, or that on which something rests for support; the foundation; as, the base of a statue.

    "The base of mighty mountains." Prescott.
  3. To put on a base or basis] to lay the foundation of; to found, as an argument or conclusion; -- used with on or upon.

    Bacon.
  4. To abase; to let, or cast, down; to lower.

    [Obs.]

    If any . . . based his pike.
    Sir T. North.

  5. Low in place or position.

    [Obs.] Shak.
  6. Fig.: The fundamental or essential part of a thing; the essential principle; a groundwork.
  7. To reduce the value of; to debase.

    [Obs.]

    Metals which we can not base.
    Bacon.

  8. Of humble birth; or low degree; lowly; mean.

    [Archaic] "A peasant and base swain." Bacon.
  9. The lower part of a wall, pier, or column, when treated as a separate feature, usually in projection, or especially ornamented.

    (b)
  10. Illegitimate by birth; bastard.

    [Archaic]

    Why bastard? wherefore base?
    Shak.

  11. That extremity of a leaf, fruit, etc., at which it is attached to its support.

  12. Of little comparative value, as metal inferior to gold and silver, the precious metals.
  13. The positive, or non-acid component of a salt; a substance which, combined with an acid, neutralizes the latter and forms a salt; -- applied also to the hydroxides of the positive elements or radicals, and to certain organic bodies resembling them in their property of forming salts with acids.
  14. Alloyed with inferior metal; debased; as, base coin; base bullion.
  15. The chief ingredient in a compound.
  16. Morally low. Hence: Low-minded; unworthy; without dignity of sentiment; ignoble; mean; illiberal; menial; as, a base fellow; base motives; base occupations.

    "A cruel act of a base and a cowardish mind." Robynson (More's Utopia). "Base ingratitude." Milton.
  17. A substance used as a mordant.

    Ure.
  18. Not classical or correct.

    "Base Latin." Fuller.
  19. The exterior side of the polygon, or that imaginary line which connects the salient angles of two adjacent bastions.
  20. Deep or grave in sound; as, the base tone of a violin.

    [In this sense, commonly written bass.]
  21. The line or surface constituting that part of a figure on which it is supposed to stand.
  22. Not held by honorable service; as, a base estate, one held by services not honorable; held by villenage. Such a tenure is called base, or low, and the tenant, a base tenant.

    Base fee, formerly, an estate held at the will of the lord; now, a qualified fee. See note under Fee, n., 4. -- Base metal. See under Metal.

    Syn. -- Dishonorable; worthless; ignoble; low-minded; infamous; sordid; degraded. -- Base, Vile, Mean. These words, as expressing moral qualities, are here arranged in the order of their strength, the strongest being placed first. Base marks a high degree of moral turpitude; vile and mean denote, in different degrees, the want of what is valuable or worthy of esteem. What is base excites our abhorrence; what is vile provokes our disgust or indignation; what is mean awakens contempt. Base is opposed to high-minded; vile, to noble; mean, to liberal or generous. Ingratitude is base; sycophancy is vile; undue compliances are mean.

  23. The number from which a mathematical table is constructed; as, the base of a system of logarithms.
  24. A low, or deep, sound. (Mus.) (a) The lowest part; the deepest male voice. (b) One who sings, or the instrument which plays, base.

    [Now commonly written bass.]

    The trebles squeak for fear, the bases roar.
    Dryden.

  25. A place or tract of country, protected by fortifications, or by natural advantages, from which the operations of an army proceed, forward movements are made, supplies are furnished, etc.
  26. The smallest kind of cannon.

    [Obs.]
  27. That part of an organ by which it is attached to another more central organ.
  28. The basal plane of a crystal.
  29. The ground mass of a rock, especially if not distinctly crystalline.
  30. The lower part of the field. See Escutcheon.
  31. The housing of a horse.

    [Obs.]
  32. A kind of skirt (often of velvet or brocade, but sometimes of mailed armor) which hung from the middle to about the knees, or lower.

    [Obs.]
  33. The lower part of a robe or petticoat.

    [Obs.]
  34. An apron.

    [Obs.] "Bakers in their linen bases." Marston.
  35. The point or line from which a start is made; a starting place or a goal in various games.

    To their appointed base they went.
    Dryden.

  36. A line in a survey which, being accurately determined in length and position, serves as the origin from which to compute the distances and positions of any points or objects connected with it by a system of triangles.

    Lyman.
  37. A rustic play; -- called also prisoner's base, prison base, or bars.

    "To run the country base." Shak.
  38. Any one of the four bounds which mark the circuit of the infield.

    Altern base. See under Altern. -- Attic base. (Arch.) See under Attic. -- Base course. (Arch.) (a) The first or lower course of a foundation wall, made of large stones or a mass of concrete; -- called also foundation course. (b) The architectural member forming the transition between the basement and the wall above. -- Base hit (Baseball), a hit, by which the batsman, without any error on the part of his opponents, is able to reach the first base without being put out. -- Base line. (a) A main line taken as a base, as in surveying or in military operations. (b) A line traced round a cannon at the rear of the vent. -- Base plate, the foundation plate of heavy machinery, as of the steam engine; the bed plate. -- Base ring (Ordnance), a projecting band of metal around the breech, connected with the body of the gun by a concave molding. H. L. Scott.

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Base

BASE, adjective

1. Low in place. obsolete

2. Mean; vile; worthless; that is, low in value or estimation; used of things.

3. Of low station; of mean account; without rank, dignity or estimation among men; used of persons.

The base shall behave proudly against the honorable. Isaiah 3:5.

4. Of mean spirit; disingenuous; illiberal; low; without dignity of sentiment; as a base and abject multitude.

5. Of little comparative value; applied to metals, and perhaps to all metals, except gold and silver.

6. Deep; grave; applied to sounds; as the base sounds of a viol.

7. Of illegitimate birth; born out of wedlock.

8. Not held by honorable tenure. A base estate is an estate held by services not honorable, not in capite, or by villenage. Such a tenure is called base or low, and the tenant, a base tenant. So writers on the laws of England use the terms, a base fee, a base court.

Such a tenure is called base or low, and the tenant, a base tenant. So writers on the laws of England use the terms, a base fee, a base court.

BASE, noun [Latin basis; that which is set, the foundation or bottom.]

1. The bottom of any thing, considered as its support or the part of a thing on which it stands or rests; as the base of a column, the pedestal of a statue, the foundation of a house, etc.

In architecture, the base of a pillar properly is that part which is between the top of a pedestal and the bottom of the shaft; but when there is no pedestal, it is the part between the bottom of the column and the plinth. Usually it consists of certain spires or circles. The pedestal also has its base

2. In fortification, the exterior side of the polygon, or that imaginary line which is drawn from the flanked angle of a bastion to the angle opposite to it.

3. In gunnery, the least sort of ordnance, the diameter of whose bore is l 1/4 inch.

4. The part of any ornament which hangs down, as housings.

5. The broad part of any thing, as the bottom of a cone.

6. In old authors, stockings; armor for the legs.

7. The place from which racers or tilters start; the bottom of the field; the carcer or starting post.

8. The lowest or gravest part in music; improperly written bass.

9. A rustic play, called also bays, or prison bars.

10. In geometry, the lowest side of the perimeter of a figure. Any side of a triangle may be called its base but this term most properly belongs to the side which is parallel to the horizon. In rectangled triangles, the base properly, is the side opposite to the right angle. The base of a solid figure is that on which it stands. The base of a conic section is a right line in the hyperbola and parabola, arising from the common intersection of the secant plane and the base of the cone.

11. In chimistry, any body which is dissolved by another body, which it receives and fixes. Thus any alkaline, earthy or metallic substance, combining with an acid, forms a compound or neutral salt, of which it is the base Such salts are called salts with alkaline, earthy or metallic bases.

12. Thorough base in music, is the part performed with base viols or theorbos, while the voices sing and other instruments perform their parts, or during the intervals when the other parts stop. It is distinguished by figures over the notes.

Counter base is a second or double base when there are several in the same concert.

BASE, verb transitive To embase; to reduce the value by the admixture of meaner metals. [Little used.]

2. To found; to lay the base or foundation.

To base and build the commonwealth of man.

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We (my wife Carolyn and I) teach the original Constitution according to its actual words, so the meaning of those words at the time the Constitution was written and ratified is critical.

— Gary (Cokeville, WY)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

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increpate

IN'CREPATE, v.t. [L. increpo.] To chide; to rebuke. [Not in use.]

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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