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Monday - March 18, 2019

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [bank]

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bank

BANK, n. [Bank and bench are radically the same word. The sense is, that which is set, laid or extended. Applied to a mass of earth, it is a collection, that which is thrown or laid together.]

1. A mound, pile or ridge of earth, raised above the surrounding plain, either as a defense or for other purposes. 2 Sam.xx 15.

2. Any steep acclivity, whether rising from a river, a lake, or the sea, or forming the side of a ravine, or the steep side of a hillock on a plain. When we speak of the earth in general adjoining a lake or the sea, we use the word shore; but a particular steep acclivity on the side of a lake, river or the sea, is called a bank.

3. A bench,or a bench of rowers, in a galley; so called from their seat.

Placed on their banks, the lusty Trojans sweep.

4. By analogy, a collection or stock of money, deposited, by a number of persons, for a particular use; that is, an aggregate of particulars, or a fund; as, to establish a bank, that is a joint fund.

5. The place where a collection of money is deposited; a common repository of the money of individuals or of companies; also a house used for a bank.

6. A company of persons concerned in a bank, whether a private association, or an incorporated company; the stockholders of a bank, or their representatives, the directors, acting in their corporate capacity.

7. An elevation, or rising ground, in the sea; called also flats, shoals, shelves or shallows. These may rise to the surface of the water or near to it; but the word bank signifies also elevated ground at the bottom of the sea, when many fathoms below the surface, as the banks of Newfoundland.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [bank]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BANK, n. [Bank and bench are radically the same word. The sense is, that which is set, laid or extended. Applied to a mass of earth, it is a collection, that which is thrown or laid together.]

1. A mound, pile or ridge of earth, raised above the surrounding plain, either as a defense or for other purposes. 2 Sam.xx 15.

2. Any steep acclivity, whether rising from a river, a lake, or the sea, or forming the side of a ravine, or the steep side of a hillock on a plain. When we speak of the earth in general adjoining a lake or the sea, we use the word shore; but a particular steep acclivity on the side of a lake, river or the sea, is called a bank.

3. A bench,or a bench of rowers, in a galley; so called from their seat.

Placed on their banks, the lusty Trojans sweep.

4. By analogy, a collection or stock of money, deposited, by a number of persons, for a particular use; that is, an aggregate of particulars, or a fund; as, to establish a bank, that is a joint fund.

5. The place where a collection of money is deposited; a common repository of the money of individuals or of companies; also a house used for a bank.

6. A company of persons concerned in a bank, whether a private association, or an incorporated company; the stockholders of a bank, or their representatives, the directors, acting in their corporate capacity.

7. An elevation, or rising ground, in the sea; called also flats, shoals, shelves or shallows. These may rise to the surface of the water or near to it; but the word bank signifies also elevated ground at the bottom of the sea, when many fathoms below the surface, as the banks of Newfoundland.

BANK, n. [Sax. banc; D. and G. bank; Sw. banck; Dan. banke; It. banco; Sp. and Port. banca, banco; Fr. banc, banque; W. banc; Arm. bancq; Ar. بنق bank, a bench. Bank and bench are radically the same word. The sense is, that which is set, laid or extended. Applied to a mass of earth, it is a collection, that which is thrown or laid together.]

  1. A mound, pile or ridge of earth, raised above the surrounding plain, either as a defense or for other purposes. – 2 Sam. xx. 15.
  2. Any steep acclivity, whether rising from a river, a lake, or the sea, or forming the side of a ravine, or the steep side of a hillock on a plain. When we speak of the earth in general adjoining a lake or the sea, we use the word shore; but a particular steep acclivity on the side of a lake, river, or the sea, is called a bank.
  3. A bench, or a bench of rowers, in a galley; so called from their seat. Placed on their banks, the lusty Trojans sweep. – Waller.
  4. By analogy, a collection or stock of money, deposited, by a number of persons, for a particular use; that is, an aggregate of particulars, or a fund; as, to establish a bank, that is a joint fund.
  5. The place where a collection of money is deposited; a common repository of the money of individuals or of companies; also, a house used for a bank.
  6. A company of persons concerned in a bank, whether a private association, or an incorporated company; the stockholders of a bank, or their representatives, the directors, acting in their corporate capacity.
  7. An elevation, or rising ground, in the sea; called also flats, shoals, shelves or shallows. These may rise to the surface of the water or near to it; but the word bank signifies also elevated ground at the bottom of the sea, when many fathoms below the surface; as, the banks of Newfoundland.

BANK, v.t.

  1. To raise a mound or dyke; to inclose, defend or fortify with a bank; as, to bank a house.
  2. To pass by the banks of. As I have bank'd their towns. – Shak. [Not in use.]
  3. To lay up or deposit money in a bank. [Little used.] – Johnson.

Bank
  1. A mound, pile, or ridge of earth, raised above the surrounding level; hence, anything shaped like a mound or ridge of earth; as, a bank of clouds; a bank of snow.

    They cast up a bank against the city.
    2 Sam. xx. 15.

  2. To raise a mound or dike about] to inclose, defend, or fortify with a bank; to embank.

    "Banked well with earth." Holland.
  3. A bench, as for rowers in a galley; also, a tier of oars.

    Placed on their banks, the lusty Trojan sweep
    Neptune's smooth face, and cleave the yielding deep.
    Waller.

  4. An establishment for the custody, loan, exchange, or issue, of money, and for facilitating the transmission of funds by drafts or bills of exchange; an institution incorporated for performing one or more of such functions, or the stockholders (or their representatives, the directors), acting in their corporate capacity.
  5. To deposit in a bank.

    Johnson.
  6. To keep a bank; to carry on the business of a banker.

  7. A group or series of objects arranged near together; as, a bank of electric lamps, etc.

  8. The lateral inclination of an aëroplane as it rounds a curve; as, a bank of 45° is easy; a bank of 90° is dangerous.
  9. To tilt sidewise in rounding a curve; -- said of a flying machine, an aërocurve, or the like.
  10. A steep acclivity, as the slope of a hill, or the side of a ravine.
  11. To heap or pile up; as, to bank sand.
  12. The bench or seat upon which the judges sit.

    (b)
  13. The building or office used for banking purposes.
  14. To deposit money in a bank; to have an account with a banker.
  15. The margin of a watercourse; the rising ground bordering a lake, river, or sea, or forming the edge of a cutting, or other hollow.

    Tiber trembled underneath her banks.
    Shak.

  16. To pass by the banks of.

    [Obs.] Shak.

    To bank a fire, To bank up a fire, to cover the coals or embers with ashes or cinders, thus keeping the fire low but alive.

  17. A sort of table used by printers.
  18. A fund from deposits or contributions, to be used in transacting business; a joint stock or capital.

    [Obs.]

    Let it be no bank or common stock, but every man be master of his own money.
    Bacon.

  19. An elevation, or rising ground, under the sea; a shoal, shelf, or shallow; as, the banks of Newfoundland.
  20. A bench, or row of keys belonging to a keyboard, as in an organ.

    Knight.
  21. The sum of money or the checks which the dealer or banker has as a fund, from which to draw his stakes and pay his losses.
  22. The face of the coal at which miners are working.

    (b)
  23. In certain games, as dominos, a fund of pieces from which the players are allowed to draw.

    Bank credit, a credit by which a person who has given the required security to a bank has liberty to draw to a certain extent agreed upon. -- Bank of deposit, a bank which receives money for safe keeping. -- Bank of issue, a bank which issues its own notes payable to bearer.

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Bank

BANK, noun [Bank and bench are radically the same word. The sense is, that which is set, laid or extended. Applied to a mass of earth, it is a collection, that which is thrown or laid together.]

1. A mound, pile or ridge of earth, raised above the surrounding plain, either as a defense or for other purposes. 2 Samuel 20:15.

2. Any steep acclivity, whether rising from a river, a lake, or the sea, or forming the side of a ravine, or the steep side of a hillock on a plain. When we speak of the earth in general adjoining a lake or the sea, we use the word shore; but a particular steep acclivity on the side of a lake, river or the sea, is called a bank

3. A bench, or a bench of rowers, in a galley; so called from their seat.

Placed on their banks, the lusty Trojans sweep.

4. By analogy, a collection or stock of money, deposited, by a number of persons, for a particular use; that is, an aggregate of particulars, or a fund; as, to establish a bank that is a joint fund.

5. The place where a collection of money is deposited; a common repository of the money of individuals or of companies; also a house used for a bank

6. A company of persons concerned in a bank whether a private association, or an incorporated company; the stockholders of a bank or their representatives, the directors, acting in their corporate capacity.

7. An elevation, or rising ground, in the sea; called also flats, shoals, shelves or shallows. These may rise to the surface of the water or near to it; but the word bank signifies also elevated ground at the bottom of the sea, when many fathoms below the surface, as the banks of Newfoundland.

BANK, verb transitive To raise a mound or dyke; to inclose, defend or fortify with a bank; as, to bank a house.

2. To pass by the banks of.

As I have bank'd their towns. [Not in use.]

3. To lay up or deposit money in a bank (Little used.]

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IMPORT'ANCE, n.

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2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

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He believes himself a man of importance.

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Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

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