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In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [ball]

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ball

BALL, n.[L. pila; A ball may signify a mass from collecting, or it may be that which is driven, from the root of L. pello; probably the former.]

1. A round body; a spherical substance, whether natural or artificial; or a body nearly round; as, a ball for play; a ball of thread; a ball of snow.

2. A bullet; a ball of iron or lead for cannon, muskets, &c.

3. A printer's ball, consisting of hair or wool, covered with leather or skin, and fastened to a stock, called a ball-stock, and used to put ink on the types in the forms.

4. The globe or earth, from its figure.

5. A globe borne as an ensign of authority; as, to hold the ball of a kingdom.

6. Any part of the body that is round or protuberant; as, the eye ball; the ball of the thumb or foot.

7. The weight at the bottom of a pendulum.

8. Among the Cornish miners in England, a tin mine.

9. In pyrotechnics, a composition of combustible ingredients, which serve to burn, smoke or give light.

Ball-stock, among printers, a stock somewhat hollow at one end, to which balls of skin, stuffed with wool, are fastened, and which serves as a handle.

Ball-vein, among miners, a sort of iron ore, found in loose masses, of a circular form, containing sparkling particles.

Ball and socket, an instrument used in surveying and astronomy, made of brass, with a perpetual screw, to move horizontally, obliquely, or vertically.

Puff-ball, in botany, the Lycoperdon, a genus of fungeses.

Fire-ball, a meteor; a luminous globe darting through the atmosphere; also, a bag of canvas filled with gunpowder, sulphur, pitch, saltpeter, &c.,to be thrown by the hand, or from mortars, to set fire to houses.

BALL, n.[Gr.to toss or throw; to leap.] An entertainment of dancing; originally and peculiarly, at the invitation and expense of an individual; but the word is used in America, for a dance at the expense of the attendants.

19

BALL, v.i. To form into a ball, as snow on horses' hoofs, or on the feet. We say the horse balls, or the snow balls.




Evolution (or devolution) of this word [ball]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

BALL, n.[L. pila; A ball may signify a mass from collecting, or it may be that which is driven, from the root of L. pello; probably the former.]

1. A round body; a spherical substance, whether natural or artificial; or a body nearly round; as, a ball for play; a ball of thread; a ball of snow.

2. A bullet; a ball of iron or lead for cannon, muskets, &c.

3. A printer's ball, consisting of hair or wool, covered with leather or skin, and fastened to a stock, called a ball-stock, and used to put ink on the types in the forms.

4. The globe or earth, from its figure.

5. A globe borne as an ensign of authority; as, to hold the ball of a kingdom.

6. Any part of the body that is round or protuberant; as, the eye ball; the ball of the thumb or foot.

7. The weight at the bottom of a pendulum.

8. Among the Cornish miners in England, a tin mine.

9. In pyrotechnics, a composition of combustible ingredients, which serve to burn, smoke or give light.

Ball-stock, among printers, a stock somewhat hollow at one end, to which balls of skin, stuffed with wool, are fastened, and which serves as a handle.

Ball-vein, among miners, a sort of iron ore, found in loose masses, of a circular form, containing sparkling particles.

Ball and socket, an instrument used in surveying and astronomy, made of brass, with a perpetual screw, to move horizontally, obliquely, or vertically.

Puff-ball, in botany, the Lycoperdon, a genus of fungeses.

Fire-ball, a meteor; a luminous globe darting through the atmosphere; also, a bag of canvas filled with gunpowder, sulphur, pitch, saltpeter, &c.,to be thrown by the hand, or from mortars, to set fire to houses.

BALL, n.[Gr.to toss or throw; to leap.] An entertainment of dancing; originally and peculiarly, at the invitation and expense of an individual; but the word is used in America, for a dance at the expense of the attendants.

19

BALL, v.i. To form into a ball, as snow on horses' hoofs, or on the feet. We say the horse balls, or the snow balls.


BALL, n.1 [G. ball; D. bal; Sw. ball; Dan. ballon; Russ. bal; Sp. bala, bola; It. palla; L. pila; W. pêl, pellen; Arm. bolat; Fr. balle, boule. A ball may signify a mass from collecting, or it may be that which is driven, from the root of L. pello; probably the former.]

  1. A round body; spherical substance, whether natural or artificial; or a body nearly round; as, a ball for play; a ball of thread; a ball of snow.
  2. A bullet; a ball of iron or lead for cannon, muskets, &c.
  3. A printer's ball, consisting of hair or wool, covered with leather or skin, and fastened to a stock, called a ball-stock, and used to put ink on the types in the forms.
  4. The globe or earth, from its figure.
  5. A globe borne as ensign of authority; as, to hold the ball of a kingdom. – Bacon.
  6. Any part of the body that is round or protuberant; as, the eye ball; the ball of the thumb or foot.
  7. The weight at the bottom of a pendulum.
  8. Among the Cornish miners in England, a tin mine.
  9. In pyrotechnics, a composition of combustible ingredients, which serve to burn, smoke or give light. Ball-stock, among printers, a stock somewhat hollow at one end, to which balls of skin, stuffed with wool, are fastened, and which serves as a handle. Ball-vein, among miners, a sort of iron ore, found in loose masses, of a circular form, containing sparkling particles. – Encyc. Ball and socket, an instrument used in surveying and astronomy, made of brass, with a perpetual screw, to move horizontally, obliquely, or vertically. Puff-ball, in botany, the Lycoperdon, a genus of funguses. Fire-ball, a meteor; a luminous globe darting through the atmosphere; also, a bag of canvas filled with gunpowder, sulphur, pitch, saltpeter, &c., to be thrown by the hand, or from mortars, to set fire to houses.

BALL, n.2 [Fr. bal; It. ballo; Sp. bayle, a dance; It. ballare, to dance, to shake; Gr. βαλλω, to toss or throw; or παλλω, to leap.]

An entertainment of dancing; originally and peculiarly, at the invitation and expense of an individual; but the word, is used in America, for a dance at the expense of the attendants.


BALL, v.i.

To form into a ball, as snow on horses' hoofs, or on the feet. We say the horse balls, or the snow balls.


Ball
  1. Any round or roundish body or mass; a sphere or globe; as, a ball of twine; a ball of snow.
  2. To gather balls which cling to the feet, as of damp snow or clay] to gather into balls; as, the horse balls; the snow balls.
  3. To heat in a furnace and form into balls for rolling.
  4. A social assembly for the purpose of dancing.
  5. A pitched ball, not struck at by the batsman, which fails to pass over the home base at a height not greater than the batsman's shoulder nor less than his knee.
  6. A spherical body of any substance or size used to play with, as by throwing, knocking, kicking, etc.
  7. To form or wind into a ball; as, to ball cotton.
  8. A general name for games in which a ball is thrown, kicked, or knocked. See Baseball, and Football.
  9. Any solid spherical, cylindrical, or conical projectile of lead or iron, to be discharged from a firearm; as, a cannon ball; a rifle ball; -- often used collectively; as, powder and ball. Spherical balls for the smaller firearms are commonly called bullets.
  10. A flaming, roundish body shot into the air] a case filled with combustibles intended to burst and give light or set fire, or to produce smoke or stench; as, a fire ball; a stink ball.
  11. A leather-covered cushion, fastened to a handle called a ballstock; -- formerly used by printers for inking the form, but now superseded by the roller.
  12. A roundish protuberant portion of some part of the body; as, the ball of the thumb; the ball of the foot.
  13. A large pill, a form in which medicine is commonly given to horses; a bolus.

    White.
  14. The globe or earth.

    Pope.

    Move round the dark terrestrial ball.
    Addison.

    Ball and socket joint, a joint in which a ball moves within a socket, so as to admit of motion in every direction within certain limits. -- Ball bearings, a mechanical device for lessening the friction of axle bearings by means of small loose metal balls. -- Ball cartridge, a cartridge containing a ball, as distinguished from a blank cartridge, containing only powder. -- Ball cock, a faucet or valve which is opened or closed by the fall or rise of a ball floating in water at the end of a lever. -- Ball gudgeon, a pivot of a spherical form, which permits lateral deflection of the arbor or shaft, while retaining the pivot in its socket. Knight. -- Ball lever, the lever used in a ball cock. -- Ball of the eye, the eye itself, as distinguished from its lids and socket; -- formerly, the pupil of the eye. -- Ball valve (Mach.), a contrivance by which a ball, placed in a circular cup with a hole in its bottom, operates as a valve. -- Ball vein (Mining), a sort of iron ore, found in loose masses of a globular form, containing sparkling particles. -- Three balls, or Three golden balls, a pawnbroker's sign or shop.

    Syn. -- See Globe.

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Ball

BALL, noun [Latin pila; A ball may signify a mass from collecting, or it may be that which is driven, from the root of Latin pello; probably the former.]

1. A round body; a spherical substance, whether natural or artificial; or a body nearly round; as, a ball for play; a ball of thread; a ball of snow.

2. A bullet; a ball of iron or lead for cannon, muskets, etc.

3. A printer's ball consisting of hair or wool, covered with leather or skin, and fastened to a stock, called a ball-stock, and used to put ink on the types in the forms.

4. The globe or earth, from its figure.

5. A globe borne as an ensign of authority; as, to hold the ball of a kingdom.

6. Any part of the body that is round or protuberant; as, the eye ball; the ball of the thumb or foot.

7. The weight at the bottom of a pendulum.

8. Among the Cornish miners in England, a tin mine.

9. In pyrotechnics, a composition of combustible ingredients, which serve to burn, smoke or give light.

BALL-stock, among printers, a stock somewhat hollow at one end, to which balls of skin, stuffed with wool, are fastened, and which serves as a handle.

BALL-vein, among miners, a sort of iron ore, found in loose masses, of a circular form, containing sparkling particles.

BALL and socket, an instrument used in surveying and astronomy, made of brass, with a perpetual screw, to move horizontally, obliquely, or vertically.

Puff-ball, in botany, the Lycoperdon, a genus of fungeses.

Fire-ball, a meteor; a luminous globe darting through the atmosphere; also, a bag of canvas filled with gunpowder, sulphur, pitch, saltpeter, etc., to be thrown by the hand, or from mortars, to set fire to houses.

BALL, noun [Gr.to toss or throw; to leap.] An entertainment of dancing; originally and peculiarly, at the invitation and expense of an individual; but the word is used in America, for a dance at the expense of the attendants.

BALL, verb intransitive To form into a ball as snow on horses' hoofs, or on the feet. We say the horse balls, or the snow balls.

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I would like to use for reference to words in the KJV bible.

— Bob (Salisbury, MA)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

consideration

CONSIDERATION, n. [L. See Consider.]

1. The act of considering; mental view; regard; notice.

Let us take into consideration the consequences of a hasty decision.

2. Mature thought; serious deliberation.

Let us think with consideration.

3. Contemplation; meditation.

The love you bear to Mopsa hath brought you to the consideration of her virtues.

4. Some degree of importance; claim to notice, or regard; a moderate degree of respectability.

Lucan is an author of consideration among the Latin poets.

5. That which is considered; motive of action; influence; ground of conduct.

He was obliged, antecedent to all other considerations, to search an asylum.

6. Reason; that which induces to a determination.

He was moved by the considerations set before him.

7. In law, the reason which moves a contracting party to enter into an agreement; the material cause of a contract; the price or motive of a stipulation. In all contracts, each party gives something in exchange for what he receives.

A contract is an agreement, upon sufficient consideration. This consideration is express or implied; express, when the thing to be given or done is specified; implied, when no specific consideration is agreed upon, but justice requires it and the law implies it; as when a man labors for another, without stipulating for wages, the law infers that he shall receive a reasonable consideration. A good consideration is that of blood, or natural love; a valuable consideration, is such as money, marriage, &c. Hence a consideration is an equivalent or recompense; that which is given as of equal estimated value with that which is received.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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