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Monday - December 10, 2018

In my view, the Christian religion is the most important and one of the first things in which all children, under a free government ought to be instructed... No truth is more evident to my mind than that the Christian religion must be the basis of any government intended to secure the rights and privileges of a free people.
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1828 Noah Webster Dictionary
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1828.mshaffer.comWord [as]

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as

AS, adv. az. [Gr. But more probably the English word is contracted from als.]

1. Literally, like; even; similar. "Ye shall be as Gods, knowing good and evil." "As far as we can see," that is, like far, equally far. Hence it may be explained by in like manner; as, do as you are commanded.

2. It was formerly used where we now use that. Obs.

The relations are so uncertain as they require a great deal of examination.

3. It was formerly used where we now use that. Obs.

He lies, as he his bliss did know.

4. While; during; at the same time. "He trembled as he spoke." But in most of its uses, it is resolvable into like, equal, even, or equally, in like manner. In some phrases, it must be considered a nominative word, or other words must be supplied. "Appoint to office such men as deserve public confidence." This phrase may be elliptical for "such men as those who deserve public confidence."

As seems, in some cases, to imply the sense of proportion. "In general, men are more happy, as they are less involved in public concerns."

As, in a subsequent part of a sentence, answers to such; give us such things as you please; and in a preceding part of a sentence, has so to answer to it; as with the people, so with the priest.

AS, n. [L.]

1. A Roman weight of 12 ounces, answering to the libra or pound.

2. A Roman coin, originally of a pound weight; but reduced, after the first Punic war, to two ounces; in the second Punic war, to one ounce; and by the Papirian law, to half an ounce. It was originally stamped with the figure of a sheep, sow, or ox; and afterwards with a Janus, on one side, and on the reverse, a rostrum or prow of a ship.

3. An integer; a whole or single thing. Hence the English ace. Hence the Romans used the word for the whole inheritance; haeres ex asse, an heir to the whole estate.



Evolution (or devolution) of this word [as]

1828 Webster1844 Webster1913 Webster

AS, adv. az. [Gr. But more probably the English word is contracted from als.]

1. Literally, like; even; similar. "Ye shall be as Gods, knowing good and evil." "As far as we can see," that is, like far, equally far. Hence it may be explained by in like manner; as, do as you are commanded.

2. It was formerly used where we now use that. Obs.

The relations are so uncertain as they require a great deal of examination.

3. It was formerly used where we now use that. Obs.

He lies, as he his bliss did know.

4. While; during; at the same time. "He trembled as he spoke." But in most of its uses, it is resolvable into like, equal, even, or equally, in like manner. In some phrases, it must be considered a nominative word, or other words must be supplied. "Appoint to office such men as deserve public confidence." This phrase may be elliptical for "such men as those who deserve public confidence."

As seems, in some cases, to imply the sense of proportion. "In general, men are more happy, as they are less involved in public concerns."

As, in a subsequent part of a sentence, answers to such; give us such things as you please; and in a preceding part of a sentence, has so to answer to it; as with the people, so with the priest.

AS, n. [L.]

1. A Roman weight of 12 ounces, answering to the libra or pound.

2. A Roman coin, originally of a pound weight; but reduced, after the first Punic war, to two ounces; in the second Punic war, to one ounce; and by the Papirian law, to half an ounce. It was originally stamped with the figure of a sheep, sow, or ox; and afterwards with a Janus, on one side, and on the reverse, a rostrum or prow of a ship.

3. An integer; a whole or single thing. Hence the English ace. Hence the Romans used the word for the whole inheritance; haeres ex asse, an heir to the whole estate.

AS, adv. [az; Pers. اَسَا asa, like, similar, as; Gr. ὡς; Qu. Fr. aussi. But more probably the English word is contracted from als, G. and D. It corresponds in sense with the Persian.]

  1. Literally, like; even; similar. “Ye shall be as Gods, knowing good and evil.” “As far as we can see,” that is, like far, equally far. Hence it may be explained by in like manner; as, do as you are commanded.
  2. It was formerly used where we now use that. [Obs.] The relations are so uncertain as they require a great deal of examination. – Bacon.
  3. It was formerly used for as if. [Obs.] He lies, as he his bliss did know. – Waller.
  4. While; during; at the same time. “He trembled as he spoke.” But in most of its uses, it is resolvable into like, equal, even, or equally, in like manner. In some phrases, it must be considered a nominative word, or other words must be supplied. “Appoint to office such men as deserve public confidence.” This phrase may be elliptical for “such men as those who deserve public confidence.” As seems, in some cases, to imply the sense of proportion. “In general, men are more happy, as they are less involved in public concerns.” As, in a subsequent part of a sentence, answers to such; give us such things as you please; and in a preceding part of a sentence, has so to answer to it; as with the people, so with the priest.

AS, n. [L.]

  1. A Roman weight of 12 ounces, answering to the libra or pound.
  2. A Roman coin, originally of a pound weight; but reduced, after the first Punic war, to two ounces; in the second Punic War, to one ounce; and by the Papirian law, to half an ounce. It was originally stamped with the figure of a sheep, sow, or ox; and afterward with a Janus, on one side, and on the reverse, a rostrum or prow of a ship.
  3. An integer; a whole or single thing. Hence the English ace. Hence the Romans used the word for the whole inheritance; hæres ex asse, an heir to the whole estate. – Encyc.

As
  1. Denoting equality or likeness in kind, degree, or manner; like; similar to; in the same manner with or in which; in accordance with; in proportion to; to the extent or degree in which or to which; equally; no less than; as, ye shall be as gods, knowing good and evil; you will reap as you sow; do as you are bidden.

    His spiritual attendants adjured him, as he loved his soul, to emancipate his brethren.
    Macaulay.

    * As is often preceded by one of the antecedent or correlative words such, same, so, or as, in expressing an equality or comparison; as, give us such things as you please, and so long as you please, or as long as you please; he is not so brave as Cato; she is as amiable as she is handsome; come as quickly as possible. "Bees appear fortunately to prefer the same colors as we do." Lubbock. As, in a preceding part of a sentence, has such or so to answer correlatively to it; as with the people, so with the priest.

  2. An ace.

    [Obs.] Chaucer.

    Ambes-as, double aces.

  3. A Roman weight, answering to the libra or pound, equal to nearly eleven ounces Troy weight. It was divided into twelve ounces.
  4. In the idea, character, or condition of, -- limiting the view to certain attributes or relations; as, virtue considered as virtue; this actor will appear as Hamlet.

    The beggar is greater as a man, than is the man merely as a king.
    Dewey.

  5. A Roman copper coin, originally of a pound weight (12 oz.); but reduced, after the first Punic war, to two ounces; in the second Punic war, to one ounce; and afterwards to half an ounce.
  6. While; during or at the same time that; when; as, he trembled as he spoke.

    As I return I will fetch off these justices.
    Shak.

  7. Because; since; it being the case that.

    As the population of Scotland had been generally trained to arms . . . they were not indifferently prepared.
    Sir W. Scott.

    [See Synonym under Because.]

  8. Expressing concession. (Often approaching though in meaning).

    We wish, however, to avail ourselves of the interest, transient as it may be, which this work has excited.
    Macaulay.

  9. That, introducing or expressing a result or consequence, after the correlatives so and such.

    [Obs.]

    I can place thee in such abject state, as help shall never find thee.
    Rowe.

    So as, so that. [Obs.]

    The relations are so uncertain as they require a great deal of examination.
    Bacon.

  10. As if; as though.

    [Obs. or Poetic]

    He lies, as he his bliss did know.
    Waller.

  11. For instance; by way of example; thus; -- used to introduce illustrative phrases, sentences, or citations.
  12. Than.

    [Obs. *** R.]

    The king was not more forward to bestow favors on them as they free to deal affronts to others their superiors.
    Fuller.

  13. Expressing a wish.

    [Obs.] "As have," i. e., may he have. Chaucer.

    As . . as. See So . . as, under So. -- As far as, to the extent or degree. "As far as can be ascertained." Macaulay. -- As far forth as, as far as. [Obs.] Chaucer. -- As for, or As to, in regard to] with respect to. -- As good as, not less than; not falling short of. -- As good as one's word, faithful to a promise. -- As if, or As though, of the same kind, or in the same condition or manner, that it would be if. -- As it were (as if it were), a qualifying phrase used to apologize for or to relieve some expression which might be regarded as inappropriate or incongruous; in a manner. -- As now, just now. [Obs.] Chaucer. -- As swythe, as quickly as possible. [Obs.] Chaucer. -- As well, also; too; besides. Addison. -- As well as, equally with, no less than. "I have understanding as well as you." Job xii. 3. -- As yet, until now; up to or at the present time; still; now.

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As

AS, adverb az. [Gr. But more probably the English word is contracted from als.]

1. Literally, like; even; similar. 'Ye shall be as Gods, knowing good and evil.' 'As far as we can see, ' that is, like far, equally far. Hence it may be explained by in like manner; as do as you are commanded.

2. It was formerly used where we now use that. obsolete

The relations are so uncertain as they require a great deal of examination.

3. It was formerly used where we now use that. obsolete

He lies, as he his bliss did know.

4. While; during; at the same time. 'He trembled as he spoke.' But in most of its uses, it is resolvable into like, equal, even, or equally, in like manner. In some phrases, it must be considered a nominative word, or other words must be supplied. 'Appoint to office such men as deserve public confidence.' This phrase may be elliptical for 'such men as those who deserve public confidence.'

AS seems, in some cases, to imply the sense of proportion. 'In general, men are more happy, as they are less involved in public concerns.'

AS, in a subsequent part of a sentence, answers to such; give us such things as you please; and in a preceding part of a sentence, has so to answer to it; as with the people, so with the priest.

AS, noun [Latin]

1. A Roman weight of 12 ounces, answering to the libra or pound.

2. A Roman coin, originally of a pound weight; but reduced, after the first Punic war, to two ounces; in the second Punic war, to one ounce; and by the Papirian law, to half an ounce. It was originally stamped with the figure of a sheep, sow, or ox; and afterwards with a Janus, on one side, and on the reverse, a rostrum or prow of a ship.

3. An integer; a whole or single thing. Hence the English ace. Hence the Romans used the word for the whole inheritance; haeres ex asse, an heir to the whole estate.

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I USE IT WHEN PREPARING FOR BIBLE STUDY.

— Charles (Mobile, AL)

Word of the Day

importance

IMPORT'ANCE, n.

1. Weight; consequence; a bearing on some interest; that quality of any thing by which it may affect a measure, interest or result. The education of youth is of great importance to a free government. A religious education is of infinite importance to every human being.

2. Weight or consequence in the scale of being.

Thy own importance know.

Nor bound thy narrow views to things below.

3. Weight or consequence in self-estimation.

He believes himself a man of importance.

4. Thing implied; matter; subject; importunity. [In these senses, obsolete.]

Random Word

piked

PIK'ED, a. Pointed; sharp.

Let the stake be made picked at the top.

Noah's 1828 Dictionary

First dictionary of the American Language!

Noah Webster, the Father of American Christian education, wrote the first American dictionary and established a system of rules to govern spelling, grammar, and reading. This master linguist understood the power of words, their definitions, and the need for precise word usage in communication to maintain independence. Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions.

This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies.

No other dictionary compares with the Webster's 1828 dictionary. The English language has changed again and again and in many instances has become corrupt. The American Dictionary of the English Language is based upon God's written word, for Noah Webster used the Bible as the foundation for his definitions. This standard reference tool will greatly assist students of all ages in their studies. From American History to literature, from science to the Word of God, this dictionary is a necessity. For homeschoolers as well as avid Bible students it is easy, fast, and sophisticated.


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